Tag Archives: air pollution

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For January 3 – 13, 2017

Greetings everyone! This has been a wild weather week across much of the western USA with California getting tons of snow, more than enough rainfall to put a dent in much of the drought stricken areas, and even an EF-0 tornado near Sacramento. Much of the midwest is bracing for an ice storm and, as of this date (13 January 2017) Ice Storm Warnings are in effect from the northeast Texas panhandle across Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and even into west-central Illinois. As usual, there’s a plethora of other topics to cover. On a personal level, it’s been a “full dance card” week for me with many projects that led me to delay this week’s post. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Excellent read from American Scientist magazine on nurturing scientific literacy among the general public. What is meant by ‘scientific literacy?’

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating story of a man who, in search of a quiet existence in a remote area, inadvertently had a significant effect on climate change science.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read about researchers getting the first look at a very rare kind of galaxy.

A recent study found evidence that the Earth’s moon is older than scientists thought…millions of years earlier than previously believed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An idea that, for the sake of our future generations, should come to fruition. “How To Save $23 Trillion Per Year: 100% Renewable Energy For The World.”

Good advice to get the new year started off right. “All too often environmentalism is about stopping doing something, but maybe it’s time to be more active and start doing something instead?”

As of late, the air pollution in China has literally become lethal in nature. This article explains why their air pollution is on the rise again.

China isn’t the only country struggling with severe air pollution problems. Just five days into 2017, London has breached its annual air pollution limit.

Those of us in Oklahoma know all too well what Trump’s EPA nominee Scott Pruitt is capable of. Now, the rest of the country has the chance to find out for themselves.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting read on a study that says the frequency of large-scale tornado outbreaks is increasing in the USA, particularly when it comes to the most extreme events. A link to the original study is included.

Tornadoes in California? You bet. On 10 January 2017, the Sacramento area was visited by an EF-0 tornado.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows over 20% of the contiguous USA is experiencing drought conditions. Recent rain and snowfall throughout the southern states should provide relief that will be evident on the next Drought Monitor.

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There’s often a great deal of confusion about winter weather advisories, watches, and warnings. This NWS infographic has got you covered.

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Are you prepared for an ice storm? If you’re in the areas under an Ice Storm Warning, all the preparations in this info-graphic (courtesy of the St. Louis, MO National Weather Service) should be rushed to completion.

are-you-prepared-for-an-ice-storm

While it may sound bizarre, you can have a blizzard even when it’s not snowing.

In 2016, a total of 121 flood related deaths occurred in the USA. This map from the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center gives a state-by-state breakdown. High death tolls in West Virginia were due to June floods, Texas deaths from flooding in late May.

2016-usa-flood-deaths-map

Just when you thought the new year couldn’t get off to a more bizarre start. “House Science Committee’s Twitter Account Is Now Just Another Climate Science Denial Troll.”

While not necessarily representative of the whole of American society, this survey gives an informative ‘snapshot’ of the daunting challenges atmospheric scientists are up against when trying to convey climate science to the general public.

Another challenge is conveying the risk of climate change to the public. A recent World Economic Forum report ranks climate change and associated environmental factors as the greatest risk facing humanity.

Here’s a disconcerting ‘must-read’ on the anti-science crusade that continues to build steam in the USA. “The Congressional Attack On Science.”

A concise overview from the Capital Weather Gang of ten extreme weather events outside of the USA that killed thousands and cost untold billions during 2016.

In the Antarctic, an ice shelf is breaking up from the inside out. The ice shelf is bigger than New York’s Long Island and when it breaks off, it could result in global sea level rise that threatens many large cities close to the world’s coasts.

