Tag Archives: astronomy

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 22 – 29, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Across much of North America, foliage is at its peak for the autumn season and that’s a very welcome sight especially in the wake of devastation left behind by Hurricane Michael. There are several weeks left in the Atlantic hurricane season and that’s plenty of time for more storms to form. Many other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

Once again this week, I’m sharing the Hurricane Preparedness link. Regardless of the month, it’s never to early or late to prepare.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. We’ve several more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Substantial hurricanes and tropical storms have occurred in October and November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season. This is also applicable to any weather event year round; winter weather, severe weather, etc.

Infographic courtesy National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia, USA

That’s a wrap for this post! Here’s a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a “Thank You” for my long-time followers! It’s great to have all of you along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, so am I…let’s connect!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 17 – 24, 2018

Greetings everyone! This week has been an eventful one with flooding from Hurricane Florence still ongoing as of 24 September 2018. There are a few areas of interest in the tropical Atlantic, but we should see a relatively quiet week. Florence is a good example of a tropical cyclone that can cause substantial damage well inland from immense amounts of rainfall. For some areas, the recovery will take years. I’ll share the link to the hurricane preparedness page that I’ve posted recently. It will give many of you who live in hurricane prone regions a good starting point on preparedness and getting up-to-date and official weather information. There are plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my new followers in social media! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below.

Until next time…Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Top Science Links Review For July 16 – 23, 2018

Greetings everyone! We’ll be taking a look at the top science links starting this week plus a review of summer weather safety information. Let’s get started!

SOCIAL SCIENCE

The psychological ramifications of climate change vary widely. One this is for certain, the social sciences can offer a great deal of research studying the connection between human behavior and climate change.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool astronomy read. “NASA’S James Webb Space Telescope Will Inspect The Atmospheres Of Distant Gas Giants.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Though the article is from Australia, this applies to packaging worldwide. “Double Wrap It For Convenience: Excessive Plastic Packaging – In Pictures.”

An exceptionally hot summer in Scandinavia has resulted in a number of large wildfires across parts of the Nordic countries with Sweden being the hardest hit.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For many USA residents, the peak of summer heat can’t come soon enough. If climate patterns follow the norm, most of the contiguous USA will have seen their hottest days by the end of July.

Hottest day of the year based on the 1981-2010 average

The global land and ocean temperature departure from average for June 2018 was the fifth highest for the month of June in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back to 1880.”

“The year-to-date (January-June) global temperature was the fourth warmest such period on record.”Graphic courtesy NOAA

“Climate change isn’t the singular cause of catastrophe, but it has widened the expanse of social vulnerability to disasters.” Another sobering read on the state of unpreparedness that exists in the USA for the public health challenges of climate change.

The bright side of the incredible amount of Sahara dust that has drifted across the Atlantic from Africa to the southern United States is the fact that it’s squelched the possibility of tropical cyclone formation.

Here’s a look at the latest US Drought Portal. As of July 11 – 17, 2018, approximately 26.3% of the USA land area…or about 70 million people…were experiencing some level of dry/drought conditions. Among the hardest hit areas is the southern plains region.

Drought conditions are also ravaging many other areas of our planet. In Australia, these dire conditions can be seen in this startling photo essay.

Ozone is a beneficial element of our upper atmosphere. At ground level, it can cause significant health issues. Recent tests have found ozone levels in many USA national parks rival levels found in large cities.

Summer can be unbearable even without climate change. Add a warming world to the mix, and countries such as India could become almost unbearably hot for tens of millions.

SUMMER WEATHER SAFETY

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

National Weather Service Printable Heat Index Chart

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media…it’s great to have you along!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For May 8 – 15, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. The past few days have seen a substantial uptick in severe weather activity across the plains states of the USA. We’ve still many weeks of severe weather potential ahead of us…so keep an eye on your local forecasts. Hurricane Preparedness Week has officially wrapped up, but don’t let your guard down. Now is an excellent time to prepare for the storm you hope never happens. There’s much more to go over…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

When corporate interests are heavily involved in or sponsor research, it’s understandable why public trust in the research results drops like a lead balloon.

There are a few things that science may never have the answers to. Getting comfortable with the unknown, adaptation, and not living in a ‘black-or-white’ world is all part of understanding and appreciating the sciences.

In spite of the convenience of digital ebooks, there’s nothing like turning the pages of a real book.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Why do we build super telescopes? Our thirst for knowledge is just one reason.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Atlanta, GA is the twenty-seventh city in the USA to pledge to be powered by renewables.

