Monthly Archives: July, 2017

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For July 10 – 18, 2017

Greetings once again to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We get visitors from all over the world…and for some of you, it’s winter. For those of us in North America, it is incredibly hot across much of the continent with no let-up in sight. One would think they’d get used to this kind of wretched heat, but that’s not the case…at least for me. Stay safe if you’ve got to be out in the heat. As for tropical cyclone activity, the eastern Pacific and Atlantic are active for the moment, but fortunately none of the ongoing areas of concern as of this date are of any significant threat. Then again, this is only July and the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season is still several weeks away. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re looking for an excellent citizen science project for home, work, or school, check out the CoCoRaHS project!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’re getting some spectacular images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot…a massive storm that has been in progress for hundreds of years.

Space isn’t empty…and it certainly isn’t a quiet place.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Though this study linking ozone pollution and cardiovascular health was done on Chinese adults, it most certainly applies to cities all over the globe.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A new and important National Oceanographic And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report has just been issued. Our humble home had its second warmest year to date and its third warmest June on record.

Some recent severe weather research has had some interesting results in Oklahoma. An experimental model predicted the path of a Oklahoma tornado a few hours before it formed.

Here’s a look at the latest US Drought Monitor. Severe and Extreme conditions continue to worsen in Montana and the Dakotas.

Conveying climate change information to the general public is a daunting task. Moving beyond doomsday reporting is essential if atmospheric scientists are to gain the public trust.

Certain locations in the USA will be affected by climate change much earlier than others. Here’s a look at some particularly vulnerable coastal areas.

Many people wonder if their individual actions can make a difference in climate change. Fortunately, I can answer in the affirmative. There are many things you can do to make a difference.

Now that you know what you can do, check out how old you are in CO2.

Eighteen military installations vital to the protection and security of the USA are endangered by climate change.

From a global perspective, the extreme heat that is felt with increasing frequency could become the climatological norm.

Interesting video of one of the most intriguing entrepreneurs you can meet. “Richard Branson, the founder and chair of the Virgin Group speaks during a panel discussion in New York and says the threat of climate change actually offers ‘one of the great opportunities for this world’.”

This is an old story that has been raised from the dead…most likely for hyperbole since it’s been a non-issue issue from the get go. “Female-named hurricanes are most likely not deadlier than male hurricanes.”

PUBLIC POLICY

Understandably so, many countries are expressing well-deserved dismay on the USA’s threat to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

This should come as no surprise to Oklahomans who know him so very well. “Scott Pruitt Pretty Much Just Confirmed He’s Out To Dismantle The EPA.”

Socioeconomic ramifications of climate change are significant and require far more attention than they’re presently getting. Recent studies show that, “the pain of climate change will fall more heavily on America’s poorest bits than on its richest areas.”

If you want to help make the world a better place, collective action is much more effective than ineffectual individualism. As the saying goes, “there is power in numbers.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and invite you to check out Tornado Quest’s other social media outlets listed below. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Interesting times ahead…so stick around for the fray!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 3 – 10, 2017

Greetings again to one and all!  I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you live. Here in the Great Plains of the USA, the summer heat has settled in. It’s not unusual, but this weather geek never gets used to it. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

A very thought provoking essay on concerns with how science is taught in our classrooms.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Would you like some citizen science to go along with your sun, sand, and surf? You’ve got it…right here!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Many had hopes that life could exist on Mars. Those hopes were dashed as the surface of the “red planet” is more than a little uninhabitable.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

We are forced to adapt and confront the fact that the largest expanse of coral reefs in the world is dying before our eyes.

While challenging and forcing you to face old habits, becoming plastic free as possible is not that difficult.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

June 2017 was another warm month for the planet in general and specifically in parts of the southwestern USA, western Europe, and Siberia.

Global surface air temperature anomaly for June 2017 relative to the June average for the period 1981-2010. Source: ERA-Interim. (Credit: ECMWF, Copernicus Climate Change Service)

A look at mean temperature percentile for the contiguous USA for June 2017. (Credit: NOAA National Centers For Environmental Information)

A chunk of ice about the size of the state of Delaware is about to break off in Antarctica. When it does break off, it will be one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.

There are many ideas regarding ice loss in Antarctica (which is normal for properly conducted science) and that can seem overwhelming to the lay public. Here’s a good overview on what to believe about the Antarctic ice loss.

