Monthly Archives: December, 2017

Tornado Quest Science Links For December 23 – 30, 2017

Greetings everyone and Happy Holidays! I hope everyone had a good holiday season regardless of whether you were celebrating or not. This will be a shorter post than usual, but covers many important topics…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION/CRITICAL THINKING

This kind of essay will never go out of style. “How To Convince Someone When Facts Fail.”

I couldn’t have said this better myself. “People are very good at finding ways to believe what we want to believe. Climate change is the perfect example – acceptance of climate science among Americans is strongly related to political ideology. This has exposed humanity’s potentially fatal flaw. Denying an existential threat threatens our existence.” Fortunately, scientists may have a solution to the problem of ideology superseding sound scientific facts.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Unearthed has a thorough collection of their favorite environmental journalism of 2017.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The current cold weather across North America (as of this post on 30 December 2017) is being used by climate change denialists to refute solidly established scientific facts. Here’s an excellent response to that from Dr. Marshall Shepherd.

The latest USA Drought Monitor is out. As of 28 December 2017, 22.1% of the USA and 26.4% of the lower 48 states were experiencing drought conditions.

If you’re looking to stay safe this winter, here’s a good place to start. The National Severe Storms Laboratory has a very comprehensive overview of winter weather safety.

In climate change, many of 2016’s records were surpassed in 2017 with emissions and temperatures rising globally. Here’s a review of 7 climate findings of 2017 from Scientific American.

2017 was an active year across the USA for tornadoes. US Tornadoes has a nice collection of, in their opinion, the top tornado videos of 2017. Of this selection, the best videos are those that show not only the tornado, but storm structure as well. These have what it takes to be worthy of scientific merit rather than “extreme” hyperbole videos that are little more than histrionics.

Finally, here are some links with winter weather safety information. Winter weather hazards should be taken as seriously as threats from severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media and wish everyone a very Happy New Year!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For December 16 – 23, 2017

Happy Holidays & “astronomical winter” greetings to one and all! If you’re celebrating, I hope your holiday season is going well. Due to the holidays, this will be an abbreviated post, but has some information that I hope will benefit you, especially in understanding winter weather terms. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s a good read in the critical thinking realm that sets the foundation for many a lively (if not contentious) conversations. If you present facts to someone that are contrary to their beliefs, will they change their mind? We’d like to think so, but chances are they won’t.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a very informative info-graphic from the Storm Prediction Center on winter weather conditions, how they form, and what impacts they can have on you.

Info-graphic courtesy Storm Prediction Center

The latest Global Climate Assessment from NOAA shows our planet had its fifth warmest November on record and its third warmest year to date.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Taking into consideration climate change that will occur in the coming decades, here’s a chilling view of a hypothetical scenario of a major hurricane hitting Miami, Florida in the year 2037.

It’s not likely that the Arctic will ever be the same again. “Using 1,500 years of natural records compiled from lake sediments, ice cores, and tree rings as context, the NOAA report says the Arctic is changing at a rate far beyond what’s occurred in the region for millennia.”

This sounds counter-intuitive, but when you understand why, it makes sense that climate change will increase the amount of snowfall in Alaska.

What is the difference between the meteorological and astronomical seasons? Read this essay to find out!

Here’s an interesting story on looking to the past for clues on how other civilizations that are long gone dealt with climate change and what they can teach us.

PUBLIC POLICY

In recent days, the USA’s CDC received a list of “forbidden” words. At first I thought this must be a sophomoric joke. Sadly enough, it isn’t.

And then there’s this…”More than 700 people have left the Environmental Protection Agency since President Trump took office, a wave of departures that puts the administration nearly a quarter of the way toward its goal of shrinking the agency to levels last seen during the Reagan administration.” To make matters worse, over 200 of them are scientists…and they’re not being replaced.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays” to all my followers and hope, regardless of whether you’re celebrating the holiday season or not, the coming days and new year brings you happiness, good health, and prosperity.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For December 9 – 16, 2017

Greetings all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are and, if you’re celebrating, your holiday season is going well. There’s plenty of topics to cover from this week…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

There’s something for everyone in Scientific American’s Top 10 Science Stories of 2017.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

The most important takeaway from this thought provoking read is the fact that, in times when notoriety and sensationalism are running amok, social media is a digital minefield.

