Category Archives: Tornado Quest Science Links

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 13 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you are. Across North America, it’s been rather quiet as of late…but with winter just around the corner, that won’t last long. One of the biggest stories of the past week has been the Paris Climate Agreement conference held in Bonn, Germany. There’s a link in this week’s post that’ll give you a quick overview. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Network Theory…a part of “big data” that anyone with an interest in the sciences should be familiar with.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

It’s not too early to mark your calendars for Citizen Science Day which will take place on 14 April 2018!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’ve seen ourselves in the heavens.” A large spiral galaxy 180 million light years from Earth resembles the Milky Way and has a pair of interacting galaxies that look like our galaxy’s two brightest satellites.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

While this essay on recycling is very thought provoking, it doesn’t really offer any sound solutions or remedies to our current recycling challenges…which is what we need now more than ever.

Speaking of recycling, electronic waste (aka e-waste) is on the rise globally…and there’s no end in sight as manufacturers keep making products that are meant to be disposable instead of repairable.

At the ongoing Paris Climate Summit, the USA’s agenda has been focused on advocating fossil fuels. Needless to say, this has not gone over well.

The “Quakegate” in Oklahoma just got more interesting. Can’t help but wonder who the “Deep Throat” is in this exceptionally disturbing scenario. There’s certainly a Liddy on the loose.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s some exciting news for weather data. NASA has just launched a new weather satellite that, along with existing satellites, give atmospheric scientists amazing forecasting data.

Here’s a concise overview of the latest Paris Climate Agreement conference (COP23) held in Bonn, Germany.

Here’s a striking visualization from NASA of 20 years of global data on climate change.

This is a fascinating study from National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Due to climate change, North American storm clusters could produce up to 80% more rainfall and pose a significantly larger flooding threat.

NASA had recently developed a tool that indicated how much sea level rise coastal cities can expect based on degree of ice melt and the city’s location.

Finally, from the Popular Science archives: Where In The United States Is Nature Most Likely To Kill You. It’s a complicated answer but in terms of severe weather, ‘hurricanes are the most expensive disaster, while severe weather (including tornadoes) has claimed the highest number of fatalities.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Feel free to check out social media links below and, if you’re so inclined, follow along and join the fray.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 6 – 13, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I’m glad you stopped by and hope the weather is to your liking whether it’s autumn or spring in your location. As of this post, much of North America is relatively quiet with autumn settling in nicely across most of the continent. Fortunately, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is winding down quickly…and after such a destructive year, that’s very good. Let’s get started on this week’s selection.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

No, this isn’t “new” news. Yes, we’ve been dealing with it since 2016. But is it any wonder that Instagram and Twitter, having become a morass of shills, hucksters, and “beautiful people” have become very clique-oriented and useless to the average user? This paragraph says it all…

“Remixing the feed will make Instagram less useful as a real-time content feed because the most recent posts won’t necessarily be at the top. Users will have to worry about making their posts good enough to be chosen by the algorithm or their posts could be de-prioritized. And brands might lose the reach of a previously reliable marketing channel, the same way they did with Facebook Pages.” – TechCrunch

All hail the mighty algorithm. If, like me, you wish you understand and then disable the algorithm, you may have to research each individual social media entity (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et al.) since there’s no “one size fits all” solution to this challenge.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Your smart phone is the only tool you’ll need to help this awesome citizen science project that tracks mosquitoes.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Studying an active volcano is obviously dangerous. Fortunately, this is where a drone can “step” in and help.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The pollution released by recent wildfires across the USA is making Americans sick and undermining decades of progress in cleaning the air.

Trees are good for the environment in so many different ways…and helping to clean the air we breathe is only one.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a look at October 2017 in the USA. “October’s nationally averaged temperature was 55.7 degrees F, 1.6 degrees above average, which placed it among the warmest third of the historical record.”

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Unfortunately, recent data shows that carbon emissions worldwide are still on the rise.

In spite of the frequent dour news we hear regarding climate change, there are some bright lights that are worth looking at.

Long-term forecasts such as this are a bit risky, but interesting nonetheless. “Sweden’s Big Cities Predicted To Have Coldest Winter In Five Years.”

PUBLIC POLICY

In spite of “official” stances…”US states, cities and businesses signed up to ‘America’s pledge’ to combat global warming have a combined economic power equal to the world’s third-biggest economy.”

No further comment needed on this. “The Senate Just Approved Trump’s Pic For NASA Chief. You Can Probably Guess What He Thinks About Climate Change.”