THOUGHT PROVOKING

Last but not least, when asked about death and the ‘afterlife,’ astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson gives a spot on answer that is particularly enlightening.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For December 12 – 20, 2016

Greetings everyone! For those of you across North America, I hope you’re managing to stay warm during the current cold snap. It certainly adds a bit of ‘zing’ to the holiday season. Speaking of the holidays, this post and the following two will be on the brief side. It’s a crazy, busy time of year for many of us and I’m no exception. Still, there are important topics to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A wide variety of science fields are covered in this particular retrospective on the twelve key science moments of 2016.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

What’s the best way to communicate scientific concepts that are often very complex to the general public? “It turns out that even in the world of scientific writing, your eighth-grade teacher was right: how you write can matter as much as what you write.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news for astronomy fans. The world’s largest digital survey of the visible Universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

When the air quality in a city is so bad that airline traffic is cancelled, you know it’s air that is literally lethal to breathe.

Here’s an excellent read and infographic on reducing your plastic pollution. The plastics that are part of many life saving items aren’t the problem, it’s the “daily plastics” that aren’t always necessary and so easily discarded that are the challenge.

The Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association has released a “fact” sheet on waste water injection/fracking and it’s relation to the recent and dramatic increase of earthquakes in the Sooner State. For reasons that are blatantly obvious, they’re not taking responsibility for their actions. This is public relations cherry-picking at its best.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An unsettling read from Climate Central: Scientists Are Saving Climate Data; This Is Why It Matters. “In recent days, efforts have sprung up to archive climate data on federal sites. They’ve been spurred by fears that the Trump administration could take a hostile stance toward climate science and that budget cuts could make data less accessible.”

A very unsettling essay by climate scientist Michael E. Mann that is a “must read” for anyone interested in the atmospheric sciences. “I’m A Scientist Who Has Gotten Death Threats. I Fear What May Happen Under Trump.”

Here’s a look at NOAA’s global State Of The Climate report for November, 2016. First, let’s take a look at selected climate anomalies and events.

201611Here’s the global temperature trends for November. While much of North America was quite above normal, parts of Europe and Asia were unseasonably cool.

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After a very warm November in North America, 2016 had to get one last cold shot in before year’s end. Watching it take place across surface observations (especially the Oklahoma Mesonet) was quite a sight.

Finally, a rather impertinent view of the never-to-be-settled-argument on school closings and winter weather. In this game, you just can’t win, even when erring on the side of justifiable caution.


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 17 – 29, 2016

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. For those in the USA who celebrated the holiday, I hope you had a very Happy Thanksgiving. I took advantage of the rare opportunity for some R&R time for myself, so this week’s post will be a bit shorter than usual, but still full of thought-provoking ideas. There’s plenty to catch up on, especially on the front lines of climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If you celebrated the USA’s Thanksgiving holiday, be thankful for many things, including science. There’s a myriad of topics to discuss and inspire a sense of wonder.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A reminder that even though winter may be settling in across North America, your mPING and CoCoRaHS reports are still important. They’re not just for severe thunderstorms. Every single report counts!

GEOGRAPHY

The Mercator maps that so many of us are familiar with give a very distorted view of the world. How distorted? This article with an interactive map with show you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Interesting news on Mars. “Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what’s in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Oklahomans are suing frackers over earthquakes. I sincerely wish them luck in their pursuit of justice. Their defendants are capriciously deviant and very wealthy.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

People in urban areas are at risk of air pollution induced health problems with around 85% exposed to levels deemed harmful by the World Health Organization. These particles are too small to see or smell, but have a devastating impact.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What scientists are seeing happening to the Arctic ice is both surprising and not a little alarming. Another spot-on and apt description is that the current scenario is, “seriously weird.”

The first decade of the 21st century set the pace. From Climate Central: USA Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming.

Perilous times ahead in the USA regarding climate science & renewable energy. “The world is waiting to hear what President-elect Donald Trump has in mind for governing the U.S. Among the biggest questions is what will happen to the budget for climate and energy-related activities.”

An ominous note to what lays ahead in the world wide theater. In early 2017, the USA is poised to begin a potentially disastrous retreat from climate science leadership. China is more than happy to step up, don the crown and seat themselves in the throne. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

The new GOES-R weather satellite is the most advanced one launched to date. It will not only provide amazing data, but could save your life someday.

As expected, Trump intends to dump the Paris climate accord, but at least 71 percent of the American public support it.

chart_paris-agreement-survey_718x361

It’s been a very quiet year in the USA for tornadoes. As of November 21, 2016, 830 preliminary tornado reports so far which is well below the statistical average.

cx5qmmouaaaryfw-jpg-largeThat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links For November 10 – 17, 2016

Greetings everyone! How’s the weather in your neighborhood this week? Hopefully it’s to your liking. In parts of North America, we’ll be getting a good shot of cold autumn weather for mid November. In spite of that, much of the NOAA outlooks for the next week or so hint at relatively clement weather…which is good if you’ll be doing any traveling for the American Thanksgiving holiday. Regardless, be sure to keep tabs on forecasts for both your local area, destination, and all points in between. Things can and will change unexpectedly. It’s been a very busy week here with my dance card full and my cup runneth over repeatedly…so this post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE EDUCATION

The fine folks at Science Friday have compiled a very cool list of six things you can break down right now!

Much to my delight, “the Paris Agreement includes Article 12, calling for the promotion of climate-change education — and the 2030 Agenda includes a comprehensive Sustainable Development Goal on education, with a specific target on education for sustainable development. Education is key to understanding climate change — it is vital to learning to adapt and take action, for today’s generation and tomorrow’s.”

Like it or not, science and politics (both foreign and domestic) go hand in hand more so now than ever before. With the recent USA election in mind, a few prominent scientists shared their reactions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

For many years, a clean energy transition was said to be much too expensive and troublesome by skeptics and special interests. Furthermore, they claimed it would make consumers’ energy bills very expensive and increase operating costs. They were dead wrong.

Most everything we use can be recycled. If that’s the case, why don’t we do more recycling than we do now?

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Stop what you’re doing and take a deep breath. Chances are that the air you just breathed in and out is polluted.

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ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

October, 2016 was yet another record-breaking month for global temperatures. On its current track, 2016 looks to top 2015 for the year as a whole.

oct-2016-temp-mapFor October 2016, NASA’s map show lots of yellow, orange, and red. Simply put, those are areas where temperatures were well above average for the month. Map courtesy Climate Central & NASA.

Here’s an excellent piece by climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. “Dear President-Elect: Climate Change Is Not A Hoax, And We’re All In This Together.”

La Niña is here and is playing a major role in the ongoing drought and worsening wildfires in the southern USA states.

Regardless of who is president, climate…and nature overall…supersedes any policy designed to focus on short-term goals.

Ending on an aesthetically positive note, take a look at these spectacular autumn vistas captured by drones.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For October 17 – 24, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather, autumn in particular, is going your way. It’s been an unusually warm October across the Southern Plains of the USA with many areas running a rainfall deficit of up to nine inches. In the Atlantic, the tropical cyclone season is winding down. Much of the southeastern USA (North Carolina in particular) is still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Matthew. Looking to the future, NOAA has issued their outlook for the coming winter. Time will tell what comes to fruition. There’s plenty of other topics to explore, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION & PUBLIC POLICY

By an overwhelmingly large margin, there is bi-partisan support for science in the USA yet it has remained untouched among topics discussed. How can we make America scientific again?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Articles such as this one on air quality show the irrevocable link between meteorology, environmental science, and public health. “Clean Air For Livable Cities.”

Over the last thirty years, forest fires in the western USA have seen a dramatic increase thanks in no small part to climate change.

Considering the current divisive political climate, this should come as no surprise to any of us in the USA. “U.S. Senate Could Block Landmark HFC Climate Treaty.”

Very good news on the wind power front. “Although solar power gets more press, the wind power industry is growing nearly as fast. The (GWEC) released a historic report Tuesday in Beijing, saying 20 percent of the world’s total electricity could come from wind by as early as 2030.