Here’s some more good renewables news. “Gemini windpark off the coast of the Netherlands will eventually meet the energy needs of about 1.5 million people.”

Some very challenging times ahead for the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency. “The Environmental Protection Agency has a clear, one-sentence mandate: “The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The NWS Hurricane Preparedness Week has drawn to a close…but it’s still the perfect time to prepare and be ready. It only takes one storm.

If severe weather is forecast for your area, do you know what the Storm Prediction Center’s (SPC) tornado probabilities mean? Here’s an excellent explanation your tornado risk in SPC outlooks from Weather Decision Technologies.

After a brutal drought across much of the USA, relief has finally come (for the time being) and the drought coverage is the lowest since 2000.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows significant improvement over many areas that were previously dry while drought conditions in Florida and Georgia continue to worsen.

A very interesting climate read about a new study. “Emissions from thawing permafrost are now outpacing the uptake of carbon dioxide during the growing season.”

The link between climate change and public health is very real and irrevocable. “Climate Change Could Increase ER Visits For Allergy-related Asthma.”

According to an analysis for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) our humble home could see the goal to limit warming to 1.5°C easily surpassed within a decade.

A bittersweet “Happy Birthday” to the temperature spiral showing the rise of global temperatures thanks to humanity’s release of heat-trapping greenhouse gases.

For parts of the Rio Grande river in New Mexico, low water levels are a direct result of reduced snowfall which can be traced to warming temperatures.

An interesting read on the joint project between social networks and the role they play in decision-making about climate change adaptation.

Finally, a very thought-provoking read. “A Parable From Down Under For U.S. Climate Scientists.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. And for folks in hurricane prone regions, I hope your hurricane preparedness actions are going according to plan. Hopefully, you’ll not have to use them.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For January 28 – February 4, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you are having a good weekend and your week went well since we last visited. There’s a lot to go over from this week…and an unusually large amount of articles on science and public policy. For the near future, this will be a dominant topic in the sciences so get ready to see a lot of it in every form of media you can imagine which includes, but isn’t limited to, social media. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Mark your calendars! The March For Science will take place in Washington, D.C. and a host of other cities worldwide on Earth Day, 22 April 2017!

march-for-science2

There are a number of ways you can keep informed on the March For Science. You can visit their website or follow them on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Tension and stress over the transition. That’s a vast understatement. “Fears that Donald Trump’s presidency will suppress climate science at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are causing widespread unease”.

What would happen if the USA withdraws from the Paris climate agreement? While small gains could be made on the local level, the overall effect would be a climate-based diplomatic disaster.

One viewpoint feels that scientists marching on Washington, D.C. would be a bad idea. I beg to differ, but understand where the writer is coming from. Regardless, you can’t retreat from the front lines…we’ve a job to do.

Many scientists in the USA are very concerned about draconian cuts in research funding. In fact, many could be forced out of science altogether.

Don’t be surprised if you see many scientists running for political office in the next few years.

We got a good scare this week when it was reported that a climate change denier would be put in charge of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “But, according to the Commerce Department, which oversees NOAA, climate change doubter Ken Haapala never met with NOAA leadership and isn’t shaping its future.” So…for the time being…NOAA and the National Weather Service is somewhat safe. But, considering the ongoing Trump administration hostilities toward science, this could change in a most unfortunate way.

At least there’s some good news from our friends in Scandinavia. “Sweden has presented a new climate law designed to ensure all future governments have a “credible climate policy” as well as announcing an ambitious target of achieving a net level of zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2045.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A citizen scientist has written a very concise book on climate change that fills a niche that has been largely ignored.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Check out these amazing images from the Cassini mission of Saturn’s rings!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

This is quite an amazing video from Hawaii, USA of lava flowing into the ocean.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Renewable energy sources are making headway by leaps and bounds. A single wind turbine in  a 24-hour period produced an amazing 216,000 kWh (which is a LOT of power!) on December 1, 2016 at a testing site near Østerild, Denmark. That’s officially a new world record.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Meteorologists have come a very long way in forecasting winter weather. Here’s a really good read from the Capital Weather Gang on the amazing winter weather forecasting improvements that have taken place since the 1970’s.

For far too long, female broadcast meteorologists have been labeled “weather girls.” The fact of the matter is they are just as highly educated scientists as their male counterparts. The Weather Channel’s “Weather Geeks” weekly show takes a look at this irritating phenomenon.