Here’s another interesting TED talk on our online existence. “How Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google manipulate our emotions.”

Net neutrality is in the news again…and Dr. Marshall Shepherd has written an excellent essay on how ending net neutrality could harm science.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

While the focus of this “spot on” article is on dinosaurs, it could very easily apply to any science field. “A Psychological Explanation Of Kids’ Love Of Dinosaurs.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

For and avid recycler like yours truly, this is concerning news. “Recycling Chaos In USA As China Bans “Foreign Waste.”

The plastic industry has known for decades that it was polluting the world’s oceans…and continued to fight regulations and deny responsibility.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There’s more to dressing for winter cold that wearing a single heavy coat. What should be worn depends on wind chill, dew points, and much more. Here’s an excellent National Weather Service Winter Weather Safety website with all the safety info you need to know.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

It’s also important to understand how and why different types of winter precipitation form. Here’s an excellent website from the National Severe Storms Laboratory that explains it in an easy-to-understand way for the general public.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

While on the topic of winter weather safety, here’s a very good read on one of winter’s most underrated hazards…driving on black ice.

I can’t add anymore to this info-graphic other than the fact that it does apply to severe weather (thunderstorms, tornadoes, et al.) as well as winter weather.

Graphic courtesy National Weather Service Fort Worth, Texas

This is an important read. Research from the American Meteorological Society and NOAA shows a clear connection between recent extreme weather events and climate change.

A recent study shows the warming of the Arctic region is, “unprecedented in the last 1,500 years.”

Personally speaking, I’m somewhat optimistic. In spite of that, we’ve a long road ahead of us in the daunting challenge of dealing with climate change. “‘Losing the battle’: Emmanuel Macron delivers bleak assessment of fight against climate change.”

The causes of the ongoing California wildfires is a double-edged sword…and human driven climate change has to take its share of the blame.

 

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For November 27 – December 9, 2017

Greetings everyone and Happy Holidays! There’s plenty of great topics to review, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re looking to get into citizen science and weather, CoCoRaHS is the perfect place to start. All you need is the approved rain gauge, online access from either a desktop computer of mobile device…and you’re set to send in valuable data that is very important for climate records.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very interesting TED video on why wildfires in the USA have gotten worse and what can be done about it.

Climate change and other variables are easily responsible for the explosive nature of the California wildfires.

NASA has taken photos of the California wildfires that are nothing short of jaw-dropping.

While on the topic of wildfires, there is an unexpected connection between wildfires and winegrowers.

Wildfires not only threaten homes and businesses, but in the case of southern California, priceless works of art are vulnerable as well.

Single-use plastics have become so problematic worldwide that the only way to deal with their proliferation and threat to our environment may be to ban them altogether.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If recent winters across the USA have seemed warmer than usual, you’re not imagining things. The winters are warmer.

As our winters warm, rain is far more likely to become more common in areas that normally see snow. On the flip side, some areas will see more snow.

Can climate change cost us all more money? Absolutely. “As a result, the entire US population is already paying for climate change, whether we accept the science behind it or not. And things will almost certainly get worse.”

How does the USA military, which takes climate change VERY seriously, deal with challenges of the future? Watch this informative TED video and find out.

The Atlantic hurricane season has “officially” come to an end. Here’s a concise review from NOAA.

The topic of atmospheric dust isn’t something often heard, but it’s an important facet of how our weather and climate works.

PUBLIC POLICY

Here’s an example of good leadership that starts at the local level. “In the face of the Trump administration’s continued pullback on environmental and climate action, dozens of U.S. mayors gathering in Chicago pledged to meet or exceed the emission reduction targets set forth in the 2015 Paris Agreement, signing on to the “Chicago Climate Charter.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome and good yuletide wishes to my followers…I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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