Here are some startling images that speak for themselves. “Industrial scars: The environmental cost of consumption.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

NOAA has issued its outlook for the winter of 2016-2017. The main caveat is to remember that this is an outlook and NOT a forecast. Yes, there is a difference.

outlook_map_temp_2016 outlook_map_precip_2016

Based on recent NASA data, 2016 is shaping up (from a global perspective) to be another year where long-standing climate records are broken. September, 2016 stands alone itself on world-wide records.

Top climate scientists have just under two years (until 2018) to deliver a new UN report of dangers and avoiding strategies for warming of 1.5C.

Based on World Meteorological Organization data, a “new era of climate change reality” has been reached. “In 2015, for the first time, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere were at 400 parts per million (ppm) on average across the year as a whole, the World Meteorological Organisation’s (WMO) annual greenhouse gas bulletin reveals.”

The future to a young climate scientist can seem very daunting. Here’s an excellent Q&A with several climate scientists on their careers and the challenges they face.

A sobering read from a former US Navy meteorologist on climate change. “It’s Eroding Our National Security.”

According to the Danish Meteorological Institute, Sweden could be in for one of its coldest winters in quite some time. Long-term forecasts such as this are often a long shot and based on large-scale global weather patterns mixed with statistical data…so only time will tell if their outlook will come to fruition.

Hurricane Matthew may have been a “once in 1,000 year” event for North Carolina, USA…but it won’t take another 1,000 years for an equally bad (or worse) event like Matthew to happen again.

Just because autumn  and it’s cooler temperatures have settled in across much of the USA doesn’t mean the wildfire danger has decreased. In fact, many significant wildfire events in recent years have taken place in the fall. Wildfires are one of the greatest underrated environmental/weather hazards.

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That’s a wrap for this week! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers and a big “thank you” to my long-time friends in social media. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For October 3 – 10, 2016

Greetings folks! I hope everyone’s having a good start to their week. Of course, the big story this week has been Hurricane Matthew which left hundreds dead in its wake and an untold amount of destruction. It was a stark reminder than, in spite of a nearly decade long “hurricane drought” for the USA, many areas are still as vulnerable (if not more so) as they ever were. With increasing real estate development and growing populations, hurricane prone areas are still in nature’s cross-hairs. As it is often said, it only takes one…and it doesn’t have to be a major hurricane making landfall over a major population area for significant amounts of damage to personal property, infrastructure, injuries, and deaths to occur. The temptation to flee the snow belt or the extremes of the Great Plains and live in a year round “clement climate” that is warm and conducive to sunbathing in winter is strong, but, depending on where you live, it comes with a price.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

As I’ve discussed with many colleagues as of late, the attack on science isn’t just delegated to a few small regions, but has become a global menace. The challenge of communicating science to the public must be taken up by a science-savvy press and science educators among others.

Public misconceptions about many fields of study are common. Here’s an excellent overview of eight myths about the public’s view of science.

Communicating to the public about scientific topics can be risky, yet it can be done. “How Scientists Can Engage The Public Without Risking Their Careers.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

What’s next for Twitter? One of the biggest movers and shakers in social media is on rocky ground…and whoever buys it will determine its fate.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Americans are increasingly concerned about our environment even though a relatively small percentage of people surveyed are actively taking part in doing what they can to take better care of our humble home.

Well said. “If only we could see the air pollution around us we could identify the culprits and avoid exposure. From an early age we are taught not to drink dirty water or eat moldy food but we have less opportunity to avoid harmful air.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The duties that are required of hurricane hunters are not for the faint of heart. This is a very tough job that often goes without thanks. This excellent video gives you a quick overview of what goes on in those violent storms.

Adding insult to injury. Rising temperatures due to climate change are “loading the dice” for a permanently dry southwestern USA.