Considering the political inclinations that are increasingly hostile towards climate science research, scientists who study our planet are understandably increasingly anxious.

Michael Mann, a well-known climate scientists, has strong opinions on the current USA presidential administration…opinions that reflect the feelings of every scientist I’ve discussed the current science hostile climate (no pun intended) that is ramping up in the Trump administration.

Here’s an interesting read on how a common springtime weather pattern and pollution transported from Asia combines to create unhealthy ozone levels for the USA’s desert southwest.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows improving conditions for California while extreme drought conditions worsen in AR, AL, GA, OK, & much of New England.

drought-monitor-map

 That’s a wrap for this post! A warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Week In Review For January 13 – 23, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to the week and the weather is being kind to you no matter where you are. We’ve just had a three day round of severe weather in the southeastern states of the USA including a High Risk on 22 January 2017. A High Risk is very rare, and even more so in January which is a month that’s not known for severe weather or tornadoes. Unfortunately, there’s a considerable amount of damage from Mississippi to Georgia with a number of fatalities. Simultaneously, the northeastern states dealt with a ‘nor’easter’ and California had an unusual amount of rain. It eased the drought conditions that have plagued that state for years, but won’t help much on the long run. This week’s review was delayed several days by the severe weather events and other projects. My next review will be published this Saturday, 28 January 2017. There’s quite a bit to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Who will lead NOAA and, ultimately the National Weather Service, during the Trump administration? This is something to watch very, very carefully.

Due to the lack of American lawmakers who have a sound scientific literacy, it has become increasingly important that scientists become more involved in the political process.

SCIENCE EDUCATION/CRITICAL THINKING

Pseudoscience is as rampant as ever in our modern day culture and, due to the proliferation of social media, is now more easily distributed to an unwary general public. To put it more succinctly…”This means that just because something catches our attention, or is easy to remember, it does not mean it is useful for understanding a new thing we want to learn.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out this very cool citizen science project that anyone can take part in. The awesome folks at Science Friday have a nice overview of how folks just like you can help out in year-long bird counts.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

How we process information (and where we get it) has much to do with how we interpret the validity of news…and decide on its validity…even if it’s fake and/or of dubious integrity.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read on how the universe could contain ten time more galaxies than previously thought.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Is the USA state of Wyoming trying to outlaw clean energy? If so, they’re cutting off their nose to spite their face.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read on severe weather High Risks and associated tornadoes that puts this past week’s severe weather into a historical perspective.

Speaking of tornadoes, is it really that cold inside a tornado? A new study on the tornado vortex says it is cold…very cold.

Since satellite monitoring of sea ice began in the 1970’s, the area of oceans covered by sea ice is at an all time low. Chances are good it’s the lowest it has been for many a millennia.

global-sea-ice-extent-2016The dark burgundy colored line in this NSIDC data graph represents sea ice in 2016. Note how it is far below other lines going back to 1978. Also note that the red line on the far left, representing 2017 to date, is even lower than 2016.

While on the subject of sea ice, take a few minutes and watch this fascinating and well produced video on climate change and its effects on glaciers in Alaska, USA.

Here’s a very good and thought-provoking read from meteorologist Brad Panovich. “It’s Time We Move On From A 0% & 100% Climate Change Debate.”

In case you missed it, “At the exact hour when the presidency transferred hands, the Obama administration’s climate and energy web pages became some of the first casualties of the new Trump administration.”

If the new presidential administration ignores climate change, China is more than willing to step up to the plate and become the world’s leader in climate science.

From a global perspective, some are of the opinion that we’ve almost lost any chance to stave off the effects of climate change. Personally speaking, I’m more optimistic, but we’ve no time to waste on getting the job started…and not letting any one industry or government…get in the way of science.

Fortunately, scientists are reminding citizens of the USA that science has been and always will be a major cornerstone of a civilized, intelligent, educated, and technologically advanced society.

WEATHER SAFETY

Here’s a great read from the American Red Cross on safety travel tips for cold weather conditions.

In light of the recent severe weather events and tornadoes, here’s a quick reminder from the National Weather Service on the difference between a Tornado Watch & a Tornado Warning.

difference-between-tornado-watch-and-warning.

Last but not least, some good news. NOAA’s new GOES-16 satellite is fully functional and is sending back some amazing high-resolution images of the Earth. This is truly a watershed event in the atmospheric sciences!

