Monthly Archives: May, 2017

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For May 22 – 30, 2017

Greetings to everyone! If you celebrated the Memorial Day holiday, I hope the weather was to your liking and you were able to enjoy a long weekend. It’s a very special holiday for many as we take time to reflect on those who paid the ultimate sacrifice while serving their country. In an unofficial sense, it also marks the “beginning” of summer for many people. This past week also saw some robust severe weather events across North America. In addition, the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1st. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The atmosphere on the planet Jupiter is amazing with cyclonic storms the size of planets.

GEOGRAPHIC SCIENCE

Interesting new data from the USA Census Bureau. “The South Is Home To 10 Of The 15 Fastest-Growing Large Cities.” It’s also important to note that eleven (subjective opinion) of these cities live in areas that are vulnerable to tornado or hurricane activity.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Some very good renewables news from our friends in the UK. Solar power has just broken a UK record thanks to sunny weather!

Satellites aren’t just used for communications and weather data. There’s a wide variety of scientific disciplines that finds satellite data invaluable. Some possible changes in the future of satellites is somewhat disconcerting while being mildly encouraging.

Unless greenhouse gases are reduced dramatically in the near future, coral bleaching on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef will accelerate rapidly.

The 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) World Heritage-listed reef suffered its most severe bleaching on record last year due to warming during March and April.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The National Hurricane Center has released its outlook for the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. As of now, an above average year is expected. Keep in mind that many of these tropical cyclones will stay well out to sea and pose no threat to land, but that doesn’t mean anyone living in a hurricane prone region can take a lackadaisical attitude towards being in the path of a tropical storm or hurricane. Prepare now.

An interesting look behind-the-scenes at Colorado State University while they prepare their own predictions for the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season.

Here’s an excellent data base of tropical cyclones from NOAA with information going back to the 1850’s.

The GOES-16 weather satellite will be positioned as the GOES East in November 2017. Here’s a good page to take a look at some of the amazing satellite imagery loops available.

There’s been considerable improvement across the contiguous USA for drought conditions save for many parts of Florida and Georgia where extreme drought conditions persist.

One of the most underrated hazards of a thunderstorm is lightning. Every year, hundreds are killed and thousands injured (often permanently) by lightning strikes. What’s it like to be stuck and survive? Read this account to find out.

Many of you are aware of steps you can take to reduce your part of climate change. This list has dozens more and most of us can help. “100 Ways To Reverse Climate Change.”

What will our planet look like with 4 degrees Celsius warmer? Not pleasant.

There are some who don’t believe that our planet could become 4 degrees Celsius warmer and have the war chest to promote their propaganda. Fortunately, the National Center For Science Education (NCSE) has stepped in with educational materials that are firmly based in sound climate science.

PUBLIC POLICY

The awareness of the G7 countries of the hazards of climate change goes back to 2005. To weaken the USA’s position on the global scientific consensus would be politically and scientifically disastrous.

The USA’s Interior Department (in the current American presidential administration) removed (or censored) mention of climate change from a release on coastal flooding because, “It didn’t add anything.” How convenient.

If you have any remote interest in accurate weather forecasting for the USA, you’d better sit down for this one. “White House budget aims to “slow” gains in weather prediction, shocking forecasters.”

Climactically speaking, I couldn’t have said it better myself. “The world is in a mess. It is absolutely essential that the world implements the Paris Agreement.”

The current USA president has released a revised budget plan that would cut science programmes across the federal government in 2018. Biomedical, public-health, environmental, climate, and weather research would all be headed to the proverbial garbage disposal. The targets of this revised budget is a veritable “who’s who” in science research and development.

THE QUIXOTIC

By one account, apparently physics is “oppressive.” It’s not a little obvious that some people have far too much time on their hands.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! This entire endeavor is run on a “shoe-string-budget” and has been a labor of love for me since 1998. Although the primary focus is on atmospheric science, I would be greatly remiss to not share information regarding other fields of science, especially those in the environmental areas as well as renewable energy and related public policy. Ultimately, they’re all connected in various facets.

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Advertisements

Tornado Quest Science Links Of The Week In Review For May 15 – 22, 2017

Greetings to all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are! It’s been a very busy week across much of the USA plains states this past week with several days of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. The beginning of the Atlantic hurricane season is also right around the corner. If you live in a hurricane prone region, this is the ideal time of year to prepare for the storm that we hope you won’t see. This week’s post is a bit on the brief side due to several active days of severe weather but still has plenty of topics of interest…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Frequently, I will get inquiries as to how people can get involved in citizen science. SciStarter is a great place to begin with something for everyone.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

An interesting read on focusing on the “bigger picture” instead of minutiae details in improving STEM student learning and comprehension.

For science teachers, here’s a very good read from meteorologist Dan Satterfield with a very nice Teacher’s Guide To Climate Change. The link in the article will take you to a FREE copy of the guide.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Fortunately no seeds were lost, but the irreplaceable stronghold of the world’s seeds was flooded by conditions attributed to climate change.

