Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 14 – 21, 2018

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We’ve had some recent spells of severe weather in the USA, but the rest of May looks unusually quiet. Considering the alternative, I’m not complaining. Speaking of severe weather, here’s a quick reminder to check your NOAA weather radio as we navigate our way through the peak of the North American severe weather season and prepare for the beginning of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Only time will tell if this works. “Twitter Changes Strategy In Battle Against Internet Trolls.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

At least the largest of these will fall in desolate areas. “Large boulders 2 metres across and weighing 10 tonnes could soon begin blasting out from Kilauea, the erupting volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island.”

Kilauea is a major volcanic event. In spite of that, “the largest possible explosive event from Kilauea would still be tiny compared to other volcanoes around the world, from Krakatoa to Mount St. Helens to Vesuvius.”

Property damage isn’t the only victim of Kilauea’s activity. Public health is an ongoing issue that need more media coverage than property damage.

In retrospect, here’s a look at the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. (Article originally published in 2014.)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Here’s an interesting read on combining renewable energy and collecting NOAA environmental data. “Adaptable And Driven By Renewable Energy, Saildrones Voyage Into Remote Waters.”

The challenges on how to handle plastic pollution are not easy to sort out. Here’s one perspective on how solutions could be worse than the current situation.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Monitor is out. There’s little to no relief in sight for drought ravaged regions in the Extreme/Exceptional areas from the southwest into Oklahoma and Texas.

Sample of U.S. Drought Monitor

A wider perspective on the current USA drought conditions can be found at the US Drought Portal page.

The dismal snow pack in many western USA states isn’t a good sign for the summer heat and wildfires that often occur in this mountainous region.

There has been some discussion recently on the topic of heat bursts. They’re a common phenomenon, especially in the USA’s great plains. Here’s a good read on a fascinating weather event.

Hurricane Harvey was a powerful hurricane on its own. The record heat in the Gulf of Mexico just added more fuel to the fire. Unfortunately, this also means that tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin could pack more of a powerful punch than people in their path are capable of dealing with.

In a new report released on 17 May 2018, NOAA confirmed that April 2018 was the 400th consecutive month of warmer-than-average global temperatures. “The year-to-date (January-April) global temperature was the fifth warmest such period in the 139-year record.”

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/april-2018-global-significant-events-map.png

Infographic courtesy NOAA

New studies hint at climate change and its ramifications could be far worse than we anticipate.

PUBLIC POLICY

Becoming a politically engaged scientist has become less of an option and more of a requirement in today’s politically volatile climate.

The plot thickens as the train wreck continues. The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been engaged in some unscientific actions as of late…and that’s putting it politely.

An interesting tale of a USA government sea level rise report finally being released after charges of censorship. “Although National Park Service officials say the report was handled properly, the study’s lead author says the administrative review process has morphed from a “rubber stamp” into a tool for the government to suppress inconvenient science. “Censorship is a good word for that,” said Maria Caffrey, the University of Colorado, Boulder, researcher who led the study.” There’s no shortage of censorship and twisting facts when it comes to climate change denialists.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Stay safe and keep your eyes on the sky!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 7 – 14, 2018

Greetings everyone! In spite of the relatively quiet spring severe weather season in the USA, it’s a good idea to stay on our toes and not let complacency set in. All it takes is one regional outbreak to change the statistics for the year. Here’s an important reminder on the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning. More information can be found in the Weather Safety portion of this week’s post. There’s plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

You’ll find more information in the Weather Safety portion of this post.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This study has some disconcerting findings regarding the spread of false information across social media. If anything, it drives home the point that you should always rely on official National Weather Service and broadcast meteorologists for weather information, severe weather in particular. “During disasters, active Twitter users are likely to spread falsehoods. That’s according to new research that examined false tweets from Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombing. Researchers found that 86 to 91 percent of active Twitter users spread misinformation, and that nearly as many did nothing to correct it.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The USA does have its share of volcanoes. Some like Kilauea are quite active. In spite of its menacing appearance, the red hot lava isn’t how most people die from a volcano. Take a look at how volcanoes kill people.

Here are some spectacular images of Kilauea along with an interesting perspective on what residents of Hawaii see and its contrast with the viewpoints of geoscientists. “Both geoscientists and native Hawaiians agree that Hawaii’s lava is special. But they have different ways of talking about why that is—and different ways of seeing the substance that defines their profession or gives them a home.”