The “pushback” from climate change denialists is getting more desperate by the day.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. You’ll find links to all our social media below…our Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram are the most active accounts. We’d be glad to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 30 – November 6, 2017

Greetings everyone! There’s plenty of topics to review this week with the biggest story being the latest National Climate Assessment…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Communicating science can be challenging enough but bring trolls into the mix, and you’ve got quite a toxic brew. Fortunately, these nefarious interlopers can be taken down more than a few notches.

Here’s an excellent segment from the 3 November 2017 edition of Science Friday that is a “must-listen” – “Defending Science In A ‘Post-Truth’ Era.”

Convincing the general public that the environment is an important factor in our health, quality of life, economics, et al, is not easy…but some studies are showing hope.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Time for many folks to switch to Standard Time…and while you’re at it, switch to LED light bulbs. I’ve been using them for some time and can’t recommend them highly enough.

Here’s a “head scratcher” read that makes you wonder. “Blocking The Sun”: New Report Documents Efforts To Undermine Rooftop Solar.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) was released on 3 November 2017. “This report is an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States. It represents the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990.”

This is a nice concise summary of the climate assessment that gives you the most important points.

Nations are urged to step up ambitions to cut emissions as floods, hurricanes, et al. are being linked to climate change.

Here’s a summary from the National Hurricane Center of the very busy 2017 Atlantic hurricane season to date.

The latest NOAA outlook for November shows warmer than usual temperatures for much of the southern contiguous USA and northern Alaska.

Here’s a look at November’s precipitation outlook. Please keep in mind that these are outlooks and not forecasts. Local deviations can and will occur. 

As for drought conditions, much of the USA is in decent shape save for portions of South Dakota and Montana.

COP23 will be taking place in Bonn, Germany on November 6, 2017 for the next round of United Nations climate talks. Here are four signs to watch for that are critical issues.

An Antarctic research station is preparing to close as cracks in the nearby ice shelf are growing. I wouldn’t stay around either.

While ice shelves are developing cracks, global warming is also a significant threat to major cities the world over. Why? Simple. These cities will literally drown.

Could we have a new world record for the lowest recorded barometric (atmospheric) pressure?

Nothing good can come of this. “Understaffed National Weather Service Scales Back Balloon Launches That Collect Vital Forecast Data.”

PUBLIC POLICY

The train wreck continues. “Pruitt Takes Steps To Remove Science From Decisions Affecting The Health Of American Families.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s good to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 23 – 30, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope your autumn is to your liking and for folks in the southern hemisphere, here’s to a bountiful spring season. There are plenty of topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Disasters of all kinds force us to reevaluate the importance we place on belongings.

Here’s a fascinating read on climate change and the human mind. If we’re not willing to introspectively examine our feelings on such an important topic, where does that leave us?

News coverage of recent droughts that carried a stern message may be the way to go…it just might help with the water waste issue.

WEATHER SAFETY/EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Forest fires in Brazil and Indonesia contributed to a record loss in global tree cover in 2016, equivalent to the size of New Zealand, that could accelerate deforestation blamed for climate change.

Here’s the recent Lancet report on pollution, premature deaths, and public health.

A very nice summary of the Lancet report can be found here.

St. Louis, Missouri has just taken the bold step of becoming the largest midwestern USA city to commit to clean energy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

I’ve always been of the opinion that NOAA’s National Weather Service is woefully understaffed, poorly funded, in need of twice as many Doppler radars, three times as many NOAA weather radio transmitter sites, and far better equipment and working conditions. This good read is my chance to say, “I told you so.”

Is there a distinct connection between the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season and climate change? Mounting evidence says there is.

When taking several other variables (and personal opinions) into account, the connection between the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season and climate change becomes far more complex.

Due to a combination of human activities and a strong El Niño, another CO2 record has been set…and what’s especially bad is that this happened at a record speed.

PUBLIC POLICY

The water crisis in Puerto Rico that is taking place in the wake of Hurricane Maria could have been avoided.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media…it’s great to have you along.

Cheers!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 11 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re having good weather wherever you are. Here across much of North America, we’re getting a touch of autumn…some areas are enjoying the spectacular fall foliage, others are still reeling from devastating hurricanes and wildfires. There’s plenty to look over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

The US state of New Mexico has reversed course (somewhat) on a recent public education issue with startling changes to proposed science standards. In the 21st century, it’s hard to believe that any of these changes were even proposed.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

One underrated hazard from natural disasters is the prevalence of PTSD which, all too often, can be permanently disabling.

A little social science combined with technology. “Our Toxic Smartphone Addiction.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An excellent video summary from the BBC on why the California wildfires are so deadly.

There’s a definite connection between climate change and the California wildfires. Here’s what is know so far.