If you need some “eye candy,” look no further than the amazing planet we live on. Here’s a gallery of fifty-one amazing images of our humble home.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With the North American severe weather season in full swing and the hurricane season just around the corner, now’s the time to double check your NOAA weather radio to make sure it’s in proper working order and, among other preparations, make a good emergency communication plan. If you’re wondering about the NOAA weather radio coverage for your area, check out this map for more information.

Are “High Risk” areas in Storm Prediction Center outlooks becoming more common? Actually, no…but the forecasting is becoming far more accurate.

What are the calendar dates with the most and fewest tornadoes? US Tornadoes takes a look at some very interesting tornado data.

Less than a year after previous one, the Pacific Ocean is possibly going with another El Niño event.

Globally, April 2017 was the second highest for the month of April going back to 1880. The 2017 year-to-date global temperature was also the second warmest on record.

The World Meteorological Organization has compiled a list of world records for the highest reported historical death tolls from hail storms, tornadoes, lightning, tropical cyclones.

Check out these amazing views of thunderstorms captured by a pilot. You don’t get views like this on every flight.

Having been a storm chaser since March, 1982, I have seen the avocation turn from a small community of perhaps 200 nationwide to a free-for-all circus. This article on the chaser traffic jam (and traffic jam is being much too polite) is a good starting point on addressing the challenges.

PUBLIC POLICY

The uncertainty of this scenario is exceptionally disturbing. Considering the current political trends in the USA, it should come as no surprise. “Will The Government Help Farmers Adapt To A Changing Climate?

There were impressive numbers for world-wide attendance on the April 2017 March For Science.


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For May 8 – 15, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. The past few days have seen a substantial uptick in severe weather activity across the plains states of the USA. We’ve still many weeks of severe weather potential ahead of us…so keep an eye on your local forecasts. Hurricane Preparedness Week has officially wrapped up, but don’t let your guard down. Now is an excellent time to prepare for the storm you hope never happens. There’s much more to go over…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

When corporate interests are heavily involved in or sponsor research, it’s understandable why public trust in the research results drops like a lead balloon.

There are a few things that science may never have the answers to. Getting comfortable with the unknown, adaptation, and not living in a ‘black-or-white’ world is all part of understanding and appreciating the sciences.

In spite of the convenience of digital ebooks, there’s nothing like turning the pages of a real book.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Why do we build super telescopes? Our thirst for knowledge is just one reason.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Atlanta, GA is the twenty-seventh city in the USA to pledge to be powered by renewables.

Here’s some more good renewables news. “Gemini windpark off the coast of the Netherlands will eventually meet the energy needs of about 1.5 million people.”

Some very challenging times ahead for the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency. “The Environmental Protection Agency has a clear, one-sentence mandate: “The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The NWS Hurricane Preparedness Week has drawn to a close…but it’s still the perfect time to prepare and be ready. It only takes one storm.

If severe weather is forecast for your area, do you know what the Storm Prediction Center’s (SPC) tornado probabilities mean? Here’s an excellent explanation your tornado risk in SPC outlooks from Weather Decision Technologies.

After a brutal drought across much of the USA, relief has finally come (for the time being) and the drought coverage is the lowest since 2000.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows significant improvement over many areas that were previously dry while drought conditions in Florida and Georgia continue to worsen.

A very interesting climate read about a new study. “Emissions from thawing permafrost are now outpacing the uptake of carbon dioxide during the growing season.”

The link between climate change and public health is very real and irrevocable. “Climate Change Could Increase ER Visits For Allergy-related Asthma.”

According to an analysis for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) our humble home could see the goal to limit warming to 1.5°C easily surpassed within a decade.

A bittersweet “Happy Birthday” to the temperature spiral showing the rise of global temperatures thanks to humanity’s release of heat-trapping greenhouse gases.

For parts of the Rio Grande river in New Mexico, low water levels are a direct result of reduced snowfall which can be traced to warming temperatures.

An interesting read on the joint project between social networks and the role they play in decision-making about climate change adaptation.

Finally, a very thought-provoking read. “A Parable From Down Under For U.S. Climate Scientists.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. And for folks in hurricane prone regions, I hope your hurricane preparedness actions are going according to plan. Hopefully, you’ll not have to use them.

Cheers!

————————————————————————————–

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For May 1 – 8. 2017 #HurricaneStrong

Hurricane Preparedness Week #HurricaneStrong has started for the USA. This week’s focus will be on preparing for these powerful storms. If you live in a hurricane prone region, now is the time to prepare. There are numerous websites from the National Weather Service, the American Red Cross, and FEMA that have helpful information.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

With the current USA’s Environmental Protection Agency now out of the climate science business, here are some good resources to keep yourself informed.

Here’s some very good renewables news. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), a new wind turbine was installed every two and a half hours in the United States during the first quarter of 2017.

Arbor Day may only officially be celebrated once a year, but in reality every day can be arbor day.

In spite of improvements in many countries, air pollution still is a substantial public health issue round the world with developing countries having the most troubles.