The visual impact of Kilauea can’t be denied when you look at this selection of images that go back to 5 May 2018.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Wildfires alone carry their own potentially deadly threat, but the smoke can have very serious health consequences to some people miles away from the fires.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Can the sounds made by a tornado give a warning to a community? This novel idea in research seems to think so.

Here’s an interesting look at tornado activity and a state-by-state examination of distribution, monthly activity, etc. You’ll find some surprising data here

This is a nice piece with Rick Smith of NWS Norman, OK discussing the daunting challenges of forecasting weather in the world’s bullseye for tornado activity.

With the Atlantic hurricane season only weeks away, take a look at how supercomputers are revolutionizing one of the most daunting tasks a meteorologist can face…forecasting tropical cyclones.

The political bent of climate change and the contention that arises from it is quite absent in many other countries…except for the USA.

This may not be official White House policy, but the head of the USA’s Coast Guard isn’t afraid to discuss climate change. After all, rising sea levels are critical to their operations.

There’s been a lot of hyperbole as of late about air travel being a horrendous demon when it comes to CO2 emissions and it playing a major role in climate change. That makes for good headlines and, perhaps most oddly, some people swearing off air travel. The truth is that the real problem is what people do when they get where they’re going…even if they get there via a banana boat.

The latest State Of The Climate report for April 2018 is out…and one common thread is that is was quite dry in the plains and southwest and unusually cool for much of the contiguous USA.

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/april-2018-us-significant-events-map.png

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, is well underway.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Last but not least…if you missed any safety information during National Hurricane Preparedness Week you can catch up at this link from the National Weather Service.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun. Much more to come so stick around.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 30 – May 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active severe weather week across much of the USA. Oddly enough, Oklahoma went the entire month of April without a single tornado. That came to an end in the first week  of May when multiple rounds of severe weather added several tornadoes to the count. We’re also just weeks away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season (June 1st) and May 6 – 12, 2018 is National Hurricane Preparedness week. Even though the peak of hurricane activity isn’t for several months, now it the time to prepare. Check out the link below in Weather Safety for more comprehensive information from the National Weather Service. As usual, there’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen scientist is easy (no Ph.D required) and gives you an opportunity to contribute valuable data year round. Check out “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data for climate data banks and severe storm and radar research.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re not to enthralled about the recent happenings with Facebook, there are plenty of good alternatives.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been very active lately…and that has volcanologists very nervous.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC HEALTH

Ticks are always a hazard to humans with the ability to spread a myriad of life altering diseases. The USA’s Center For Disease Control (CDC) has expressed concern over the matter, but has been cautious in expressing a connection to climate change in this public health hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A recent dust storm in India killed over 100 people. There were many weather elements involved, including violent thunderstorms with damaging straight line winds.

Part 2 of this essay should be very telling and not a little interesting. “The 1970’s Global Cooling Zombie Myth And The Tricks Some People Used To Keep It Alive: Part 1.”

One of the biggest challenges for our society to comprehend current CO2 levels is because when they were at current levels in the past, humans didn’t exist.

Arctic sea ice is already at record low levels. A recent spike in winter temperatures has happened on consecutive years is making a bad situation even worse.

Climate change means big health issues for those with seasonal allergies. Growing seasons are getting longer and that means a longer pollen season.

Residents of California are getting use to a new weather and climate norm that’s not a little troubling. “Turbulent California faces a future of parched croplands and then flooded townships. Climate scientists call such things whiplash events.”

This past week marked the 19th anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas & Oklahoma tornado outbreak. It was the largest outbreak in the history of Oklahoma, had the 1st billion dollar tornado which was also the 1st time the NWS issued a Tornado Emergency, & had four OK tornadoes in progress simultaneously at the height of the event.

This is the wording used by the Norman, Oklahoma National Weather Service when they issued the first ever Tornado Emergency…the highest level of Tornado Warning that can be issued and is, according to the NWS, “An exceedingly rare tornado warning issued when there is a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage from an imminent or ongoing tornado. This tornado warning is reserved for situations when a reliable source confirms a tornado, or there is clear radar evidence of the existence of a damaging tornado, such as the observation of debris.”

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, has arrived.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Good infographics with severe weather safety information that’s specific to tornadoes.