That’s a wrap for this review! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Have a great week everybody…see you Saturday!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 28 – December 5, 2016

Greetings everyone and Happy December to all of you! The beginning of “meteorological winter” is upon us for we who live in the Northern Hemisphere. So far, it’s been warmer than usual and mild…no surprise there…with drought conditions persisting and worsening across the western and southern USA states. As 2016 draws to a close, there’s not a little concern for the future of science in America. I’ve discussed the future years and what we expect..and will demand…with many friends, acquaintances, and colleagues in the scientific community. The consensus of deep concern is unanimous. That is addressed in several links within this post. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE EDUCATION/CRITICAL THINKING

Depending on which demographic of the population you ask, scientists aren’t the authority on science.

This article addresses a recent “hot button” topic of fake news and how we, as fallible humans, swallow hook, line, and sinker (so long as it meets ones socio-political agenda) without first resorting to critical thinking, objective research, and scientific analysis. Here’s an excellent “Ten Questions For Fake News Detection” tip sheet that will be of great help. (1 page PDF file). Friendly tip: never get “news” from Facebook…chances are it has as much valid sincerity as a snake oil salesman.

While on the topic of fake news, it begs the question, “If politicians can lie without condemnation, what are scientists to do?” Post-Truth: A Guide For The Perplexed.

As the economic and social impact of the tech world increases, the skills we teach our children for success in a rapidly changing world need to keep pace with technology.

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

An unsettling read from the Union of Concerned Scientists on why 2,300 scientists have good reason to be very worried about the future interaction of science and public policy.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Naming stars may sound easy, but it can be a truly daunting task of cosmic proportions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Over 100 million trees have died recently in California’s drought-stricken forests. With no relief in sight, this is an unfortunate trend that’s likely to worsen.

Nearly every piece of plastic ever manufactured still exists today. In spite of our best efforts in recycling, we’re facing a pollution dilemma with no easy answers.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The “Red River Rivalry” continues…but over a recent topic of discussion. Oklahoma and Texas disagree on how to handle fracking-induced earthquakes and the oil and gas companies responsible for them.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A “must-read” for those living in tornado prone regions of North America from Climate Central. “Outbreaks of tornadoes — where multiple tornadoes form over an area in just a few hours or days — are responsible for most of the devastating destruction caused by severe weather, and a new analysis has reached a worrying conclusion about the worst of these outbreaks.”

Unfortunately, we’ll be seeing more of this in the years to come. Basically, it’s an outright denial of sound evidence that has stood the rigorous test of the scientific method. “Climate scientists have denounced the House committee on science, space and technology after the Republican-held panel promoted a misleading story expressing skepticism that the earth is dangerously warming.”

Recently, the US Senate passed a major bill to improve weather forecasting…and that’s very good news.

Finally, with winter having finally made its arrival across North America, the National Weather Service has an excellent Winter Weather Safety site that addresses many underrated hazards that can inconvenience, injure, or even kill you.

And that’s a wrap for this post! A big “welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 26 – October 3, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to your week. For much of North American, there’s a touch of autumn in the air while spring is starting to kick in for the Southern Hemisphere. The big news this week (and for many days to come) is Hurricane Matthew, the first hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic season to achieve major hurricane status and the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic/Caribbean basin in almost a decade. Matthew has provided a consistent forecasting challenge and will continue to do so for several more days. As of today 4 October 2016) evacuations are pending for many areas along the southeastern USA coast. There’s also a severe weather threat in the USA’s central plains today…lots going on weather-wise for much of North America…so lets get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

With Hurricane Matthew threat to many areas of the Caribbean (and North America), here’s some helpful information on making your own emergency preparedness kits. “Making a preparedness kit is one important way you can protect yourself and those around you. Remember that there are many types of emergencies – from those caused by illness to natural disasters – and you need different types of kits for a variety of situations.”

Further hurricane safety information…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Do you live in a noisy location? If so, it can affect your quality of life. Here’s a cool citizen science project you can take part in…find out how noisy your location is while supplying data for an important study.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Perhaps we’re not out in the boonies as much as we thought. “It’s tricky to map an entire galaxy when you live in one of its arms. But astronomers have made the clearest map yet of the Milky Way – and it turns out that the arm that hosts our solar system is even bigger than previously thought.”

New research on Pluto suggests that it could have a deep salty ocean.