As of 20 October 2017, California wildfires have caused over one billion US dollars in damages.

This is an excellent perspective on the California wildfires. “Promoting the right kind of fire—and smarter development—is safer and more cost-effective than fighting a losing battle.”

While part of the recent California wildfires can be attributed to climate change and natural causes, humans must be willing to accept responsibility for our part.

Using plastics is almost unavoidable…and can be precarious. Here’s an excellent guide on what kinds of plastics to chose and which ones to avoid altogether.

Why are scientists so bad at recycling? Unfortunately, many laboratory scenarios have certain challenges…but zero waste can be achieved.

In Europe, the 2014 death toll from air pollution is estimated to have been as high as 500,000 early deaths.

The potential for wind energy worldwide is immense…and now’s the time to start harnessing this renewable source of clean energy.

A small town in the very Red state of Texas is the perfect example of what an American eco-friendly city of the future looks like.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has been remarkable. 2017 became the first year in more than a century and only the fourth on record with 10 consecutive Atlantic storms reached hurricane strength.

Read how and why Ophelia was the strongest storm to hit Ireland in almost half a century.

An interesting read from Climate Central on the effect climate change is having on fall foliage.

The watch and waiting game for La Niña continues. “The October ENSO forecast says La Niña conditions are favored during the fall and winter 2017-18, but at press time the ocean-atmosphere system didn’t quite meet the criteria for a La Niña Advisory.”

Here’s a look at this week’s USA Drought Monitor. Here’s a detailed region-by-region look at current drought conditions.

The road to recovery for Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria is going to be a long one that will take years.

PUBLIC POLICY

No words to describe this continuation of the train wreck. “In announcing his abandonment of the Clean Power Plan, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt boasted, “The war on coal is over.” That means the war on children has begun.”

Here’s another “head scratcher” that isn’t really surprising. The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency has scrubbed their website of references to ‘climate change.’

This is an interestingly disconcerting development. “Trump Pics Weather Company Chief to Lead NOAA.”


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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For October 4 – 11, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. This has been another wild week across North America. As Hurricane Nate made landfall on the Gulf Coast, devastating wildfires in the western USA destroyed thousands of structures. Just for good measure, we’ve had a few episodes of severe weather in the Great Plains as well. There are plenty of other topics, including Earth Science Week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE EDUCATION/CITIZEN SCIENCE

Earth Science Week is in progress! This year’s Earth Science Week is from October 8-14, 2017 and has the theme “Earth and Human Activity.”

The free mPING app is a great way for you to send a wide variety of weather information to the National Severe Storms Laboratory. Your report helps with weather research!

SOCIAL SCIENCE

After a natural disaster, dealing with the physical and psychological fatigue and PTSD can be overwhelming. Rest assured, if you’ve ever endured that, you’re not alone.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Here’s a good read on the daunting challenges that exist with recycling and dealing with litter.

Kicking our addiction to plastic is a crucial environmental issue. Up to one-third of all plastic packaging produced winds up in the oceans of our planet.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report for January to September 2017 from NOAA. Among the findings…every state across the contiguous USA had above average temperatures for the first nine months of 2017.

Graphics courtesy NOAA

Recent temperatures have been sweltering in Australia. And yes, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) links it to climate change. Here is the full 29 page (PDF file) report from the Australia BoM.

Graphic courtesy Australia BoM

September 2017 was a very active time for the Atlantic hurricane season. “The Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for September 2017 set a new record for any month over the North Atlantic basin.”

With climate change comes many facets of our atmosphere that will be quite different from the past. One of those will be air travel.

Many people in countries other than the USA take climate change very seriously. Why do Americans have such a cavalier attitude towards such a critical crisis?

Not all Americans take a careless attitude towards climate change. The US Defense Department takes it very, very seriously.

Interesting read on climate change and it’s connection to the recent and ongoing North American wildfires. “Droughts And Wildfires: How Global Warming Is Drying Up The North American Monsoon.”

The time for discussions regarding hurricanes and their effects on populated areas is now. “In A Time Of Hurricanes, We Must Talk About Environmental Conservation.”

Speaking of hurricanes, one of the USA’s most vulnerable cities, New Orleans, has a disastrous history of dealing with the inevitable flooding that so often comes with tropical cyclones.

The builders of this house say it can withstand a powerful tornado or hurricane. The real proof would be if one were actually exposed to EF-5 winds and the heavy debris field that would accompany such a tornado as it moved through a densely populated area.

While not all are weather-related, many of these amazing images are related to the changes of the seasons and the arrival of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere.

PUBLIC POLICY

A major setback for the USA’s environmental policy. “EPA Announces Repeal Of Major Obama-Era Carbon Emissions Rule.”

THE AFTERMATH

Consider this is only one batch. Ripe with floodwaters (and accompanying bacteria, mold, etc.) from Hurricane Harvey…a bevy of vehicles stored in Texas. There are at least two more with just as many vehicles that were flooded.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun. We live in very interesting times and I’m glad we’re going through this together.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 19 – 26, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We’ve just had the autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and for some folks, a chill is in the air and foliage is changing to the traditional autumn colors. South of the equator, spring is in the air as their season begins to warm. The big weather story as of late has been the hurricane activity in the Atlantic…we’ll touch on that and a few other topics…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

A surprising read for my fellow dinosaur enthusiasts. “Plant-eating dinosaurs usually found plenty to eat, but occasionally they went looking for a nutritional boost.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Unlike hurricanes, winter storms, or severe convective weather events, there is no reliable or easy way to predict a significant earthquake.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Hurricanes often bring about or exacerbate bad environmental issues. Hurricane Maria and its effects on Puerto Rico are a good example.

In spite of many naysayers, clean energy is one way to circumnavigate aging and poorly maintained energy infrastructures in the wake of many natural disasters.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The weather forecasting done today is more accurate than ever but by some accounts, the public takes issue with that.

If you live in the USA and love summer, you’re probably enjoying the longer hot spells. Be warned, the details will prove that longer summers aren’t good.

Has the Atlantic hurricane season been active? Yes. Is it the worst hurricane season ever? Hardly. Not even close.

The recovery from Hurricane Maria will take months in Puerto Rico…which has not experienced a major hurricane for almost ninety years.

The current, and long-lasting, effects from Hurricane Maria can best be described as a humanitarian emergency for Puerto Rico.

Very well said in regards to Hurricane Maria. “To deny climate change is to procrastinate while the earth sinks; it is to deny a truth we have just lived.”

Here’s an exceptionally shocking collection of photos from Puerto Rico that will give you an idea of just how bad the current crisis is.

From Carbon Brief…Factcheck: Climate Models Have Not “Exaggerated” Global Warming.

Truth stranger than fiction. The USA’s EPA has tapped the Heartland Institute for “non-alarmist” climate “experts” for various purposes…similar to having the fox guard the henhouse.

PUBLIC POLICY

The train wreck continues. The unfortunate part is many folks on all points of the political spectrum have sincere and honest environmental concerns. “GOP Runs Roughshod Over Democratic, Environmental Safeguards.”

The current EPA’s Clean Power Plan is due for drastic changes…and nothing good can come of this.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

————————————————————————————-

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 12 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone. Running a day late due to recovery from a medical procedure and keeping tabs on two very potent hurricanes…hence the short post for this week. Obviously, the big stories this week are the tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and the central Mexican earthquake which (as of this post) has killed over 200 people. Tropical cyclones Jose and Maria have been front and center in terms of weather. We’re still in the “peak” of the Atlantic hurricane season, so there are potentially several active weeks ahead. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This is an interesting, and disconcerting, read on where a surveyed segment of society gets their news online. Unfortunately, Twitter, which is more up-to-the-minute and accurate, isn’t at the top.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Cassini spacecraft will soon have its swan song with a spectacular plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Many areas in and around Houston, TX that were flooded by Hurricane Harvey have an extra hazard to the aftermath…toxic chemicals in the flood waters.

Hurricane Irma left behind an environmental and public health hazard that has a level of disgust all its own.

The recent wildfires in the western USA presented another hazard to those in their paths or downwind from the fires…smoke that can cause serious health problems.

Plastic fibers have been found in water samples from around the world. If that sounds bad, just wait until you find out what it can do to your body when you drink it.

Our changing climate is inevitably going to change our diets.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest information on Hurricane Maria and Tropical Storm Jose can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s website.

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report. “The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for August 2017 was the third highest for the month of August in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back to 1880.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA

This week’s Drought Monitor shows a sustained drought maintaining its hold from the north central plains to the Pacific northwest.

Graphic courtesy US Drought Monitor

The long-term view of climate change is of the utmost importance. Future generations depend on it.

NOAA’s latest La Niña outlook is out.  “There is an increasing chance (~55-60%) of   during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2017-18.” By some accounts, the southern half of the contiguous USA will be warmer than usual. It’s also important to keep in mind that this is only an outlook and NOT a forecast.

Here’s a spot-on read by Eric Holthaus. “Harvey, Irma, Maria: This Is The Hurricane Season Scientists Expected…And Feared. ”

Why don’t more broadcast meteorologists convey information and/or educational information to their viewers regarding climate change? “Part of the problem is that while TV meteorologists may not be climate-change deniers, too many are climate-change ignorers.” It may not be the broadcast meteorologists that have a say in this…but the corporate media powers-that-be.

The social and psychological effects of tropical cyclones (and other significant weather events) always give a sobering reminder of the power of nature.

An excellent post by meteorologist Dan Satterfield. “You And Your Congressman REALLY Need To Read This.”

Severe weather phobias are very real and, for countless people, a major source of stress and anxiety that takes a significant toll on their quality of life.

THE QUIXOTIC

Maybe it was a slow news day. “Newsweek Gives Cato Institute Climate Denier A Platform.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 5 – 12, 2017

Greetings everyone! It’s been a wild weather week across the USA. This week’s post will be very, very short, but I hope to have everything back up to speed very soon after my surgery.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The environmental impacts from a hurricane such as Harvey are substantial. We’re just beginning to understand the short and long-term ramifications.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Being a part of the hurricane hunters may sound glamorous, but it’s a hazardous and strenuous task.

Hurricane Irma was bad enough, but it easily could have been much worse.

An important read that is an unavoidable topic…and if there was ever a time when it needs to be discussed, that time is now. “What We Know About The Climate Change-Hurricane Connection.”

Last but not least, an excellent Hurricane Safety resource page.

See you good people next time!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For August 29 – September 5, 2017

Greetings everyone! I’m glad you stopped by. All eyes, at least for North America, are on Hurricane Irma. As of this post (5 September 2017), it is steadily intensifying and on a collision course with the northern Leeward Islands. There’s a lot of uncertainty as to its path five or six days from now, but this storm definitely bears watching. If you’re in need of hurricane preparedness information, I’ve got a fantastic link below that has just about all the information you need. Also, please stick with official information sources, especially in social media. That means following the National Hurricane Center and your local National Weather Service office. People have differing opinions and preferences on news media sources, so I’ll just take care of that by recommending you follows those of your personal preference. Many are quite good at what they do and are excellent at taking complex information and making it palatable to a public that is not familiar with the earth sciences. There are plenty of other topics to touch on, so let’s get a start.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent citizen science project anyone can participate in. Keep an eye out for Monarch butterflies!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Fascinating view of an ever-changing element of nature. “Laser-mapping technology makes visible the meanderings of Oregon’s Willamette River over the past 12,000 years.”

The environmental impacts of Hurricane Harvey won’t be fully known for some time. One thing’s for certain, it will be massive, long-lasting, and have substantial public health ramifications. For most flooding situations that involve large metropolitan areas and/or industrial markets, a “toxic soup” is left behind that won’t go away anytime soon.

Hurricane Harvey left behind a great deal of devastation in the Texas agriculture industry.

An excellent read from American Scientist. “Why Ecology Needs Natural History.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A spectacular image of Hurricane Irma in the late afternoon of 5 September 2017 when it was at Category 5 strength with 185 mph winds. 

If you’re looking for hurricane preparedness information, start here.

All over social media, there’s a cacophony of information, much of it misleading and full of hyperbole. Here’s a good guide to cutting through all the chaff and learning how to follow Hurricane Irma…or any other tropical cyclone.

The cost of Hurricane Harvey is unknown at this point (1 September 2017) but could well be one of the most costly natural disasters in USA history.

Before and after imagery of a natural disaster have a significant impact. These images of the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey are no exception.

Science Friday had an excellent segment on their 1 September 2017 broadcast covering Hurricane Harvey, the climate change connection, and the health hazards that will be more than plentiful in the storm’s aftermath.

A very thought provoking read on the truth about Hurricane Harvey and climate change is somewhere in the middle.

Another good read on Hurricane Harvey from meteorologist Dan Satterfield: “We Told You So!” Is Never Welcomed If You’re On The Receiving End.

Last but not least, an excellent read from the Union of Concerned Scientists. “Catastrophic Intensity: Why Is Hurricane Irma Gaining Strength So Quickly?”

While many areas dealt with the aftermath of Harvey, several western USA states broiled in unseasonably hot temperatures that also induced wildfires.

PUBLIC POLICY

The USA is second-to-none when it comes to forecasting weather. The challenges, especially when it comes to flooding, come after the storm and may never be resolved.

This is censorship at its best. “USA energy agency asked scientists to scrub references to climate change.”

Finally, some common sense that is badly needed in a global culture that is obsessed with acerbic politics. If you think the strife over climate change is bad, just take a look at how our everyday society has become polemically political.

And…that is a wrap for this post! Aside from this blog, Tornado Quest has plenty of other social media outlets with something for everyone.

Cheers…and ecce signum!

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