Once you’re in a structure, there are specific places you need to go for the best protection

Infographics courtesy NOAA & NWS Norman, OK

National Hurricane Preparedness week runs from May 6 – 12, 2018. The National Weather Service has an excellent hurricane preparedness page that covers most everything you need to know. The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) also has a very informative page.

Remember, your mobile device can be your best friend in a weather emergency, whether it’s a tornado or a hurricane.

 

THE QUIXOTIC

This writer visited a Flat Earth Convention (yes, there is such a thing) and learned a great deal about not only the group in question, but insight into certain dimensions of human behavior.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a hearty thanks to my long time followers. It’s nice to have all of you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 23 – 30, 2018

Greetings everyone! If it’s spring in your location, I hope the weather is warming up nicely. For much of North America, the spring warmth got off to a slower than usual start, but that doesn’t mean that a cool summer is on tap. For my friends south of the equator, I hope your autumn is being good to you. Here in the USA, the typical severe weather “season” has been rather quiet, but that could change in a manner of days. At the bottom of this week’s post are several links regarding severe weather safety and a couple of infographics that I hope you’ll find helpful. There’s plenty of other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

With recent concerns over Facebook and privacy, others are looking at social media and websites in general for how they collect information on you. Here’s a good read on how to find out which apps have access to your Google information.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data year round.

Do the changing of the climate seasons seem off kilter to you? If so, you can help document changes in this impressive citizen science project…and anyone can help.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The best image of our galaxy to date has just been published and it’s truly spectacular.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Very small pieces of automobile tires and synthetic fabrics are making their way into our oceans in a microscopic form.

Many companies are pledging to cut plastic pollution. Quite a few are household names with international business. This is good and well, but if it’s only occurring in the UK and a handful of other countries, the benefits will be very, very limited.

Interesting development for the future of the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). “Pruitt Proposes New Rule Defining What Science Can Be Used By EPA.” Understandably so, scientific organizations are very concerned this will exclude valuable data from EPA’s rule-making process.

Here’s some very encouraging renewable energy news. Wind and solar accounted for more than 98 percent of all new USA electrical generation placed into service in the first two months of this year.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past April 24, 2018 was the 25th anniversary of the Tulsa/Catoosa, OK tornado. A pair of strong/violent tornadoes heavily damaged areas in the northeastern parts of the metro. Here’s a look back at the aftermath.

The world’s first trillion dollar natural disaster could happen in California in a wintertime mega-flood that would be the equivalent of eight Hurricane Katrinas. With climate change in the mix, the chances of it happening within a century have increased dramatically.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is far from totally inclusive of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity across North America arrives in May and lasts well into June…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Now for a few infographics. Here’s an important word on those “tornado sirens” that people put far too much importance on…

The bottom line: Sirens are an old school Cold War era technology that often malfunction for a myriad of reasons, can only warn people in very close proximity, and are at the whims of local emergency management. The National Weather Service has NO control over sirens. In the cacophony of a raging supercell thunderstorm that’s parked over your head, you’ll not hear a siren…so it would behoove you to get your potentially life-saving severe weather warning information from a reliable source.

If severe weather is forecast for your area, what do those “risk” categories mean? This infographic should clear up any questions you have. The Storm Prediction Center website is where you will find all of the details specific to your area.

Quite often, if you’re in a risk area (Slight, Enhanced, etc.) a Severe Thunderstorm Watch or Tornado Watch will be issued for your area. There are likely to be warnings as well. This infographic explains the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Lastly, remember to follow your local National Weather Service office and the broadcast meteorologists of your choice for local information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long-time followers. It’s great to have you all along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 16 – 23, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active spring across much of North America in the past few days with everything from severe weather to massive wildfires to blizzard conditions in the mix. Fortunately, those of us who live on this continent are conditioned to expect such extremes as the seasons change. Speaking of seasons changing, here’s one reminder for severe weather safety on the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

As usual, there are plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION/PHYSICS

If you’ve never read “The Feynman Lectures on Physics” and are interested in this essential element of a comprehensive scientific education, you’re in for a treat. The most popular book on physics is now available online.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

The planet we call “home” is an amazing place. Here’s a list of thirteen thing about our humble home that everyone should know.

Here’s some excellent renewable energy news. There are four USA states that are getting over thirty percent of their electrical power from wind…and they are (from a political standpoint) conservative Republican states.