A sobering read from Climate Central. “Carbon dioxide just hit its annual minimum at Mauna Loa Observatory and failed to dip below 400 ppm.”

On the brighter side, 191 countries have found a plan to let airlines grow without increasing their significant impact on the environment.

This explains a lot. “The Psychology Behind Climate Change Denial.”

Finally, on a positive note, there are many ways you can receive potentially life-saving weather advisories, watches, and warnings…and that includes all of your mobile devices. Here’s a helpful info-graphic from the National Weather Service with a quick overview.

nws-mobile-device-infographic

For more specific information for your location, go to mobile.weather.gov ~ the good news is that as connected to information sources as we are today, almost everyone can get weather information 24/7.

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

Considering this comes from the Drudge report, I’m not at all surprised at its reprehensible, sophomoric rhetoric. Politicizing a weather event such as Hurricane Matthew is indeed, “deplorable.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 26 – October 3, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to your week. For much of North American, there’s a touch of autumn in the air while spring is starting to kick in for the Southern Hemisphere. The big news this week (and for many days to come) is Hurricane Matthew, the first hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic season to achieve major hurricane status and the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic/Caribbean basin in almost a decade. Matthew has provided a consistent forecasting challenge and will continue to do so for several more days. As of today 4 October 2016) evacuations are pending for many areas along the southeastern USA coast. There’s also a severe weather threat in the USA’s central plains today…lots going on weather-wise for much of North America…so lets get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

With Hurricane Matthew threat to many areas of the Caribbean (and North America), here’s some helpful information on making your own emergency preparedness kits. “Making a preparedness kit is one important way you can protect yourself and those around you. Remember that there are many types of emergencies – from those caused by illness to natural disasters – and you need different types of kits for a variety of situations.”

Further hurricane safety information…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Do you live in a noisy location? If so, it can affect your quality of life. Here’s a cool citizen science project you can take part in…find out how noisy your location is while supplying data for an important study.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Perhaps we’re not out in the boonies as much as we thought. “It’s tricky to map an entire galaxy when you live in one of its arms. But astronomers have made the clearest map yet of the Milky Way – and it turns out that the arm that hosts our solar system is even bigger than previously thought.”

New research on Pluto suggests that it could have a deep salty ocean.

Check out this spectacular view…the first of its kind…of a billion stars shining in the Milky Way galaxy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read on why you shouldn’t put all of your trust in a hurricane’s “cone of uncertainty.” Forecasters have a daunting challenge that is often made much worse by the almost unfathomable complexities of our planet’s atmosphere.

The NRDC has an excellent a concise overview on global warming that covers most any question anyone could ever have about this aspect of our changing climate.

A look into climates past. The longest lasting deserts on Earth are approximately 30 million years old and can give us a glimpse into future climate.

An interesting read on a surprising source of greenhouse gases…reservoirs built for many uses, including hydropower, drinking water, farm irrigation, and flood control, etc.

Part climatology, part public health in this read that, while focused on Australia, is applicable to all countries. Many in the medical profession are unsure of how to deal with climate change and its irrevocable connection to our health and well being.

Our planet’s future does depend on your vote. And this year, the stakes are higher than ever.

Speaking of the future, “Dear Tomorrow” is a project where today’s parents are writing letters concerning climate change to children of the future.

Finally, a sobering read that can be summed up by simply saying, “Science, Know Thy Enemy.” How The Attack On Science Is Becoming A Global Contagion.

Sorry to end this post on such a dour note, but unfortunately that is the current political, theological, and cultural climate we live in.

On a lighter note, I’d like to extend a sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There are lots of good times ahead.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 5 – 15, 2016

Greetings to everyone! It’s definitely been an interesting week with plenty of climate related news and, unfortunately, deadly flooding ongoing in parts of Louisiana. Some locations have received over 27 inches of rain. I’ve included an infographic on flash flood safety. On the home front, I’ve had a busy August with several projects that have delayed this post by a few days. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

The importance of the history of science to STEM students can’t be understated. “Why Science And Engineering Need To Remind Students Of Forgotten Lessons From History.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Are you using Windows 10? “12 Things You Can Now Do With Windows 10 After The Anniversary Update.”

