Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links For Jan. 27 – Feb. 4, 2014

Winter certainly has not loosened its grip on the contiguous 48 United States. As of this post, one of several rounds of snow, sleet, and freezing rain were making a path from OK, KS, & TX to southern  ME. On the home front, I was invited by the folks at Kestrel Meters to write a guest post for their blog! So, let’s get started on this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Sublime magazine takes a look at the inherent uncertainties that will always be a part of all fields of science…and why so many people find that distressing.

A thought-provoking long-read that touches on so many topics; history, climatology, sociology, and much more.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Conveying complex scientific information to the layperson can be incredibly frustrating. Here are some helpful tips that could ease the pain.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

There’s plenty of snow to be measured while contributing to citizen science!

PHYSICS

What do swirling patterns on bubbles and hurricanes, tornadoes, and other atmospheric vortexes have in common?

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Was January cold in Alaska? Well, “cool” might be a better description since the USA’s largest state had record warmth.

How much snow does it take to cancel school? Here’s an interesting map that gives a general idea. Note: please see the links within the article with the writer’s caveats as to the map’s accuracy.

Weather can not only close schools, but take a toll on our roads.

The inimitable Chuck Doswell writes eloquently on the forecasters frustrations with specific relation to the recent winter storm that cripples much of the southern US.

Here’s a more personal, subjective viewpoint on the southern storm, “Why The South Fell Apart In The Snow.”

Can glaciers move fast? Yes they can…and the world’s fastest is located in Greenland.

Some very cool new technology from NASA will enable scientists to measure depth of sea ice and glaciers.

Why is there more methane in the Earth’s atmosphere? The sources are numerous.

Personally, I feel it’s time to reassess the Enhanced Fujita scale and the impact that remote sensing/portable high-resolution doppler radars can have on tornado intensity ratings.

Here’s a “spot-on” essay from meteorologist Dan Satterfield that cuts through the rubbish and exposes “The Great Facebook Blizzard – Storms and Rumors of Storms.”

Last, but definitely not least, I’m pleased to present a blog essay I’ve written for the awesome folks at Kestrel Meters. They were kind enough to invite me to write on the topic of becoming a storm spotter. Many folks are interested, but there’s a lot that you should be aware of. My feature, “A Beginner’s Guide To Skywarn Severe Weather Spotting” touches on a few topics that I hope are of value to you if you’re considering becoming a Skywarn spotter.  I’m also a big fan of Kestrel products and have used their 3000 and 4000 for many years and can’t recommend their line of products highly enough. Give them a visit…try one of their great meters out…and tell them I sent you. You won’t regret using a Kestrel. In terms of hand-held weather meters, they’re state-of-the-art…and made in the USA!

Have a great week everybody…stay warm and drive carefully!

Cheers!

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