The contentious atmosphere (no pun intended) surrounding the current presidential administration, the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues with nefarious overtones.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

It’s Hurricane Preparedness Week in the USA from May 7 – 13, 2017. Now is the time to get prepared if you live in a hurricane prone region. The National Weather Service has a comprehensive hurricane preparedness website with all the information you need. On Twitter, you can also follow @NWS along the #hurricanePrep #HurricaneStrong & #ItOnlyTakesOne hashtags for more information.

Here’s a very nice infographic from the National Weather Service with a plethora of information on the WSR-88D weather radars that are an invaluable part of the forecasting and warning process.

NOAA has a very useful tool you can use to find out how climate change will affect your neighborhood.

Taking into consideration the recent changes in the Antarctic ice shelves, a major break could be imminent.

A slower rise in global temperatures from 1998 to 2012 has been hailed by climate change denialists as proof that Earth’s climate isn’t changing and future projections are irrelevant. In fact, new data show that the “hiatus” has no impact on long-term climate change projections.

Big changes in the broadcast meteorology field with the minority finally becoming the majority. Broadcast meteorologists are coming to the inevitable conclusion that they’re not only the only scientists their viewers will ever see on television, but that climate change is now a part of the essential information they must convey to their viewers.

The recent drought in California may be linked to a newly identified climate pattern.

This past week marked the eighteen anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas and Oklahoma tornado outbreak, the largest outbreak to date in the history of Oklahoma. The National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, OK has a comprehensive retrospective with a wealth of information. And yes, it can and will happen again.

This past week also marked the tenth anniversary of the Greensburg, KS EF-5 tornado. Thanks to fast and effective warnings from the Dodge City, KS National Weather Service and good coverage by broadcast meteorologists, many people had plenty of warning. A few decades ago, a tornado of this magnitude would have resulted in dozens of fatalities.

We’ve not heard the last of this for a long, long time. “New York Times Wants To Offer Diverse Opinions. But On Climate, Facts Are Facts.”

Finally, some helpful lightning safety information courtesy the National Weather Service office in Burlington, VT. Every year approximately thirty people are killed and hundreds injured in the USA alone from lightning. Most if not all of these deaths and injuries are avoidable.

That’s a wrap for this post…see you next time!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 23 – May 1, 2017

Greetings one and all…and Happy May Day! It’s a time for many of us of Scandinavian ancestry to celebrate the arrival of summer after a dark winter. Njut av semestern och låt oss fira ankomsten av den varma sommaren! Ironically, this past winter in many areas of the Northern Hemisphere had a very mild winter with subfreezing temperatures and normal snowfall being the exception to the rule. This past week brought several rounds of severe weather with tornadoes, flash flooding, and high winds being responsible for a considerable amount of damage from Texas through Oklahoma into Arkansas. Keep in mind that, from a climatological perspective, May is the most active month across North America for tornadoes. Those of us who live in tornado-prone areas should be at the ready. This week’s review will be shorter than usual due to the severe weather, but there’s plenty to cover so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Here’s a nice examination of ten common misconceptions in physics…and all sciences overall.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into citizen science and weather, your mobile device is the ideal too for the mPING project. It’s an easy to use FREE app for iOS and Android where you can send in a weather report and help the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in research!

Here’s a great starting point for several citizen science projects from SciStarter and The Crowd And The Cloud.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Cassini spacecraft is the first to ever be this close to the planet Saturn…and in the process, took some amazing images.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

An eye-opening look at water quality issues posed by fracking from American Scientist.

Here’s some encouraging news on the renewables front. “Last year, the solar industry employed many more Americans than coal, while wind power topped 100,000 jobs.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

On the sixth anniversary, a look back at the April 25 – 28, 2011 tornado outbreak.

The Arctic is reacting to climate change faster than climate scientists had anticipated.

A gut-punching look at the crazy scale of human carbon emissions.

In an ironic twist, two years after the Paris Climate Agreement, several developing countries are bypassing far wealthier nations in climate change policy.

The New York Times has hired a notorious climate change denialist and is publishing his material. Understandably, scientists are having none of this. The reaction is not surprising. “Bret Stephens’ first piece for the Times showed exactly why some climate realists are canceling their subscriptions.”

Being taken seriously in regards to climate change has its benefits and hazards…especially when you’re considering ideas that are well “out of the box.”

TED talks are almost always enlightening and/or entertaining. Finally (after what seems like forever), here’s one on clouds and climate change.

PUBLIC POLICY

This past weekend’s Climate March was a very good start…let’s keep the momentum going!

Not by conincidence, the EPA under Scott Pruitt wiped all climate change information and data from it’s website. No nefarious agenda here, just the “new” business as usual.

Propaganda is nothing new. But the study of how it’s used and how humans react to it is an interesting look into human behavior.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. If you have comments or suggestions, feel free to contact me at tornadoquest@protonmail.ch…and have a great week!

Cheers!

————————————————————————————

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

%d bloggers like this: