Tag Archives: astronomical science

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For February 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. Here across much of the Great Plains of the USA, drought conditions persist. Not a few of us, including yours truly, are more than ready for spring…and the beneficial rains that are usually the norm. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project you can participate in from just about anywhere. The Great Backyard Bird Count is scheduled from 16-19 February 2018.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Happy International Darwin Day! Charles Darwin was born on 12 February 1809. Darwin Day celebrates his birthday and, “the achievements of humanity as represented in the acquisition of verifiable scientific knowledge.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft recently took the most distant photograph ever…and it’s amazing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Why is a big utility company embracing wind and solar? In parts of the USA, “wind and solar plants built from scratch now offer the cheapest power available, even counting old coal, which was long seen as unbeatable.”

Part of a monster “fatberg” has gone on display in a London museum. This is the disgustingly ugly side of “out of sight, out of mind” that tells a great deal about how we live. There have been plenty of these in USA cities too.

Speaking of waste, electronic waste (aka E-Waste) is a growing problem with up to 80% not being properly recycled or disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner.

Not only is the Arctic permafrost melting at an alarming rate due to climate change, but the permafrost holds a dangerous amount of mercury.

These images of rare species from unexplored area of Antarctic seabed “highlight need to protect life in one of the most remote places on the planet.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

NOAA has just released a detailed report on January 2018 in the USA. The first month of the new year brought (among other things) the largest drought footprint in nearly four years to the USA.

Below is a NOAA map of significant climate anomalies and events for January 2018.

Here’s an excellent essay on the complexities of climate change. The most important takeaway is the fact that our planet, and its climate, is not a “black-and-white” issue.

What causes someone to go from being a climate change denialist to someone who is sincerely alarmed about the changes we’re seeing? Read this and find out.

By some government accounts, no decline in the USA’s carbon emissions is expected by 2050. If there was ever a reason to motivate action, this should be it. We’ve no other choice.

Critical thinking is one of the most useful tools one can use to spot false claims, especially in the realm of science. Here’s how it can be beneficial when dealing with climate change denialists.

Spectacular Swedish view at -22C! To get a halo like this, you need just the right amount of everything at the right time.

PUBLIC SAFETY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

When given an evacuation order, many people choose to stay in spite of life-threatening conditions. Here’s an interesting look at a study that gives insight as to why some people don’t follow evacuation orders when presented with the risk of wildfires.

THE QUIXOTIC PUBLIC POLICY

Apparently, global warming will help the human species to flourish. It takes a special level of ignorance to back such a statement…but then again we’re talking about EPA head Scott Pruitt.

Backpedaling at its best. At least it is going in the correct direction. “The Trump Administration Brought A Climate Change Policy Back From The Dead.”

Last but not least, this should come as no surprise. “Fines Against Polluters Drop Sharply Under Trump EPA.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “thank you” to the folks who have been following for some time. I’m glad you’re all along for the ride! More fun to come!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For January 20 – 29, 2018

Greetings to everyone! While winter has many weeks to go in the Northern Hemisphere, our friends south of the equator in Australia have been baking in one of the worst heat waves in quite some time. This post will begin being published on Monday as of today…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

PUBLIC POLICY

The USA is quickly loosing its grip as a worldwide leader in science and technology. “China’s Breathtaking Transformation Into A Scientific Superpower.”

Any government shutdown affects National Weather Service employees. “How A Government Shutdown Affects Your Weather Forecasts Today And In The Future.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Whether you’re into weather, citizen science, or both, the mPING project is a fantastic way for you to send in real-time reports to help in very important weather research.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very handy guide to all of the full moons you hear about.

There’s quite a spectacle on tap for 31 January 2018 when our moon is going to put on quite a show. Here’s to hoping you have a good view!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Tsunamis are one of the most devastating effects of earthquakes. A new real-time tsunami warning system could save many, many lives in the future.

The National Weather Service has an excellent Tsunami Safety Home Page that has potentially life-saving information if you live in a tsunami prone region.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s nothing like cutting off your nose to spite your face. It’s no secret that our current presidential administration’s tariffs on solar panels will cost the USA’s solar industry thousands of jobs.

At least there’s some good news on the renewables front. Last year, the state of Texas got 18% of its energy from solar and wind power.

And here’s some more good news. “Natural Gas Killed Coal – Now Renewables And Batteries Are Taking Over.”

Here’s a step in the right direction for England addressing the problem of plastic waste. “Network Of Water Refill Points Aims To Tackle Problem.”

Plastic pollution, which is something that can be found all over our planet…even in the middle of oceans…is finally getting some badly needed attention.

This is a bit of a long-read on air quality but a very important one. Air quality is currently the leading threat to public health on a global scale. “The 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental health and ecosystem vitality.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Portal and Drought Monitor shows dry/drought conditions spreading rapidly across much of the USA’s southern plains. As of 17 – 23 January 2018, 76.8 million people in the U.S. and 76.8 in the lower 48 states were experiencing varying degrees of dry conditions.

A very informative and interactive look at USA temperature trends since 1970 from Climate Central.

In this article from Scientific American, climate experts chime on the myth that climate change and rising levels of CO2 would benefit plants.

An excellent read with Katharine Hayhoe. “The True Threat Is The Delusion That Our Opinion Of Science Somehow Alters Its Reality.”

Speaking of altered reality, there are publishers of dubious integrity who are more than glad to publish papers from climate change deniers that are supposedly based on “science.”

There is a new wave of mini low-cost satellites that could vastly improve climate research in general and specifically predictions of weather and climate change.

WINTER SAFETY

Reminder on safety when shoveling snow…there’s a right way to do it with the right tools.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my followers for being a part of this and welcome the new folks. I’m glad you’re along. Remember that the publishing day for this post has now shifted to every Monday afternoon with re-posts on Monday evening and Tuesday morning. It will also be posted on Tornado Quest’s Twitter feed, Facebook page, and Tumblr blog.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For January 6 – 13, 2018

Greetings to one and all! I hope that everyone in North America is handling the current cold snap well and you’re staying warm. There are at least two different viewpoints regarding this cold weather that will make for good reading. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Recent evaluation of these amazing images of Mars shows the existence of huge water reserves.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This was a long time coming. The UK has finally banned microbeads in cosmetics and personal care products.

In this day and age of bad news and non-stop contentiousness, here’s some good news on the renewable energy front. “USA Utility-Scale Solar, Wind Capacity Could Double By 2020.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA climate report is out…2017 was the third warmest year on record. Even worse, it was the costliest year on record for weather and climate disasters.

Here’s an excellent read on how the recent (and ongoing as of this post date) cold snaps across North America are clearly linked to a warming Arctic region.

A strong polar vortex (left, from December 2013) is centered over the Arctic. A weakened polar vortex (right, from January 2014) allows cold air to dip farther south. Credit: NOAA

In another story, here’s another take on the January 2017 cold snap. Ultimately, it’s up to the reader to weigh the information and, with critical thinking skills, form their own opinion.

The latest Drought Monitor shows dry to drought conditions affecting up to 67 million Americans in the contiguous USA.

NOAA’s GOES-13 weather satellite had been effectively retired. It’s like losing an old friend, but the new generation of satellites coming in the near future will be worth it.

Puerto Rico officials are re-evaluating the death toll from Hurricane Maria. As is the case all too often, it’s unfortunate that many deaths will be unreported and no exact death toll will ever be known.

Adding salt to the wound. After devastating wildfires, parts of California have been dealt another blow with deadly mudslides that have killed over a dozen people.

Here’s an excellent overview from Capital Weather Gang on how the California Thomas fire set the stage for the deadly mudslides.

And that is a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to my followers…old and new…in social media. It’s great to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For December 30, 2017 – January 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! If you live in North America, I hope you’ve handled the recent cold snap well. Many states, including Florida, saw the first snowfall they’ve had in many years. “Bomb Cyclone” was the weather term that was making the rounds in social media. Meanwhile, Australians are sizzling in a brutal heat wave. Truth be known, North America has been the only area on the entire planet that has really been cold as of late. Plenty more to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Hopefully, your night skies will be clear on 31 January 2018 for Earth’s moon to do something it hasn’t done for 150 years.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that Christmas is over, how do you keep that tree from going to a landfill? There are plenty of green options that are beneficial to our environment.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

As winter continues, it’s a good idea to re-familiarize yourself with winter weather terminology and the basics of winter weather forecasting.

A very nice overview of the early January “Bomb Cyclone” that affected much of eastern North America.

Speaking of the “Bomb Cyclone,” what does the term mean and why all the attention given to this event?

It’s not cold everywhere. Australians are dealing with a brutal heat wave with temperatures over 115F.

The latest Drought Monitor is out for the start of the new year. As of 2 January 2018, over 147 million people across the USA are experiencing abnormal dryness or drought conditions.

This is an article that can’t be shared enough. It’s an excellent response written by Dr. Marshall Shepherd regarding people using the winter cold as an excuse to refute climate change.

Scientific facts are hard to accept for some people. “A British government-backed research project that coordinates data from tide gauges around the world has hit back at climate science deniers who wrongly accused their scientists of faking findings.”

Evidence is mounting as scientists continue research that can link climate change to specific extreme weather events.

Even without the short-term warming influence of an El Niño event, 2017 was the hottest year globally on record according to NASA data.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 13 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you are. Across North America, it’s been rather quiet as of late…but with winter just around the corner, that won’t last long. One of the biggest stories of the past week has been the Paris Climate Agreement conference held in Bonn, Germany. There’s a link in this week’s post that’ll give you a quick overview. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Network Theory…a part of “big data” that anyone with an interest in the sciences should be familiar with.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

It’s not too early to mark your calendars for Citizen Science Day which will take place on 14 April 2018!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’ve seen ourselves in the heavens.” A large spiral galaxy 180 million light years from Earth resembles the Milky Way and has a pair of interacting galaxies that look like our galaxy’s two brightest satellites.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

While this essay on recycling is very thought provoking, it doesn’t really offer any sound solutions or remedies to our current recycling challenges…which is what we need now more than ever.

Speaking of recycling, electronic waste (aka e-waste) is on the rise globally…and there’s no end in sight as manufacturers keep making products that are meant to be disposable instead of repairable.

At the ongoing Paris Climate Summit, the USA’s agenda has been focused on advocating fossil fuels. Needless to say, this has not gone over well.

The “Quakegate” in Oklahoma just got more interesting. Can’t help but wonder who the “Deep Throat” is in this exceptionally disturbing scenario. There’s certainly a Liddy on the loose.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s some exciting news for weather data. NASA has just launched a new weather satellite that, along with existing satellites, give atmospheric scientists amazing forecasting data.

Here’s a concise overview of the latest Paris Climate Agreement conference (COP23) held in Bonn, Germany.

Here’s a striking visualization from NASA of 20 years of global data on climate change.

This is a fascinating study from National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Due to climate change, North American storm clusters could produce up to 80% more rainfall and pose a significantly larger flooding threat.

NASA had recently developed a tool that indicated how much sea level rise coastal cities can expect based on degree of ice melt and the city’s location.

Finally, from the Popular Science archives: Where In The United States Is Nature Most Likely To Kill You. It’s a complicated answer but in terms of severe weather, ‘hurricanes are the most expensive disaster, while severe weather (including tornadoes) has claimed the highest number of fatalities.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Feel free to check out social media links below and, if you’re so inclined, follow along and join the fray.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 12 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone. Running a day late due to recovery from a medical procedure and keeping tabs on two very potent hurricanes…hence the short post for this week. Obviously, the big stories this week are the tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and the central Mexican earthquake which (as of this post) has killed over 200 people. Tropical cyclones Jose and Maria have been front and center in terms of weather. We’re still in the “peak” of the Atlantic hurricane season, so there are potentially several active weeks ahead. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This is an interesting, and disconcerting, read on where a surveyed segment of society gets their news online. Unfortunately, Twitter, which is more up-to-the-minute and accurate, isn’t at the top.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Cassini spacecraft will soon have its swan song with a spectacular plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Many areas in and around Houston, TX that were flooded by Hurricane Harvey have an extra hazard to the aftermath…toxic chemicals in the flood waters.

Hurricane Irma left behind an environmental and public health hazard that has a level of disgust all its own.

The recent wildfires in the western USA presented another hazard to those in their paths or downwind from the fires…smoke that can cause serious health problems.

Plastic fibers have been found in water samples from around the world. If that sounds bad, just wait until you find out what it can do to your body when you drink it.

Our changing climate is inevitably going to change our diets.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest information on Hurricane Maria and Tropical Storm Jose can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s website.

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report. “The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for August 2017 was the third highest for the month of August in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back to 1880.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA

This week’s Drought Monitor shows a sustained drought maintaining its hold from the north central plains to the Pacific northwest.

Graphic courtesy US Drought Monitor

The long-term view of climate change is of the utmost importance. Future generations depend on it.

NOAA’s latest La Niña outlook is out.  “There is an increasing chance (~55-60%) of   during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2017-18.” By some accounts, the southern half of the contiguous USA will be warmer than usual. It’s also important to keep in mind that this is only an outlook and NOT a forecast.

