Monthly Archives: November, 2017

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For November 20 – 27, 2017

Greetings everyone and thanks for stopping by! If you celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday last week, I hope it was a good one. Winter is slowly settling in across much of the Northern Hemisphere with a mild start for most of North American while parts Scandinavia have had significant early snowfalls. As usual, there are several topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this weeks links…

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A disconcerting read on the recent increase of waste-water injection related earthquakes across much of Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

As someone who has strong concerns and opinions regarding the Earth’s environment, I do everything possible to reduce my carbon footprint. Unfortunately, no one can do everything possible. Fortunately, what you can do counts. Don’t stress over perfection…every little action counts.

An excellent read on nature’s response to the recent wildfires in California. “Damage from the Tubbs fire in October now presents a rare opportunity to learn about the behavior of wildfire, its ecological aftermath and how we live with fire.”

Attention wine lovers…which would include me. We don’t yet know all the details regarding the biochemistry of how wildfire smoke contaminates wine. Yes, that is something for wine connoisseurs and wine growers to be concerned about.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Ice Apocalypse” is an excellent essay by Eric Holthaus. The potential flooding dangers from sea level rise and melting glaciers isn’t a passing fad or the “flavor of the month.” This is a proven threat to coastal cities.

The threat to coastal cities from sea level rise has a clear connection to where the ice melts.

The latest Drought Monitor shows approximately 15% of the contiguous USA is experiencing extreme/exceptional drought conditions.

Here’s a look at the latest 2017 tornado statistics from the Storm Prediction Center. Overall…2017 was slightly above “average” year with a preliminary count of just over 1500 tornadoes as of late November 2017.

The map of tornado distribution shows a fairly typical pattern. Tornado reports are often tied to land-falling tropical cyclones, population centers, and localized outbreaks. The dense concentration of tornado reports from eastern Texas into the Southeastern states is a result of the very active Atlantic hurricane season. Many small tornadoes associated with squall lines, isolated storms over sparsely populated/remote areas during darkness, small “gustnadoes” along leading edges of thunderstorms, etc. are never counted and probably add up to 50-200 unreported weak tornadoes annually across the contiguous USA. It’s of interest to note the tornadoes that occurred in the states of Maine, Oregon, et al…states that are not typically associated with severe thunderstorms and tornadoes…which is proof that no USA state or Canadian province is completely immune to tornadoes.

Finally, here’s an interesting read on the quandary of politics and climate change by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. In spite of climate science evidence, attitudes were closely linked to party affiliation.

That’s a wrap for this post! Here’s a warm “welcome” to my new followers in social media. We’re certainly living in interesting times…so I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 13 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you are. Across North America, it’s been rather quiet as of late…but with winter just around the corner, that won’t last long. One of the biggest stories of the past week has been the Paris Climate Agreement conference held in Bonn, Germany. There’s a link in this week’s post that’ll give you a quick overview. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Network Theory…a part of “big data” that anyone with an interest in the sciences should be familiar with.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

It’s not too early to mark your calendars for Citizen Science Day which will take place on 14 April 2018!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’ve seen ourselves in the heavens.” A large spiral galaxy 180 million light years from Earth resembles the Milky Way and has a pair of interacting galaxies that look like our galaxy’s two brightest satellites.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

While this essay on recycling is very thought provoking, it doesn’t really offer any sound solutions or remedies to our current recycling challenges…which is what we need now more than ever.

Speaking of recycling, electronic waste (aka e-waste) is on the rise globally…and there’s no end in sight as manufacturers keep making products that are meant to be disposable instead of repairable.

At the ongoing Paris Climate Summit, the USA’s agenda has been focused on advocating fossil fuels. Needless to say, this has not gone over well.

The “Quakegate” in Oklahoma just got more interesting. Can’t help but wonder who the “Deep Throat” is in this exceptionally disturbing scenario. There’s certainly a Liddy on the loose.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s some exciting news for weather data. NASA has just launched a new weather satellite that, along with existing satellites, give atmospheric scientists amazing forecasting data.

Here’s a concise overview of the latest Paris Climate Agreement conference (COP23) held in Bonn, Germany.

Here’s a striking visualization from NASA of 20 years of global data on climate change.

This is a fascinating study from National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Due to climate change, North American storm clusters could produce up to 80% more rainfall and pose a significantly larger flooding threat.

NASA had recently developed a tool that indicated how much sea level rise coastal cities can expect based on degree of ice melt and the city’s location.