This past 22 April was Earth Day. Here’s a good way to take a look at your personal carbon footprint. The most important factor to keep in mind is that the small changes are often the most important.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

One of the pervasive myths about tornadoes is that they don’t hit cities. In spite of many events, this myth persists to this day. Dr. Marshall Shepherd has written an excellent essay that puts a stake in the heart of a potentially dangerous fallacy.

Here’s a comprehensive review from NOAA of the global climate conditions and events of March 2018.

An interesting new study shows a unique perspective on climate change and how it has affected a climactic boundary.

Many areas in the Northern Hemisphere had a rather cold winter but for the Arctic, there was a very different story.

Do the climates of the past have anything to offer us today? Indeed they do. A keen understanding of past climates helps us understand today’s weather in a myriad of ways.

Here’s a spot-on and very important climate essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Climate Change Or Global Warming? Three Reasons Not To Be Distracted By The Name Game.”

An excellent read and retrospective by Michael E. Mann on Earth Day and the 20th anniversary of the Hockey Stick.

Slowly but surely, the tide is changing in public opinion regarding climate change. “Seventy percent of Americans now accept that climate change is happening, outnumbering those who don’t by a 5 to 1 ratio, according to a new survey by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. More than half of those surveyed, 58 percent, said they also understand global warming is caused mostly by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels.”

This interactive graphic from Climate Central shows data on how the USA has been warming ever since the first Earth Day.

Finally, here’s some exciting news regarding weather satellites…the capability to map lightning which is critical data for meteorologists.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s good to have you along!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 9 – 16, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope that the weather is to your liking regardless of where you’re located. In recent days, the USA has taken quite a beating from blizzards, severe weather outbreaks, and devastating wildfires. Add to that an ongoing drought for the southwestern and southern plains states and it’s not been exactly a quiet spring. For this week’s post, I’ve included severe weather safety information which, to be really honest, is something that we should be aware of year round.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Searching publications is a routine part of scientific research…but there are barriers that are costly and waste time for many scientists.

Is science hitting a wall in recent years? Personally speaking, I’m quite optimistic about the future of science and feel that there’s no limit to the beneficial discoveries that are in the future of research.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Spring is arriving earlier and earlier in the USA’s National Parks…and climate change is to blame.

What happens in the Atlantic has a direct effect on the weather in much of North America. “In recent years sensors stationed across the North Atlantic have picked up a potentially concerning signal: The grand northward progression of water along North America that moves heat from the tropics toward the Arctic has been sluggish.”

Like or not, our best intentions to control nature often backfire in our faces. “Taming The Mighty Mississippi May Have Caused Bigger Floods.”

One of the serious downsides to plastics is the fact that it is now making its way back into the food chain. “Hidden Plastics: Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Dunk A Tea Bag.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This excellent infographic explains all the benefits of the National Weather Service’s Doppler radar. When you consider it’s capabilities, it’s no wonder that it has saved so many lives.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

The 10 April marked the 39 anniversary of the Red River Tornado Outbreak…one of the most substantial outbreaks of the 1970’s which included the Wichita Falls F-4 tornado.

The urban heat island effect is something that this urbanite is very familiar with. Summer night-time temperatures can run 10-15F higher than at rural locations 30-40 miles away. Here’s an interesting read on how some overheated cities are taking steps to curb those oppressively hot nights.

Here’s some very important information from the NOAA National Hurricane Center on new products and services for 2018. This is very important for folks living in hurricane prone regions since changes have occurred to information that is meant for the general public.

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, doesn’t arrive until next month…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Last but not least, an infographic covering the major severe weather hazards you may encounter. Keep in mind that some hazards, such as heavy rain and lightning, are clear and present dangers even in NON-SEVERE thunderstorms.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

———————————————————————————

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For April 2 – 9, 2018

Greetings to one and all! This week’s post will focus on severe weather safety. Considering the peak of North American severe weather activity is upon us, I wanted to share some links that I hope are helpful in you and your family/friends in establishing a good severe weather safety plan. For example, do you know the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning? You’d be surprised at how many people don’t…and furthermore take the issuance of a Tornado Watch for their location with a potentially dangerous carefree attitude. The infographic below explains the difference and is just the tip of the iceberg on the information in this post. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re interested in weather and citizen science, the two links below are the best way to get a good start. Whats more, you can do them year round and from anywhere across the USA and Canada.