Check out this spectacular view…the first of its kind…of a billion stars shining in the Milky Way galaxy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read on why you shouldn’t put all of your trust in a hurricane’s “cone of uncertainty.” Forecasters have a daunting challenge that is often made much worse by the almost unfathomable complexities of our planet’s atmosphere.

The NRDC has an excellent a concise overview on global warming that covers most any question anyone could ever have about this aspect of our changing climate.

A look into climates past. The longest lasting deserts on Earth are approximately 30 million years old and can give us a glimpse into future climate.

An interesting read on a surprising source of greenhouse gases…reservoirs built for many uses, including hydropower, drinking water, farm irrigation, and flood control, etc.

Part climatology, part public health in this read that, while focused on Australia, is applicable to all countries. Many in the medical profession are unsure of how to deal with climate change and its irrevocable connection to our health and well being.

Our planet’s future does depend on your vote. And this year, the stakes are higher than ever.

Speaking of the future, “Dear Tomorrow” is a project where today’s parents are writing letters concerning climate change to children of the future.

Finally, a sobering read that can be summed up by simply saying, “Science, Know Thy Enemy.” How The Attack On Science Is Becoming A Global Contagion.

Sorry to end this post on such a dour note, but unfortunately that is the current political, theological, and cultural climate we live in.

On a lighter note, I’d like to extend a sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There are lots of good times ahead.

Cheers!

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 19 – 27, 2016

Greetings and happy Autumnal Equinox to folks in the Northern Hemisphere! If you’re south of the equator,  I hope your start to the spring season has gotten off to a grand start. There’s plenty of science news to peruse this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter could be going up for sale in the near future. Considering its my primary social media outlet, I’m watching this unfold with great interest and not a little concern.

Here’s an excellent read that you should take very seriously. “66 Ways To Protect Your Privacy Right Now.”

The FBI recommends that you cover up the webcam on your computer…and for a very good reason.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An interesting new perspective. “Scientists Confirm The Universe Has No Direction.”

A very intriguing read on Jupiter’s moon Europa and some of the newest “secrets” discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Here’s an example of recycling at its best! Check out this table made from plastic pollution that’s found in our oceans.

A very concise overview of the causes behind wildfires.

According to recent World Health Organization data, over 90% of the world’s population is breathing unhealthy air.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Frustrated by political inaction, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, didn’t mince words as to the immediate climate threat and published an open letter regarding climate change.

While ozone is unhealthy at ground level, it’s presence in our upper atmosphere is crucial. Here’s an excellent read on how and why ozone is measured from space.

A very impressive data set! “Longest historic temperature record stretches back 2 million years.”

Getting priorities straight with bipartisan support at home and cooperation with other countries is the most satisfactory path to dealing with climate change.

Is extreme weather driven by climate change costing USA citizens a lot of money? You bet it is. Current estimates tally a total upwards of $67 Billion US dollars.

Speaking of priorities, science is perhaps the only self-correcting field of study…and climate scientists are giving us fair warning that it’s time to recalculate the math on climate change.

“President Obama signed a presidential memorandum establishing that climate-change impacts must be factored into the development of all national security-related doctrine, policies and plans.” For the USA, this is good news. Like it or not, climate change has become an important part of national and foreign policy.

Here’s important information for folks who are deaf or hard of hearing and need important NOAA Weather Radio watches, warnings, and other important weather information.

The Autumnal Equinox arrived earlier this week for the Northern Hemisphere. Here are answers to the five most common questions regarding this annual event.

A lightning bolt in Oklahoma has been deemed the world’s longest…just under 200 miles in length!

Let’s hope this comes to fruition. “Senate Weather Bill That Supports Forecast Improvement Can Benefit All Americans.”

Can climate change deniers be some of the world’s most efficient contrary contrarians? According to this article, I’d answer that question in the affirmative.

Finally, a spot on info-graphic from Dr. Marshall Shepherd that should help you out when you’re dogged with that sophomoric statement about being “wrong half the time.”

cs9hjuexeaanjgp-jpg-largeI can recall many occasions where the Storm Prediction Center has been absolutely hitting the bull’s eye with severe weather outlooks…but if they’re off a bit (as happened a few weeks ago), you’d think it was the end of western civilization as we know it whilst people are calling for heads to roll. Much of the general public isn’t aware of the intricacies of weather forecasting and doesn’t comprehend the fact that dealing with a three-dimensional fluid that is in a never-ending state of erratic flux is one of the most daunting challenges a meteorologist/climatologist/weather hobbyist/storm chaser faces.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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