There’s a dearth of manners in social media. Here’s a very nice read that’s badly needed. “Five Steps To Having Grace On Social Media.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA has just released over 1,000 new images of the surface of Mars and some of them are spectacular!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A very striking video of changes in Greenland’s glaciers since the 1930’s shows the dramatic effects of climate change.

Though this article focuses somewhat on UK and European cities, it applies to other cities (like Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas, et al.) that are prone to ozone and/or air quality issues in the summer months. “Pollutants React In Sunshine To Form More Pollutants.”

The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency was way off mark in a recent study that claimed that fracking and safe water sources can coexist in close proximity.

Speaking of air quality, southern California has been a hotbed of bad air quality for decades. Unfortunately, they’re currently having the worst smog since 2009.

Several USA cities are leading the way from fossil fuels to 100% renewable power. Let’s hope many more cities are bold enough to be added to this list…soon.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’re experiencing flooding or simply need a quick read  on flood safety, here’s a nice infographic from the National Weather Service in Norman, OK. If driving, please remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! (TADD)

Flood Safety Info

Due to climate change, the risk from the Zika virus the mosquitoes that carry it is becoming more than just an obscure annoyance.

In case you missed it, here’s a link to NOAA’s latest and very thorough State Of The Climate report. This is definitely a “must read” for anyone into atmospheric and/or environmental science. (PDF file)

As of July, 2016, the USA is in the midst of its third-hottest year on record according to the latest NOAA data.

Based on NOAA and EPA data, millions of coastal area homes and properties in the USA are at risk of going underwater by the end of the century.

No heat here. This amazing archive of ice cores is literally a look into the climates past of our humble planet.

Here’s an interesting take on what’s apparently a not-so-new rainfall forecasting theory. Scientists using satellite data and statistical techniques have proved that soil and rain are linked in an unexpected way.

As the drought in the western USA continues, another drought is growing at an alarming pace…and almost no one is talking about it.

Time to bring out the cardigans and parkas. Autumn has arrived in parts of Sweden and no, it’s not too early.

In addition to dealing with denialists, climate scientists are also saddled with a segment of the population with climate change apathy…those who think nothing can or should change.

Sorry conspirators. Your “knowledge” of contrails isn’t correct. It’s hard to believe there are people who still buy this rubbish, but then again there are people who believe the earth is flat, ghosts and spirits are real, astrology is a legit science, and the tooth fairy leaves pennies from heaven under your pillow.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun…and learning!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For July 5 – July 12, 2016

Greetings to one and all. I hope everyone’s week has been going well and the weather in your location is to your liking. There’s plenty of information to explore this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read. “Astronomers find evidence of water clouds in first spectrum of coldest brown dwarf.”

Talk about being lucky! The Earth could have had a searing hot atmosphere and Venus could have had a plethora of lush vegetation.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A new twelve blade turbine tower is on the wind power scene. Let’s hope these catch on worldwide!

Living Shorelines could get a fast track to combat sea level rise and wetlands, sand dunes and mangroves could protect shorelines more inexpensively than walls and bulkheads.

While turning plastic garbage into energy may seem a good idea, it’s only truly environmentally responsible if it’s done in tandem with recycling…so let’s NOT forget recycling.

From Climate Central: “The Fort McMurray wildfire, driven by drought and climate change, was the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history, ringing up $3.58 billion in losses, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada.”

In the UK, it’s time for a new clean air act. The current one is woefully out of date.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read on the importance of social media and dissemination of severe weather warning information from the National Weather Service.

It’s an absolute monstrosity that sixteen children have died in hot cars this year in the USA. Each one of these deaths was 100% preventable in every way. Few people realize just how quickly deadly heat can build in a vehicle in relatively mild weather.