CoCoRaHS: Community Collaborative Rainfall, Hail, & Snowfall Network. “Volunteers working together to measure precipitation across the nations.” A FREE app is available for iOS and Android.

mPING: “Weather radars cannot “see” at the ground, so mPING reports are used by the NOAA National Weather Service to fine-tune their forecasts. NSSL uses the data in a variety of ways, including to develop new radar and forecasting technologies and techniques.” The mPING app is FREE and available for both iOS and Android.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past week marked the 44th anniversary of the April 3-4, 1974 Superoutbreak of tornadoes. In several parameters, it will hold many records for many, many years in the breadth and scope of one of the USA’s most devastating weather events.

The Xenia, OH F-5 was one of the deadliest and most devastating tornadoes of the April, 1074 Superoutbreak.

This week also marks the 71st anniversary of the Woodward, OK tornado…the deadliest tornado in OK state history.

WEATHER SAFETY

The list below, while not exhaustive, has a good plethora of potentially life saving severe weather safety information.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos: Violent Windstorms Of The Prairie

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY INFOGRAPHICS

The following infographics are helpful in that they concisely explain much of the information you hear on your local weather forecasts. Others simply give good ideas on how to get severe weather information and other important safety information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For March 26 – April 2, 2018

Greetings everyone! If spring is on the menu for your location, I hope that it’s meeting your expectations and the weather is clement in your area. For much of North America, spring also means the peak of the annual severe weather season. We’ll have a bit of safety info on that. There’s plenty of other topics to look over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Taking into consideration the recent events concerning social media, some are wondering if it can be saved from itself?

If you think that Facebook and Google have a lot of information on you, this article on just how much will make you even more wary about what you share.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news from NASA. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is in final preparations for its April 16 launch to, “find undiscovered worlds around nearby stars, providing targets where future studies will assess their capacity to harbor life.”
Here’s a question that we’ll likely never have the answer to. “Is Humanity Unusual In The Cosmos?”
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
A change in perspective can make an amazing difference. “Satellite Images From Highly Oblique Angles Are Pretty Mindblowing.”
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
For all the good it has done, the Paris Climate Accord has its flaws that need to be examined and debated closely. “The debate lies in exactly how the Paris climate target is defined and measured, which has not been precisely established.”
While not comprehensive or made for the advanced weather aficionado, this basic cloud guide is a good starting point for anyone with a basic interest in weather and wants to know more about how clouds can convey what’s happening in our atmosphere.
Signs of spring are finally showing up in Sweden where some locations, having gone without much sunlight for months, will get above freezing for the first time since last autumn.
The ice sheets in Greenland give us a clear idea of what is happening with climate change. Unfortunately, they’re melting at a rate faster than at any other time in 400 years.
WEATHER SAFETY
With the arrival of the severe weather season in North America, it’s time to prepare for some of the planet’s most volatile weather. Ready.gov has a good springboard for starting a family plan for many types of disasters.
Here’s a simple overview of the Storm Prediction Center’s severe weather risk categories, the extent of storms expected, and the impact that you should prepare for.
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/SPC
Your mobile device can be an invaluable source of severe weather information. Be sure to follow reliable and official sources of information.
Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS
PUBLIC POLICY
The current train wreck at the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency gets worse with every new story. Pruitt and company get more paranoid and histrionic every day.
While focused on Canada, it would not be surprising to see this come to fruition in many other countries. “‘We’re Talking Very Big Bucks’: New Bill Could Put Oil Companies On The Hook For Climate Change Costs.”
Last but not least, the current USA presidential administration intends to eliminate NASA’s climate research programs. “Critics say NASA’s Earth Science Division is a waste of taxpayer dollars and a distraction from the agency’s core mission of space exploration. But NASA has a critical role to play in understanding human-caused climate change, by operating satellites that monitor the earth’s forests, deserts, oceans and atmosphere.”
That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long time followers…near and far. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.
Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 20 – 26, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s spring here in the Northern Hemisphere and, in spite of the snow that still remains, many areas are greening and warming up nicely. Across the southern states and great plains of North America, the severe weather season has been off to a rather quiet start…but that could change. There’s always plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re incensed about the latest Facebook FUBAR, you’re not alone…and chances are your privacy was compromised in a major way. Stopping Facebook from tracking you isn’t easy, but with persistence it can be done.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

