Monthly Archives: March, 2018

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 20 – 26, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s spring here in the Northern Hemisphere and, in spite of the snow that still remains, many areas are greening and warming up nicely. Across the southern states and great plains of North America, the severe weather season has been off to a rather quiet start…but that could change. There’s always plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re incensed about the latest Facebook FUBAR, you’re not alone…and chances are your privacy was compromised in a major way. Stopping Facebook from tracking you isn’t easy, but with persistence it can be done.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

This amazing graphic could not have been made without the help of a nationwide network of citizen science. It’s a few words of encouragement for folks who are anxiously awaiting spring…but the amazing graphics are possible only through folks who collect data on blooming plants and trees in spring.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

More than a half-year after Hurricane Harvey devastated a large portion of Houston, (the USA’s fourth-largest city), the extent of the storm’s environmental impact is beginning to surface, while questions about the long-term consequences for human health remain unanswered.
An unsettling read about the massive plastic garbage patch in the Pacific ocean. Sadly, this patch is only one of several.
Regardless of where you live, this is good news…and hopefully new wind energy records will become commonplace.
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Though weather and climate are close in many ways, there are significant differences that are important to understand.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

The World Meteorological Organization has released a new State Of The Climate report. This is an important read (40 page PDF document) so settle in and get up to date on the latest in climate science.

Speaking of climate, it’s been a while since the IPCC issued its latest report. In the past five years, we’ve learned a lot about climate…here’s a great update.

There’s an irrevocable link between wildlife, nature, and climate. Nations fighting climate change must understand this in order to meet the requirements of the Paris Accord.

If you’ve got a lot of snow to move, might as well make a mountain out of it all. I wonder how long it’ll take for all of this to melt?

PUBLIC POLICY

Truth stranger than fiction. “Web of Power: Cambridge Analytica And The Climate Science Denial Network Lobbying For Brexit And Trump.”

Apparently someone who should know better is in desperate need of a refresher course on the scientific method. “Scott Pruitt Will Restrict The EPA’s Use Of Legitimate Science.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along!

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For March 12 – 20, 2018

Greetings to one and all! Due to yesterday’s severe weather episode across several southern states, I thought it would be best to delay today’s post by one day. Several southern states, Alabama in particular, took quite a beating from early severe weather season storms. It’s the time of year and it would behoove all of us who live in tornado prone regions to have our severe weather preparations and plans in place or close to completion. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND SOCIETY

Here’s one of the most thought provoking essay/interviews I’ve read in some time. Cosmic Thinker Worries About Ends Of Science And Humanity.” Cosmologist Martin Rees holds forth on multiverses, biothreats, AI, utopia, God and “posthuman” science.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

The CoCoRaHS project is a great way for citizen scientists to get involved in collaborating in collecting valuable precipitation data.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Many broadcast meteorologists are getting some very creative and productive ideas to help them convey the importance of climate change to their viewers. “We are as close to a scientist as most Americans will ever get. People invite us into their living rooms. We have a responsibility to educate them on the facts.”

There are many misconceptions about meteorology that never seem to disappear. Dr. Marshall Shepherd addresses several in this excellent essay.

If the shoe fits, wear it…even if it takes a laugh to work! “Humor Can Get Young People Fired Up About Climate Change.”

It’s still a controversial idea, but the concept that warm spells in the Arctic has links to winter weather events in the eastern USA is gaining ground with new research. The study includes more than 60 years of data on U.S. weather and Arctic climate conditions, from 1950 to 2016.

Today, 20 March 2018, is the first day of “spring” in the Northern Hemisphere. What is the difference between meteorological and astronomical spring?

If you’re a cloud geek like me, you’ll get pretty excited about this! “The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has released its new, long-awaited, digitized International Cloud Atlas – the global reference for observing and identifying clouds, which are an essential part of weather, the climate system and the water cycle. It was released for the World Meteorological Day on 23rd March.”

The outlook for spring 2018 is out from NOAA for the USA. At the current time, it looks like much of the country could be above normal in temperatures. Keep in mind this is an outlook and not a forecast.

Map courtesy NOAA

The latest US Drought Portal shows 26.4% of the USA is experiencing dry/drought conditions as of March 7 – 13, 2018.  The latest US Drought Monitor shows extreme and exceptional drought conditions in the southern plains and four corners region. Parts of Oklahoma are particularly hard hit with Exceptional Drought conditions affecting some areas that have seen little to no rain in several months.

Map courtesy NOAA/US Drought Monitor

This past week marks the anniversary of the Tri-State Tornado…the deadliest tornado in USA history.

That’s a wrap for this post! Happy Spring for my followers in the Northern Hemisphere and for folks south of the equator, Happy Autumn!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! For many of you, winter is holding on with a firm grip. Much of the northeastern USA has taken a beating lately from repeated rounds of snow, wind, and generally very unpleasant weather. For those folks, spring can’t arrive soon enough. As for the rest of us, it’s a mixed bag. A few severe weather episodes have occurred in the southern part of North America…and there will be much more to come. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE & EDUCATION

Contrary to popular opinion, university scientists are indeed interested in teaching. From personal experience, all of my university professors were keenly devoted to conveying knowledge.

Print books are still hard to beat. In spite of the convenience of mobile devices, holding the printed page in your hands has a special feel to the words and images within the covers. As a voracious reader, print will always be my personal preference.

Interesting perspective that is somewhat unsettling. Many people don’t understand science (bad), yet want their children to take an interest in it (very good).

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Here’s a handy climate-friendly car guide that might help you choose a model that has a smaller carbon footprint than what most of us are driving.

Smart phones have been an amazing addition to technology. But sometimes, we all can go a bit overboard in how we use them. Here’s a thought provoking read on breaking your phone addiction.

As the saying goes, “A lie will circle the globe before the truth has a chance to cross the street.” Fake news, whether from nefarious interlopers or hyperbole/adrenaline junkies, is at an epidemic level…with no end in sight.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science read. “Citizen Science Birding Data Passes Scientific Muster.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s an unavoidable connection between trees and climate change. By some accounts, trees are in trouble. “New evidence shows that the climate is shifting so quickly, it’s putting many of the world’s trees in jeopardy.”

With the temptations of computer games and binge watching television, kids are often inside when they could be exploring some amazing facets of our natural world. Here are five reasons why kids need to spend more time with nature.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you aware of the different types of tornadoes? Not all tornadoes or vortexes are associated with supercell thunderstorms. he most important thing to remember is that each of these carries its own hazards…regardless of how benign it may appear.

Infographic courtesty NOAA/NWS

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA for February 2018. The main takeaway…above normal temperatures and dry to drought conditions for much of the USA. The report also covers the winter of 2017-2018. The maps below show the departure from normal for temperature and precipitation.

Maps courtesy NOAA

Thundersnow is a spectacular event to witness. Here in Oklahoma, robust snowstorms are often laced with lightning. Here’s an excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the science behind thundersnow.

Here’s a very nice video that’s concise and aimed at the layperson who may not understand the technicalities of climate change and it’s connection to extreme weather events. “Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Wetter. Here’s How We Know.”

One sobering reminder of the impact of climate change is the number of billion dollar disasters that are increasing with stunning frequency.

Conveying climate change information to the general public can be an occupational hazard for broadcast meteorologists, In spite of the challenges, many are successfully passing on important information that, for their own good, the public needs to know.

If each spring in the Northern Hemisphere looks a bit warmer with each passing year, it’s not your imagination.

Up to 41 million Americans may live in flood zones…and millions of them may not even know about it.

Here’s an excellent read on the priceless value that weather satellites provide to meteorologists and the challenges that come with the technology.

PUBLIC POLICY

This is one of those scenarios that reveals the true inefficiency of bureaucracy that so infuriates an INTJ personality like me. “The U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board has not met in at least six months, and some of its members say it’s being sidelined to avoid getting in the way of agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s anti-regulatory agenda.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…I’m glad you’re along for the fun. For my followers who have been with me through thick and thin, I appreciate every one of you. Your loyalty is not taken for granted.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For February 26 – March 5, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s severe weather safety awareness week in many locations…and we’re no exception. With this week’s post, we’ll take a look at some essential safety links that pertain to thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, flooding, and NOAA weather radios. It’s also been a wild weather week across much of North America and parts of Europe. A powerful Nor’Easter pounded the northeastern states and much of northern Europe was impacted by a substantial winter storm.  Many other subjects to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in astronomy…or how our universe came to be. “A Potentially Game-Changing Message From The Dawn Of Time.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It would be nice to see this put into action within Oklahoma. “The risk of human-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth’s crust, according to new research.”

Here’s some very good renewable energy news. More than 100 cities around the world are getting most of their electricity from renewable energy sources. Furthermore, the number of cities that get at least 70% of their electricity from renewables has more than doubled in the last three years.

Oklahoma is the number 2 state in the USA in wind energy…but that’s not stopping some who are threatened by those facts from instigating some actions that are dubious in integrity.

Some of the most spectacular and priceless natural gems in the USA are potentially under the gun if the current presidential administration removes their protection.

Speaking of protection, a re-organization at the USA’s EPA could remove a federal environmental office that works to test the effects of chemical exposure on adults and children and merge it with other EPA offices.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Recent warming in the Arctic is alarming to that point that many climate scientists are taken aback at the level at which it’s occurring. The Arctic warming which is technically known as a warm air intrusion, may be somewhat common in the Arctic climate. However, climate scientists say this event was not like previously ‘normal’ climate events.

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, and Lightning: Nature’s Most Violent Storms.

The Storm Prediction Center’s Online Tornado FAQ.

Tornado Safety by Roger Edwards of the Storm Prediction Center.

Safety info about derechoes…powerful and dangerous thunderstorms with hurricane force winds.

From the American Red Cross: Severe Weather Safety Tips…plus a myriad of other important information.

Turn Around, Don’t Drown…flooding is one of the most lethal aspects of severe thunderstorms and kills more people annually than tornadoes and lightning combined.

NOAA Weather Radio: for many people, this is their first line of defense during a severe weather event. NOAA weather radios should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Having multiple ways of receive warnings is an essential part of being prepared for severe weather and your mobile device is no exception.

Building a severe weather safety kit is easy. It’s just a matter of following some steps and getting your kit together promptly and having it in location where it can be easily reached.

PUBLIC POLICY

A top EPA regulator has the potential to obliterate environmental protections one small step at a time. Interlopers like this can operate at a level that, if not closely monitored, does a significant amount of damage whose ramifications are not noticed until it’s too late.

That’s a wrap for this week! One last reminder…as with ALL severe weather events, please be sure to follow reliable and official sources of watch and warning information. Your life may depend on it. I’d also like to thank my followers…I’m glad you’re along.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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