Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links For May 20 – 27, 2014

This is traditionally a very busy time for me with many projects calling for attention as well as some very active weather…so this will be a very abbreviated post. If time allows, I may add a few links later in the week.

Here are this week’s links for your consideration…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

After many decades in citizen science, I can tell you it’s anything but weird and wild…but it’s certainly in it’s golden age with unbridled curiosity…and nothing but good things can come from that.

Popular Science has a list of 5 apps for a very cool citizen science summer.

If you’re into astronomy and citizen science, your help is needed in evaluating images from the Spitzer space telescope.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Apparently, Dimetrodon is not a dinosaur. The child paleontologist in me is crushed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Here’s a fascinating site from the USGS that shows the location of wind farms across the USA!

Across the Atlantic, Sweden is set to take the lead in Nordic wind power.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For the northern hemisphere, summer is on the doorstep. Summer heat kills more people every year that tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning, et al. combined. Here’s some very important information on this “silent killer.”

The Oklahoma and Texas panhandles, like many regions, are taking a shellacking from an relentless drought.

NOAA’s Carbon Tracker is a fascinating tool. Here’s a look a the details.

A look at Europe’s next generation of weather satellites.

The World Meteorological Organization is taking action on storm surges which kill more people that tropical cyclone winds or earthquake-generated tsunamis.

NOAA has issued their outlook (not a forecast) for the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season. Near normal or below normal number of tropical cyclones are expected. The caveat is the simple fact that it takes only one intense hurricane (i.e. Andrew) to devastate a region and cause billions in damage.

We’re at the 30th anniversary of the devastating Memorial Day flood in Tulsa, OK…the deadliest natural disaster in the city’s history. Here’s a look back from the Tulsa World and the Tulsa Nat’l Weather Service. To date, it’s the deadliest natural disaster in Tulsa’s history with 14 fatalities.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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