Monthly Archives: January, 2018

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For January 20 – 29, 2018

Greetings to everyone! While winter has many weeks to go in the Northern Hemisphere, our friends south of the equator in Australia have been baking in one of the worst heat waves in quite some time. This post will begin being published on Monday as of today…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

PUBLIC POLICY

The USA is quickly loosing its grip as a worldwide leader in science and technology. “China’s Breathtaking Transformation Into A Scientific Superpower.”

Any government shutdown affects National Weather Service employees. “How A Government Shutdown Affects Your Weather Forecasts Today And In The Future.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Whether you’re into weather, citizen science, or both, the mPING project is a fantastic way for you to send in real-time reports to help in very important weather research.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very handy guide to all of the full moons you hear about.

There’s quite a spectacle on tap for 31 January 2018 when our moon is going to put on quite a show. Here’s to hoping you have a good view!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Tsunamis are one of the most devastating effects of earthquakes. A new real-time tsunami warning system could save many, many lives in the future.

The National Weather Service has an excellent Tsunami Safety Home Page that has potentially life-saving information if you live in a tsunami prone region.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s nothing like cutting off your nose to spite your face. It’s no secret that our current presidential administration’s tariffs on solar panels will cost the USA’s solar industry thousands of jobs.

At least there’s some good news on the renewables front. Last year, the state of Texas got 18% of its energy from solar and wind power.

And here’s some more good news. “Natural Gas Killed Coal – Now Renewables And Batteries Are Taking Over.”

Here’s a step in the right direction for England addressing the problem of plastic waste. “Network Of Water Refill Points Aims To Tackle Problem.”

Plastic pollution, which is something that can be found all over our planet…even in the middle of oceans…is finally getting some badly needed attention.

This is a bit of a long-read on air quality but a very important one. Air quality is currently the leading threat to public health on a global scale. “The 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental health and ecosystem vitality.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Portal and Drought Monitor shows dry/drought conditions spreading rapidly across much of the USA’s southern plains. As of 17 – 23 January 2018, 76.8 million people in the U.S. and 76.8 in the lower 48 states were experiencing varying degrees of dry conditions.

A very informative and interactive look at USA temperature trends since 1970 from Climate Central.

In this article from Scientific American, climate experts chime on the myth that climate change and rising levels of CO2 would benefit plants.

An excellent read with Katharine Hayhoe. “The True Threat Is The Delusion That Our Opinion Of Science Somehow Alters Its Reality.”

Speaking of altered reality, there are publishers of dubious integrity who are more than glad to publish papers from climate change deniers that are supposedly based on “science.”

There is a new wave of mini low-cost satellites that could vastly improve climate research in general and specifically predictions of weather and climate change.

WINTER SAFETY

Reminder on safety when shoveling snow…there’s a right way to do it with the right tools.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my followers for being a part of this and welcome the new folks. I’m glad you’re along. Remember that the publishing day for this post has now shifted to every Monday afternoon with re-posts on Monday evening and Tuesday morning. It will also be posted on Tornado Quest’s Twitter feed, Facebook page, and Tumblr blog.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Advertisements

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For January 13 – 20, 2018

Greetings to everyone! If you’re struggling to get through the current cold snap that is affecting much of North America, hang in there. Many locations have passed their climate “peak” of winter cold and are on the path to a slow but steady warmup. In contrast, folks in Australia are dealing with a brutal heat wave. There are plenty of other topics to review, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re looking for good search engine alternatives to the most popular ones, here’s a good read with several excellent privacy-oriented suggestions.

Is social media making us dumber? Here’s an interesting viewpoint on the hap-hazards of what could be the most contentious aspect of the online world. One caveat, it should be read with critical thinking skills in top gear.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into citizen science and weather, here’s a great project you can participate in…the mPING project that helps weather research. “Weather radars cannot “see” at the ground, so mPING reports are used by the NOAA National Weather Service to fine-tune their forecasts. NSSL uses the data in a variety of ways, including to develop new radar and forecasting technologies and techniques.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Check out this spectacular view of an active volcano from the viewpoint of a drone.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This is an important topic that has ramifications for many continents. Air quality is a crucial public health issue worldwide. “A Europe That Protects Cannot Sit By As 400,000 Europeans Die From Poor Air Quality Every Year.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The seasonal NOAA drought outlook valid until 30 April 2018 for the USA shows increasing dry/drought conditions from Arizona & Utah eastward to the southern plains. More sporadic dry/drought conditions on the outlook for the southern states and eastern seaboard.