This amazing graphic could not have been made without the help of a nationwide network of citizen science. It’s a few words of encouragement for folks who are anxiously awaiting spring…but the amazing graphics are possible only through folks who collect data on blooming plants and trees in spring.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

More than a half-year after Hurricane Harvey devastated a large portion of Houston, (the USA’s fourth-largest city), the extent of the storm’s environmental impact is beginning to surface, while questions about the long-term consequences for human health remain unanswered.
An unsettling read about the massive plastic garbage patch in the Pacific ocean. Sadly, this patch is only one of several.
Regardless of where you live, this is good news…and hopefully new wind energy records will become commonplace.
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Though weather and climate are close in many ways, there are significant differences that are important to understand.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

The World Meteorological Organization has released a new State Of The Climate report. This is an important read (40 page PDF document) so settle in and get up to date on the latest in climate science.

Speaking of climate, it’s been a while since the IPCC issued its latest report. In the past five years, we’ve learned a lot about climate…here’s a great update.

There’s an irrevocable link between wildlife, nature, and climate. Nations fighting climate change must understand this in order to meet the requirements of the Paris Accord.

If you’ve got a lot of snow to move, might as well make a mountain out of it all. I wonder how long it’ll take for all of this to melt?

PUBLIC POLICY

Truth stranger than fiction. “Web of Power: Cambridge Analytica And The Climate Science Denial Network Lobbying For Brexit And Trump.”

Apparently someone who should know better is in desperate need of a refresher course on the scientific method. “Scott Pruitt Will Restrict The EPA’s Use Of Legitimate Science.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along!

Cheers!

—————————————————————————————-

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For March 12 – 20, 2018

Greetings to one and all! Due to yesterday’s severe weather episode across several southern states, I thought it would be best to delay today’s post by one day. Several southern states, Alabama in particular, took quite a beating from early severe weather season storms. It’s the time of year and it would behoove all of us who live in tornado prone regions to have our severe weather preparations and plans in place or close to completion. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

Here’s one of the most thought provoking essay/interviews I’ve read in some time. Cosmic Thinker Worries About Ends Of Science And Humanity.” Cosmologist Martin Rees holds forth on multiverses, biothreats, AI, utopia, God and “posthuman” science.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

The CoCoRaHS project is a great way for citizen scientists to get involved in collaborating in collecting valuable precipitation data.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Many broadcast meteorologists are getting some very creative and productive ideas to help them convey the importance of climate change to their viewers. “We are as close to a scientist as most Americans will ever get. People invite us into their living rooms. We have a responsibility to educate them on the facts.”

There are many misconceptions about meteorology that never seem to disappear. Dr. Marshall Shepherd addresses several in this excellent essay.

If the shoe fits, wear it…even if it takes a laugh to work! “Humor Can Get Young People Fired Up About Climate Change.”

It’s still a controversial idea, but the concept that warm spells in the Arctic has links to winter weather events in the eastern USA is gaining ground with new research. The study includes more than 60 years of data on U.S. weather and Arctic climate conditions, from 1950 to 2016.

Today, 20 March 2018, is the first day of “spring” in the Northern Hemisphere. What is the difference between meteorological and astronomical spring?

If you’re a cloud geek like me, you’ll get pretty excited about this! “The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has released its new, long-awaited, digitized International Cloud Atlas – the global reference for observing and identifying clouds, which are an essential part of weather, the climate system and the water cycle. It was released for the World Meteorological Day on 23rd March.”

The outlook for spring 2018 is out from NOAA for the USA. At the current time, it looks like much of the country could be above normal in temperatures. Keep in mind this is an outlook and not a forecast.

Map courtesy NOAA

The latest US Drought Portal shows 26.4% of the USA is experiencing dry/drought conditions as of March 7 – 13, 2018.  The latest US Drought Monitor shows extreme and exceptional drought conditions in the southern plains and four corners region. Parts of Oklahoma are particularly hard hit with Exceptional Drought conditions affecting some areas that have seen little to no rain in several months.

Map courtesy NOAA/US Drought Monitor

This past week marks the anniversary of the Tri-State Tornado…the deadliest tornado in USA history.

That’s a wrap for this post! Happy Spring for my followers in the Northern Hemisphere and for folks south of the equator, Happy Autumn!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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