Look Before You Lock Heat Safety

Just after midnight on 7 July 2016, a heat burst occurred in southwestern OK that made the Hobart, OK mesonet temperate soar to 104F. What is a heat burst and what causes them?

OK Mesonet MapOklahoma Mesonet map of surface temperatures showing 104F reading at Hobart, OK.

An interesting read on the vast improvement in the status of the earth’s ozone layer.

A climate trend that has gone from an anomaly to the norm. “We Just Broke The Record For The Hottest Year, Nine Straight Times.”

Here’s a fascinating read for weather geeks…the curious case of Earth’s leaking atmosphere.

What’s the July weather like in Sweden? It’s actually quite active.

Unfortunately, there’s no end in sight for the trend of diminishing Arctic sea ice…which just hit a new low.

Agreeing on how to tackle the challenges of climate change can be exceptionally difficult.

More data and less politics would be most helpful. “Blind Study Fails To Support (Climate Change) Deniers.”

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

If there was ever a reason for tort reform, this is it. The plaintiff in this debacle is quite a piece of work.

Someone please tell me this is a joke…and really didn’t receive millions in tax incentives. “Barge-Size Noah’s Ark Is A Creationist’s Wet Dream

That’s a wrap for this post!

As usual, I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For June 28 – July 5, 2015

Greetings to one and all! For those of you who just celebrated the USA’s Independence Day and Canada Day, I hope you had a great holiday weekend! Let us all take a moment and be grateful for the freedom and liberty we so often take for granted.

United States Declaration Of Independence Quote

Happy-independence-day-america-2016

Here’s a nice four-minute video with a concise overview of the USA’s Declaration of Independence. It’s truly an amazing document. Also amazing is the fact that the largest portion of our Declaration of Independence is a twenty-eight count indictment of the late 18th century British monarchy, and specifically King George III.

Summer has a firm grip on much of the plains states across North America. Unfortunately, at least at my location, triple digit head indexes have become the norm several weeks earlier than usual. Otherwise, there’s plenty to check out this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

EDUCATION

Many universities and employers are just now realizing what many of us  have known for years. Business schools are cranking out robots that are lackluster employees because of a deficit of liberal arts (and specifically science) courses as part of their curriculum.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Until Galileo kick-started modern astronomy in the early 1600s, the record of the sun’s activities was basically blank—or so scientists thought.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Juno spacecraft has finally reached Jupiter and will begin studying its mysterious atmosphere and what lays underneath.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The 2016 wildfire season in the western USA is just getting underway…and already it’s gotten an unfortunate head start.

When close to a record-breaking 36 million Americans took their holiday road trips this past Independence Day weekend, they were part of what’s quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation.

Would you like to lower your summer utility bills? I’ve tried all of these tips and trust me, they work!

A sobering video on the irrevocable link between air pollution and human health. No one is immune.

While on the topic of air pollution, an overwhelming majority of urban dwellers have concerns over air quality and it’s effects on public health.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An encouraging and thought-provoking read on six steps that we can take now that may help slow the progression of climate change.

Another warning from the “silent killer.” “Heat Waves Could Bring Lots More Deaths To NYC.”

I couldn’t have said this better myself. Top science groups have told climate change deniers in Congress to, “knock it off.”

There’s not been much news as of late regarding our Earth’s ozone layer. Fortunately, it’s been good news.

Nothing personal, but folks who’ve lived in the interior western USA may not fully understand what “air-you-can-wear” humidity is like.

“Defenses against storms and floods, built on past events, will fail unless emergency planners use forward-looking data that account for rapid climate change.”

Congratulations to the Wall Street Journal for demonstrating yet again that their sympathies reside with climate change denialists.

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad to have you along and hope that the information you’ll find here is helpful, educational, and useful in many ways. Glad you’re aboard!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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