Here’s a spot-on read by Eric Holthaus. “Harvey, Irma, Maria: This Is The Hurricane Season Scientists Expected…And Feared. ”

Why don’t more broadcast meteorologists convey information and/or educational information to their viewers regarding climate change? “Part of the problem is that while TV meteorologists may not be climate-change deniers, too many are climate-change ignorers.” It may not be the broadcast meteorologists that have a say in this…but the corporate media powers-that-be.

The social and psychological effects of tropical cyclones (and other significant weather events) always give a sobering reminder of the power of nature.

An excellent post by meteorologist Dan Satterfield. “You And Your Congressman REALLY Need To Read This.”

Severe weather phobias are very real and, for countless people, a major source of stress and anxiety that takes a significant toll on their quality of life.

THE QUIXOTIC

Maybe it was a slow news day. “Newsweek Gives Cato Institute Climate Denier A Platform.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 15 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking in your location. The big storms across the United States this week has been the solar eclipse, the first significant one for almost a century. The tropical Atlantic has been somewhat more active as of late. The major concern at this date (22 August 2017) is the remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey which could bring substantial rainfall totals to much of Texas and possibly Louisiana. There are plenty of other topics to touch on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

The presence of the troll in social media is nothing new. The sad fact is most anyone can (during a momentary lapse of decorum) can become one.

PUBLIC HEALTH

There is a myriad of hazards from weather and climate conditions. Depending on the time of year and location, bugs can be an even greater hazard…many of which spread diseases for which there is no cure.

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s an essay that’s quite good in reminding us of the fact that science, in its best form, is its harshest critic. It’s all part of how the scientific method works.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

After thousands of years, solar eclipses are still fascinating to scientists…and that’s a very good thing!

If you get the chance to watch another eclipse, please remember to take the necessary safety precautions.

If you missed the 21 August 2017 eclipse, don’t worry. There are several others in the coming years that will pass across North America.

Over the next 50 years, you can travel to a number of locations around the globe to witness an eclipse.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. “The increasing presence of wind and solar in the United States helped prevent the premature deaths of up to 12,700 people between 2007 and 2015.”

In consideration of the abundance of bad news, here are some amazingly beautiful images of our incredible home that will offer a visual respite.

 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For months, several Atlantic hurricane season outlooks have stated that 2017 would be an active year. This still could come to fruition. The most important element to remember; regardless of how many storms form, it only takes one tropical cyclone landfall to make for a major disaster.

Here’s a look at tropical cyclone formation outlooks from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center from 23 August to 5 September 2017. An active period is anticipated in portions of both the Pacific and Atlantic.

Graphic courtesy Climate Prediction Center

In California, scientists are taking the reigns of climate research in their own hands. Considering the current hostilities toward climate research, this may be necessary for many other USA states.

It may be August, but for parts of Sweden, it’s time for a touch of snow.

Studying climates of the past (paleoclimatology) is important because it can give us glimpses into the climates of the future.

PUBLIC POLICY

Considering all parties involved, this should come as no surprise to those of us who live in Oklahoma. The Sooner State’s new Attorney General is opposed to the proposed Oklahoma wind farm that could be the largest in the United States.

Nothing good can come from this. “US president Donald Trump’s administration has disbanded a government advisory committee intended to help the country prepare for a changing climate.”

In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence and a global consensus, some of climate change’s most vulnerable victims are the most fervent skeptics of science.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun. Tornado Quest covers a diverse range of topics including environmental issues, climate change, renewable energy sources, and much more. You’ll find much to enjoy, or provoke thought, with our accounts on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Links Week In Review For August 1 – 8, 2017

Greetings to everyone! This has been an active and interesting weather week across much of North America. Many areas that are normally broiling in temperatures well into the mid to upper 90’s are enjoying cool nights and afternoon highs 10 – 15 degrees cooler. I, for one, am not complaining one bit! A severe weather day for parts of the southern plains brought an EF-2 tornado through parts of midtown Tulsa, OK during the early morning hours of 6 August 2017 resulting in at least 30 injuries. Last but not least, the tropical Atlantic has been more active than in previous weeks…and the peak of the hurricane season is still to come. There’s plenty of other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Here’s an excellent read on communicating science to the general public. “There are too many important issues that science has reached a consensus on that the public has not.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This spectacular new dinosaur fossil is bound to bring great enthusiasm to my fellow dinosaur fans.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

This is truly amazing! “Humanity’s farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, achieve 40 years of operation and exploration this August and September. Despite their vast distance, they continue to communicate with NASA daily, still probing the final frontier.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Based on new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data, the USA’s Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone (oxygen-deprived water where fish can’t survive) is the largest since it started measuring in 1985.