Finally, from the Popular Science archives: Where In The United States Is Nature Most Likely To Kill You. It’s a complicated answer but in terms of severe weather, ‘hurricanes are the most expensive disaster, while severe weather (including tornadoes) has claimed the highest number of fatalities.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Feel free to check out social media links below and, if you’re so inclined, follow along and join the fray.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 6 – 13, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I’m glad you stopped by and hope the weather is to your liking whether it’s autumn or spring in your location. As of this post, much of North America is relatively quiet with autumn settling in nicely across most of the continent. Fortunately, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is winding down quickly…and after such a destructive year, that’s very good. Let’s get started on this week’s selection.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

No, this isn’t “new” news. Yes, we’ve been dealing with it since 2016. But is it any wonder that Instagram and Twitter, having become a morass of shills, hucksters, and “beautiful people” have become very clique-oriented and useless to the average user? This paragraph says it all…

“Remixing the feed will make Instagram less useful as a real-time content feed because the most recent posts won’t necessarily be at the top. Users will have to worry about making their posts good enough to be chosen by the algorithm or their posts could be de-prioritized. And brands might lose the reach of a previously reliable marketing channel, the same way they did with Facebook Pages.” – TechCrunch

All hail the mighty algorithm. If, like me, you wish you understand and then disable the algorithm, you may have to research each individual social media entity (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et al.) since there’s no “one size fits all” solution to this challenge.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Your smart phone is the only tool you’ll need to help this awesome citizen science project that tracks mosquitoes.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Studying an active volcano is obviously dangerous. Fortunately, this is where a drone can “step” in and help.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The pollution released by recent wildfires across the USA is making Americans sick and undermining decades of progress in cleaning the air.

Trees are good for the environment in so many different ways…and helping to clean the air we breathe is only one.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a look at October 2017 in the USA. “October’s nationally averaged temperature was 55.7 degrees F, 1.6 degrees above average, which placed it among the warmest third of the historical record.”

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Unfortunately, recent data shows that carbon emissions worldwide are still on the rise.

In spite of the frequent dour news we hear regarding climate change, there are some bright lights that are worth looking at.

Long-term forecasts such as this are a bit risky, but interesting nonetheless. “Sweden’s Big Cities Predicted To Have Coldest Winter In Five Years.”

PUBLIC POLICY

In spite of “official” stances…”US states, cities and businesses signed up to ‘America’s pledge’ to combat global warming have a combined economic power equal to the world’s third-biggest economy.”

No further comment needed on this. “The Senate Just Approved Trump’s Pic For NASA Chief. You Can Probably Guess What He Thinks About Climate Change.”

The “pushback” from climate change denialists is getting more desperate by the day.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. You’ll find links to all our social media below…our Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram are the most active accounts. We’d be glad to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 30 – November 6, 2017

Greetings everyone! There’s plenty of topics to review this week with the biggest story being the latest National Climate Assessment…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Communicating science can be challenging enough but bring trolls into the mix, and you’ve got quite a toxic brew. Fortunately, these nefarious interlopers can be taken down more than a few notches.

Here’s an excellent segment from the 3 November 2017 edition of Science Friday that is a “must-listen” – “Defending Science In A ‘Post-Truth’ Era.”

Convincing the general public that the environment is an important factor in our health, quality of life, economics, et al, is not easy…but some studies are showing hope.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Time for many folks to switch to Standard Time…and while you’re at it, switch to LED light bulbs. I’ve been using them for some time and can’t recommend them highly enough.

Here’s a “head scratcher” read that makes you wonder. “Blocking The Sun”: New Report Documents Efforts To Undermine Rooftop Solar.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) was released on 3 November 2017. “This report is an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States. It represents the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990.”

This is a nice concise summary of the climate assessment that gives you the most important points.

Nations are urged to step up ambitions to cut emissions as floods, hurricanes, et al. are being linked to climate change.

Here’s a summary from the National Hurricane Center of the very busy 2017 Atlantic hurricane season to date.

The latest NOAA outlook for November shows warmer than usual temperatures for much of the southern contiguous USA and northern Alaska.

Here’s a look at November’s precipitation outlook. Please keep in mind that these are outlooks and not forecasts. Local deviations can and will occur. 

As for drought conditions, much of the USA is in decent shape save for portions of South Dakota and Montana.

COP23 will be taking place in Bonn, Germany on November 6, 2017 for the next round of United Nations climate talks. Here are four signs to watch for that are critical issues.

An Antarctic research station is preparing to close as cracks in the nearby ice shelf are growing. I wouldn’t stay around either.

While ice shelves are developing cracks, global warming is also a significant threat to major cities the world over. Why? Simple. These cities will literally drown.

Could we have a new world record for the lowest recorded barometric (atmospheric) pressure?

Nothing good can come of this. “Understaffed National Weather Service Scales Back Balloon Launches That Collect Vital Forecast Data.”

PUBLIC POLICY

The train wreck continues. “Pruitt Takes Steps To Remove Science From Decisions Affecting The Health Of American Families.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s good to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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