Monthly Archives: January, 2016

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For January 18 – 25, 2016

For much of the eastern USA, it’s been a very interesting week. A major snowstorm with blizzard conditions effected many states from the Mid-Mississippi valley to the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern states. When the going gets rough, you might as well have fun! On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Good news for citizen science folks into weather! The free mPING weather app is now global! Your important reports help with weather research. Check out the details here!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Astronomers are checking into the possibility of a “planet nine” in our solar system.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Do the safety impacts of using ice during a winter storm outweigh the negative long-term environmental impacts?

Scientists say that plastic may best define our current period within the Anthropocene. I’m inclined to agree.

The air quality of the UK has, as of late, taken on lethal proportions.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A spot on read on the climate change denier’s histrionics that rear their sophomoric heads during events like the USA’s recent snow event.

Based on NOAA and NASA data, 2015 was the hottest year on record. Will 2016 follow suit?

Millions of people across the USA are dealing with the aftermath of a massive snowstorm. Just how do all of those snowflakes form?

El Nino may bring welcome rains to drought plagued California, but it’s a mere drop in the bucket.

With the recent snowstorm/blizzard fresh in the minds (and everything else) of millions of folks in the eastern USA, I’d like to once again pass along some winter weather safety information that I hope you’ll find helpful.

Last but not least, some friendly advice. Always rely on trusted and official sources of weather information year round regardless of where you live. Obviously this includes NOAA’s National Weather Service but also should include the national an/or local broadcast meteorologists of your choice. It would behoove you to avoid the social media fear mongers, “hypesters”, and armchair meteorologists (often referred to as media-rologists since the growth of their social media is more important than timely and accurate information). The squeaky wheels get the grease and, unfortunately, it all too often isn’t official weather sources of potentially life-saving information. My opinion on this isn’t popular for the obvious reasons, but I stand by every word and feel it is very sound.

On that note, that’s a wrap for this post! A hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun and flattered that you’ve chosen to follow me.

Cheers!

 

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Winter Weather Safety Information

Over the next few days, a significant winter storm will be effecting many states from AR & TX eastward into the Mid-Atlantic coast and possibly New England. For your convenience, I’d like to pass along some information that I hope will be helpful to the folks involved.

For the latest forecasts, advisories, winter weather watches and warnings, check out the National Weather Service website.

From NOAA’s National Weather Service, here’s important winter weather safety information.

In addition, follow reliable broadcast meteorologists (national & local) of your choice & avoid the fear mongers and hypesters if possible.

Good luck and stay safe!

 

 

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For January 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope the new year is off to a good start for all of you. So far this year, at least for most of North America, it’s been a relatively tranquil winter. El Nino is still a big player on a larger scale, many of its effects are yet to be seen. There’s plenty of good news on the renewables front with wind power in particular taking a lot of steam out of the fossil fuels.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Of interest to users of the Windows OS. “Windows 8, Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, and 10 (mostly) consigned to the dustbin of history.”

Sometimes going offline is the best way to spend your time. I take regular breaks from the “online” world and highly recommend them!

PHYSICS

This has the potential to be big in the world of physics. “Rumors are rippling through the science world that physicists may have detected gravitational waves, a key element of Einstein’s theory which if confirmed would be one of the biggest discoveries of our time.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Say “Hello” to the Titanosaur, a species that may be the largest dinosaur ever discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very nice primer on fracking…explained plain and simple.

This was inevitable, and completely justified. “Oklahoma Residents Sue Earthquake Companies Over Earthquake Damage.”

A look at an underrated health hazard. “Shock figures to reveal deadly toll of global air pollution.”

An interesting look at the geology/climate connection. “Growth rings on rocks give up North American climate secrets.”

Ah, the good old days…they weren’t really all that good.

There are only five countries than can be held responsible for up to sixty percent of the plastic pollution in our oceans.

Here’s some awesome renewables news. “Wind power supplied 97% of electricity needs of Scottish households in 2015.”

Even in an oil state like Texas, wind power is making it’s mark and setting records.

If you live in an urban environment and ever needed a reason to plant a tree or two (or a dozen), here’s your excuse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A long-awaited upgrade will triple the forecasting computing power of the USA’s National Weather Service.

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on Hurricane Alex, a rare January, 2016 tropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

Here’s an impressive view of Hurricane Alex from NASA.

Could the ongoing El Nino lead to a below average number of tornadoes across the USA for 2016?

Not so long ago, the ozone hole was the talk of the atmospheric sciences. What happened to it?