Congratulation Miami! You’ve taken a very bold step. Now, who’s the next city with the chutzpah to make this kind of decision? “South Miami this week became the first city outside of California to require all new homes to install solar panels on their roofs.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent interactive map from the National Weather Service (NWS) in Tulsa, OK with a detailed survey of the Tulsa tornado of 6 August 2017. The tornado formed from a rapidly moving Quasi Linear Convective System (QLCS) and raced at almost 50 mph across midtown portions of the city. This event should be a start reminder that should be a stark reminder that, in spite of the climatological norms, tornadoes do not follow a calendar. “Tornado Season” in the USA runs from January 1 – December 31…and tornadoes can also occur at any time of the day or night and are not limited to forming under a photogenic supercell.

Check out NOAA’s interactive map of the history of the hottest summer day at thousands of locations across the USA.

A new visualization from Climate Central shows a history of global warming in only 35 seconds.

From Climate Central, a startling, but not surprising, survey. “The World Economic Forum surveyed 750 experts on what the most likely and impactful risks facing humanity are in 2017. They ranked extreme weather as the most likely risk and the second-most impactful, trailing only the use of weapons of mass destruction.”

Traveling by commercial aircraft can be challenging enough…but climate change could be introducing a whole new level of inconvenience.

For decades, the urban heat island effect has kept many large cities warmer than surrounding areas. Climate change is poised to make those warmer-than-average urban environments even hotter.

The monsoon season for Arizona, USA residents has been going full throttle in no small part due to the influences of climate change.

The USA isn’t the only country that has histrionic summers. This year has been a rough summer for our friends in Sweden.

I’ve yet to see one of these, but hope to one day…if I can only keep from blinking at the wrong moment! The common but elusive green flash of sunsets.

Truth stranger than fiction. Federal scientists, including those from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have published a 543-page report with startling information on climate change. They’re trying to get the word out before the current presidential administration can bury the report.

That’s a wrap for this post! You can also find Tornado Quest on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr at the links below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Links Week In Review For July 25 – August 1, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you live. Here in the USA’s Great Plains, we’re enjoying an unseasonably pleasant cool spell, but the summer heat will be back soon enough. For the time being, the tropical Atlantic is relatively quiet…but the peak of the hurricane season is still several weeks away.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Many folks have push notifications turned on for countless apps. For your own sake and sanity, turn them off. I only have text messages and emails going…and I couldn’t be happier.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

If you’re considering a career in the sciences, you’re going to need a thorough background in math. Start early…you won’t regret it.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read from Science Friday on how to view the upcoming solar eclipse safely.

The quote attributed to Carl Sagan that “we are made of star stuff” is emphasized even more so in this good read. “Half The Atoms Inside Your Body Came From Across The Universe.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This is awesome news for the Sooner State! Oklahoma will soon be home to what could be the largest wind farm in the USA! This is definitely a step in the right direction!

Speaking of wind energy, solar and wind are not “alternative” energy sources anymore. We have got a long way to go to make a dent in climate change, but fortunately, they are already mainstream.

Al Gore’s film “An Inconvenient Truth” has a new sequel that is not only an update but shows everyday citizens how they can contribute to helping our planet’s environment.

For severe weather and hurricane research, specially equipped aircraft are used. For research into wildfires, the planes used are a different breed of aircraft altogether.

As of late, the western USA has seen a brutal episode of wildfires with almost 5.2 million acres burned from January to late July 2017…and there are several more months left with no let up in sight.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting set of charts from Climate Central on risks to our way of life. As depicted in the first one, climate change and natural disasters supersede every other risk.

Even without an El Niño event (which brings warm ocean water to the surface, temporarily causing average global surface temperatures to rise), 2017 is already setting global temperature records.

If you’re a RadarScope user, you may occasionally notice that a radar is down. Radars, like all other forms of technology, require maintenance and chances are that’s why there’s no data.

Here’s a look at Tornado Warnings issued by the USA’s National Weather Service as of 31 July 2017.

Graphic courtesy Iowa Environmental Mesonet

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for fun. We’re living in interesting times, so hang around for some thought provoking topics.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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