Speaking of Antarctica, its ice-free areas are predicted to reach proportions that will affect the unique animal life and terrestrial plant life that exists there.

While a great deal of attention is given to Antarctica, Greenland is going though an equally disturbing amount of melting directly linked to climate change.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows drought conditions spreading rapidly in the Dakotas and Montana. Moderate drought continues in parts of Arizona, California, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

A great read from meteorologist Dan Satterfield: Yet Another Climate Myth Is Gone.

How hot could your city get by the year 2100? Taking heat island effects into consideration, far hotter than you’ll want your grandchildren to endure.

Last but not least, a quick reminder of summer Heat Safety. Deaths from summer heat are preventable with a few simple steps.

PUBLIC POLICY

A particularly disturbing read…especially in the context that this has been done in a deliberately clandestine manner. “Trump’s Alarming Environmental Rollback: What’s Been Scrapped So Far.”

EPA head Scott Pruitt feels climate science is broken and needs to be fixed. That’s rich.

Here’s an excellent essay on how climate change denialism has turned into something far darker and more dangerous than previously thought. “Their goal is to sow uncertainty in the public mind about what the science shows.” These nefarious interests are, when it comes down to brass tacks, trying to convey a sense of confusion amongst the general public.

In spite of the fact that a vast majority of earth scientists feel we are on the brink of sinking into the abyss of a new Dark Age, a few are standing up and fighting back.

The G20 summit has ended on a very dour note…which could have been avoided altogether if the USA had an administration capable of comprehending science and diplomacy. “Our world has never been so divided.” “Centrifugal forces have never been so powerful. Our common goods have never been so threatened.” – French President Emmanuel Macron

A former Republican congressman and noted climate change denialist has been picked to be the head of the infamous Heartland Institute. Surprised?

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 26 – July 3, 2017

Greetings to one and all! For my fellow Americans, Happy Independence Day! “Resolved: That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.”

If you’ve never read the full text of the United States Declaration Of Independence, you can read it here. Few people realize that in addition to declaring independence of the colonies, the vast majority of this historical document is a twenty-eight count indictment of the British Crown. A very bold move indeed considering that, at the time, Great Britain was one of the world’s superpowers.

Due to the holiday and ongoing commitments, this will be an abbreviated post for this week. Regardless, there are still several interesting topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

For fellow astronomy fans, check out these amazing images.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The healing of the ozone layer could be delayed for 30 years or more by rising emissions that were previously ignored.

This is a world-wide problem that can only be alleviated to any degree by less reliance of plastics, recycling, and development of alternative container products. “Tackling The Plastic Bottle Crisis And Our Wider Disregard For Nature.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a detailed look at May 2017 tornado activity in the USA from NOAA’s National Center For Environmental Information. “According to data from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center during May, there were 290 preliminary tornado reports. This is near the 1991-2010 average of 276 for the month. This is the most tornadoes to impact the U.S. during any month since May 2015 when there were over 380 confirmed tornadoes. On May 16th, a large tornado outbreak hit the central U.S. and there were two tornado-related fatalities — one on Oklahoma and one in Wisconsin.”

The Jarrell, TX F-5 tornado of 27 May 1997 was a watershed event in tornado research and, along with the Oklahoma City metro F-5 tornado of 3 May 1999 was instrumental in spearheading development of the Enhanced Fujita Scale. Here’s a look back at the Jarrell event from May 2017 on its twentieth anniversary.

Does climate have an effect on human behavior? Absolutely…and much more than many care to admit. “Why Summer Makes Us Lazy.”

Speaking of heat, the recent heatwave in the western USA gives strong signals about climate change and associated budget cuts.

PUBLIC POLICY

It’s sad but true that soundly established scientific facts don’t matter to climate change deniers. Their personal agendas carry greater weight.

Nothing good can come of this. “Who Needs Peer Review When You Can Pruitt Review Climate Science?”

At the bipartisan U.S. Conference of Mayors, 1,400 USA city mayors committed to taking the lead on climate change.

Summer heat is responsible for a large number of weather related deaths each year in the USA. Compliance with the Paris Climate Agreement could help the largest urban areas in the USA and other countries reduce the annual number of excess deaths on summer days.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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