There’s a strong correlation between the recent record breaking floods and rains in the UK and climate change.

A list of ten climate related records that you don’t necessarily want to have broken.

JUST FOR FUN

As the saying goes, “When In Rome…” Or, in this case, my beloved Sweden in winter... 🙂

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Jan. 4 – 12, 2016

If the December, 2015 holiday season seemed tepid in the Northern Hemisphere, you weren’t imagining things. It was an unusually warm December across much of North America with heavy rains and even deadly tornadoes making their appearance late in the month. But, the USA wasn’t the only area effected by significant weather events as 2015 drew to a close. Many parts of the UK were dealt a hefty blow by devastating floods. On the brighter side, with COP21 having wrapped up, the countries of our humble home now have a template to go by in regards to climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Astronomy fans will love this amazing image of the universe that captures its often difficult to comprehend immensity.

For those with big egos and/or think that our human populated Earth is the center of mythological monotheism, here are seven incredible facts about our universe that are worth serious consideration.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE/

Was the Christian Science Monitor trying for an interesting headline or are they seriously doubting overwhelming scientific evidence?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Check out these amazing satellite imagery of our humble home during December, 2015.

The 2015 USA wildfire season set a very ominous record.

This horrible mess on a beach in England has to be seen to be believed.

Recycling is always the way to go, but there can be challenging tasks that go with it.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A spot on read that calls the bluff of many an attention hungry “mediarologists. “Don’t Trust An Internet Snowstorm Forecast More Than A Week Into The Future.”

The climate and biosphere of Antarctica aren’t easy to study. Here’s an interesting read on the mystery of Antarctica’s clouds.

Clouds play a bigger role in the melting of the Greenland ice sheet than was previously assumed.

While on the subject of ice, giant icebergs have shown to be effective at removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

If December, 2015 seemed unusually warm for many of you in the USA, you weren’t imagining things.

According to Met Office data, December, 2015 was the wettest month on record for the UK.

The current El Nino may have peaked in some respects, but it’s far from over.

In spite of conclusive and overwhelming evidence, the climate change denial machine ticks on. “The conservative thinktanks under the microscope are the main cog in the machinery of climate science denial across the globe, pushing a constant stream of material into the public domain.”

THE QUIXOTIC

Sound scientific evidence be damned! When a nefarious opportunist has enough money and clout to throw their weight around, they can afford to say, “The laws of the land don’t apply to me.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Dec. 29, 2015 – Jan 4, 2015

First and foremost, I’d like to wish all of my followers and readers a very Happy New Year! I hope the coming year brings you a wealth of new knowledge, good health, and a plethora of good times!

There’s a lot to be optimistic about in the coming year. In spite of ongoing obstacles, I’ve a strong intuitive sense that the best is yet to come for our generation and future ones.

This week’s post will have a few retrospective links taking a look back at various science stories of 2015…so on that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

From the American Association For The Advancement Of Science, a nice look back at their “best of 2015” science stories.

It’s hard to believe in 2016 that this is still and issue, but sadly it is. “Gender Equality In Science Will Require A Cultural Shift.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter has a new policy to ban hateful conduct, specifically terrorist groups.

A very disconcerting privacy and security read. “Recently Bought A Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Had Your Encryption Key.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Nice read on the Hubble telescope viewing the merger of two galaxies.

A fascinating retrospective. “‘Forgotten’ 19th Century Images of Eclipses, Stars, & Planets Found.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The “Quakegate” saga continues. Oklahoma State Rep on oil companies and earthquakes: “No one is taking this issue seriously.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In spite of some negatives, there were many positive environmental events during 2015.

A spectacular array of the top fifteen images of Earth from NASA taken during 2015.

More amazing NASA imagery of reading the English alphabet from space.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Hurricane Patricia is Climate Central’s image of the year. Considering the intensity of Patricia, it’s a sound choice!

A nice retrospective from Climate Central of their picks for the seven most interesting climate findings of 2015.

From Climate Reality, their take on the top climate moments of 2015.

Will 2016 be as warm as 2015? If the trend continues, the chances are good it will be as warm if not warmer.

A very thought-provoking read on four myths about how to deal with climate change.

El Nino may be responsible for havoc in some locations, but the folks in California see a positive side.

From Dr. Marshall Shepherd, a nice read on satellite vs. “ground” temperature readings.

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

For my fellow silent film fanatics…”The Most Risque Moments In Silent Cinema.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! See you folks next time!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

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