Graphic: NOAA

International Falls, MN, USA has been known for years as the “icebox of the nation.” Recently, two other towns are vying for that title as the coldest joint in the contiguous USA.

Handling snow, even where it’s an annual event, is challenging. “Why Cities Where It Definitely Snows Continue To Act Like They’ve Never Seen Snow.”

This is a fantastic idea on teaching children about weather…and fortunately the focus is on getting them to go outside! “There’s No Such Thing As Bad Weather” is a Scandinavian mom’s guide to raising kids.

Speaking of weather education, it’s not to early to take a “refresher” course on severe weather. The National Severe Storms Laboratory has a nice Severe Weather 101 page to get you started for the coming severe weather season across North America.

WEATHER SAFETY

Shoveling snow can be an arduous task, especially if you’re not used to doing it every year. Here’s an excellent read on how to shovel snow properly and the best tools for the job.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Links to our other social media sites can be found below. See you there!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For January 6 – 13, 2018

Greetings to one and all! I hope that everyone in North America is handling the current cold snap well and you’re staying warm. There are at least two different viewpoints regarding this cold weather that will make for good reading. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Recent evaluation of these amazing images of Mars shows the existence of huge water reserves.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This was a long time coming. The UK has finally banned microbeads in cosmetics and personal care products.

In this day and age of bad news and non-stop contentiousness, here’s some good news on the renewable energy front. “USA Utility-Scale Solar, Wind Capacity Could Double By 2020.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA climate report is out…2017 was the third warmest year on record. Even worse, it was the costliest year on record for weather and climate disasters.

Here’s an excellent read on how the recent (and ongoing as of this post date) cold snaps across North America are clearly linked to a warming Arctic region.

A strong polar vortex (left, from December 2013) is centered over the Arctic. A weakened polar vortex (right, from January 2014) allows cold air to dip farther south. Credit: NOAA

In another story, here’s another take on the January 2017 cold snap. Ultimately, it’s up to the reader to weigh the information and, with critical thinking skills, form their own opinion.

The latest Drought Monitor shows dry to drought conditions affecting up to 67 million Americans in the contiguous USA.

NOAA’s GOES-13 weather satellite had been effectively retired. It’s like losing an old friend, but the new generation of satellites coming in the near future will be worth it.

Puerto Rico officials are re-evaluating the death toll from Hurricane Maria. As is the case all too often, it’s unfortunate that many deaths will be unreported and no exact death toll will ever be known.

Adding salt to the wound. After devastating wildfires, parts of California have been dealt another blow with deadly mudslides that have killed over a dozen people.

Here’s an excellent overview from Capital Weather Gang on how the California Thomas fire set the stage for the deadly mudslides.

And that is a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to my followers…old and new…in social media. It’s great to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For December 30, 2017 – January 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! If you live in North America, I hope you’ve handled the recent cold snap well. Many states, including Florida, saw the first snowfall they’ve had in many years. “Bomb Cyclone” was the weather term that was making the rounds in social media. Meanwhile, Australians are sizzling in a brutal heat wave. Truth be known, North America has been the only area on the entire planet that has really been cold as of late. Plenty more to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Hopefully, your night skies will be clear on 31 January 2018 for Earth’s moon to do something it hasn’t done for 150 years.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that Christmas is over, how do you keep that tree from going to a landfill? There are plenty of green options that are beneficial to our environment.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

As winter continues, it’s a good idea to re-familiarize yourself with winter weather terminology and the basics of winter weather forecasting.

A very nice overview of the early January “Bomb Cyclone” that affected much of eastern North America.

Speaking of the “Bomb Cyclone,” what does the term mean and why all the attention given to this event?

It’s not cold everywhere. Australians are dealing with a brutal heat wave with temperatures over 115F.

The latest Drought Monitor is out for the start of the new year. As of 2 January 2018, over 147 million people across the USA are experiencing abnormal dryness or drought conditions.

This is an article that can’t be shared enough. It’s an excellent response written by Dr. Marshall Shepherd regarding people using the winter cold as an excuse to refute climate change.

Scientific facts are hard to accept for some people. “A British government-backed research project that coordinates data from tide gauges around the world has hit back at climate science deniers who wrongly accused their scientists of faking findings.”

Evidence is mounting as scientists continue research that can link climate change to specific extreme weather events.

Even without the short-term warming influence of an El Niño event, 2017 was the hottest year globally on record according to NASA data.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

%d bloggers like this: