Tag Archives: broadcast meteorology

Tornado Quest Science Links For May 9 – 16, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good start to your week. There have been multiple rounds of severe weather across North America in the past few days, unfortunately it also includes fatalities which occurred during tornadoes in Oklahoma. Due to reviews of recent severe weather events and the pending severe weather today across the Southern Plains, this post will be another brief one. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL SCIENCE

An interesting read on those “Eureka” moments that many of us have every so often.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Check out these amazing images from the Hubble telescope of the planet Mars.

Just as no two snowflakes are alike, no two spiral galaxies are alike.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very important question for current and future generations. Can cities be sustainable?

In many of the world’s most polluted cities, driving bans or restrictions are becoming commonplace.

Since the Paris climate agreement, cities and companies have pledged to fight climate change. What’s next?

On the positive side, more cities are becoming greener with renewable energy sources soaring through the roof.

Details on the commitments of the U.S. and the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) on further climate action after the Paris Agreement.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Take a look at a very compelling climate change visualization that speaks volumes.

When studying the atmosphere, there’s more to it than the adrenaline rush of severe thunderstorms. Here’s an excellent read on the important study of the link between the Earth’s atmosphere and biodiversity.

A fascinating read on pinpointing the timing of when oxygen first appeared in the earth’s atmosphere.

2016 continues to break global temperature records with April being the seventh hot month in a row.

As the Atlantic hurricane season approaches, the National Hurricane Center has released it’s list of names for the 2016 Tropical Cyclone season.  Capture 1

THE QUIXOTIC

Somehow I strongly suspect that if the genders were switched, this wouldn’t have been an issue. “Reporter forced to cover up on live TV because her dress was too revealing.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

 __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 14 – 21, 2016

Greetings everyone! Whether you’re in the Northern Hemisphere welcoming spring or the Southern Hemisphere watching the transition to autumn, I hope everyone’s had a good week. A quick reminder that National Weather Service offices across the USA are having Skywarn spotter training courses. Check with your local NWS office for details. In climate news, sea level rise has become a topic of a great deal of discussion as of late. For people living around the world in coastal or low-lying areas, this is a serious concern. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Instagram, in their infinite wisdom, has decided to try what others have failed at or wisely backed out of…arranging posts in order of “relevance.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A major league public health hazard is taking place in Mexico where, “Some 1.1 million vehicles were banned from the metropolis, children & elderly were encouraged to stay indoors, bus & subway services were offered for free amid the first high ozone alert in 14 years.”

An excellent primer on sustainable living in your home.

A very thought-provoking environmental read. “Nature, All Or Nothing.”

Take a look at these spectacular views of some amazing sea landscapes.

A fire and ice challenge for drought plagued California. Preparing for a flood while dealing with a drought.

Could climate change and/or environmental impact warnings on gasoline/petrol pumps actually work? It’s worth a try.

Time to step up to the plate Oklahoma. You should be next in line for this. “Colorado Considers Bill To Make It Easier To Sue Big Oil Over Fracking Earthquakes.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The public’s common mantra of “We didn’t know it was coming.” doesn’t hold up when meteorologists from both the National Weather Service and media have been talking about impending severe weather for up to four days in advance. The fact that said severe weather event occurred in December is irrelevant. When is severe weather season in the USA? From January 1 – December 31. Where does severe weather and/or tornadoes occur? Wherever they’ve occurred in the past…which is in all 50 states.

A very fun read on the twenty funniest and most fitting names in weather, specifically broadcast meteorology.

Why does the sky look bigger in some parts of the world? It’s simply a matter of subjective perspective.

The latest US Drought Monitor for 15 March 2016 shows dry conditions spreading across the central and northern plains while the relentless CA drought continues.

From NOAA: “February Global Temperature Anomaly Sets New Record For The Globe.”

A very nice introduction to a frequently asked question. “Global Warming Basics: What Has Changed?”

Spot on. “There’s good news and there’s bad news: More Americans are concerned about climate change now than at any time in the past eight years. But that’s because the consequences are getting harder to ignore.”

A fascinating read on a new study that looks back on the Earth’s climate, and climate change, up to five million years ago.

An interesting primer on why Nor’ Easters can be more intense than the typical snow-belt snowstorm.

A new series of papers coming from the University of Manchester will be the first extensive study of European tornadoes in ninety-nine years.

This week marks the anniversary of the Tri-State tornado…the deadliest tornado to date in the history of the USA.

Here’s a fun read on rainbows…one of the Earth’s most quixotic atmospheric phenomenon.

 JUST ONE MORE THING…

Get up, and get out. Spending time outdoors in nature is good for your health.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers here on WordPress as well as on Twitter, Instagram, & Tumblr. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

___________________________________________________

Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Nov. 29 – Dec. 6, 2015

Winter precipitation across the USA Great Plains has been one big story this week. While long-term outlooks are somewhat ambivalent as to what the rest of the season holds, the recent short-term has been active with quite a vigorous ice and snow event from Texas and Oklahoma into the Dakotas. Having said that, a significant portion of this and subsequent posts will focus on the United Nations Conference On Climate Change or COP21.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

When Apps Talk Behind Your Back.” An unsettling privacy and security read regarding some of Google Play’s most popular apps. There’s a good chance you may use one.

Technology has it’s good and bad sides. Here’s a sobering look at some vital life and social skills that may soon (if not already) seem bizarre and foreign to the “iGens.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you like weather, history, and citizen science, here’s the ideal project from NOAA.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Spectacular! “This Timelapse Video Of Radio Observatories Is Just Breathtaking.”

Amazing images! “Fly Over Pluto’s Craters, Mountains, And Plains…at 80 Meters Resolution!”

Fly Over Pluto’s Craters, Mountains, and Plains… at 80 Meters Resolution!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The state of Oklahoma has finally created a website devoted to the recent spate of earthquakes.

After two years of silence, Sicily’s Mount Etna erupted this past week.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Renewable energy sources are now becoming less expensive to use than the (inevitably ill-fated) fossil fuels.

Christmas Island may be small, but the amount of environmental data it can give regarding climate change is big.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Hot And Bothered” is a very nice COP21 overview from The Economist (16 page PDF file).

Another very nice concise overview of COP21 from Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “So What Is This Paris Climate Meeting Anyway? The Basics Of COP21.”

Here’s another good read that will clear the air (no pun intended) on translating technical climate and environmental terms for the general public.

One very good question. “Why Are World Leaders Calling Paris A “First Step” After 21 Years Of Climate Negotiations?

Two viewpoints on COP21: Even with a mutually beneficial deal, the earth’s warming will continue regardless.

“In Paris, All Eyes Turn To The Climate Negotiators.” And as of 2 December, 2015, they were behind schedule.

According to some recent polls, most Americans “believe climate change is real, and want the U.S. to take the lead in fighting it.”

Almost 200 nations have agreed on a rough draft for reducing emissions and staring climate change in the face. This good read from NPR has a link to the 48 page draft.

Considering the uptick in online vitriol concerning climate change and COP21, this is a badly needed article from Dr. Marshall Shepherd that is spot on. “3 Reasons Why People Are Loosing Friends Over Climate Change.”

Excellent read on climate change, sustainability, and the public health connection. “A transition to a sustainable society is thus not about sacrifice, but is a prerequisite for maintaining our health and welfare.”

Some very nice interactive maps for exploring climate change.

The ongoing California drought may have a deleterious effect on your grocery shopping.

A good review of the Central Pacific’s busy 2015 hurricane season.

With that vast majority of winter weather ahead for much of the Northern Hemisphere, here’s some handy Winter Weather Safety info from NOAA’s National Weather Service.

Being a female in broadcast meteorology isn’t easy, especially in small markets. Here’s the story of the “viral dress” that tells a lot about what it’s like to be a female TV meteorologist.

THE QUIXOTIC

As I’ve heard (and agreed) with many comments regarding this article, “Is this a third-rate Guardian editorial piece or something the author was too embarrassed to reveal her/his identity on?” Regardless, it’s quite a rich gem.

And that’s a wrap! I’d like to extend a sincere “Welcome” to my new followers on social media! Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For May 12 – 19, 2015

We’ve had another active severe weather week across much of the Great Plains. One of the beneficial “side-effects” of the recent storms is the badly needed drought relief that has been felt across much of Oklahoma and Texas. For agricultural and ranching interests, this is really good news. Many reservoirs that were dangerously low are filling up nicely. Unfortunately, flooding has been an issue in many areas. It was also an active period for tornadoes, particularly in Oklahoma. I have a few links from local National Weather Service offices in this post with preliminary damage survey information. Since the severe weather keeps me exceptionally busy (and today, 19 May 2015 is no exception),  I’ll be on the brief side for this post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If, like me, you spend a considerable amount of time doing research work online in preparation for science-based articles, essays, or proposals, here’s a very handy read on research tools.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

SciStarter is your “go-to” website for all things citizen science. Check out some of the new projects they’ve recently listed!

This has been one of the “hottest” citizen science stories in quite some time. Did Wyoming criminalize citizen science?

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Oklahoma “quakegate” gets more interesting by the day. “Groups call on state leaders to take action to prevent more earthquakes.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Levels of ozone increase as the Northern Hemisphere spring weather warms. This could be making some seasonal allergy sufferers feel even worse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Much to the chagrin of many…”Networks Are Obligated To Preempt Your TV Shows During A Tornado” How some people fail to comprehend this leaves me…speechless.

A thought-provoking essay on the California drought which, as of late, has now become a new way of life.

Here’s a very informative read on what could be ahead for 2015 and the current El Niño.

2015 got off to a warm start…and it may have no place to go but up from here.

Satellites are incredible tools that gather a wealth of information on weather and climate…but they’re not infallible.

The “third stage” of climate change denial has arrived and become the current popular modus operandi.

Looking into the climate events of the past: Oceans may have played a part in the Great Plains Dust Bowl of the 1930’s.

Damage surveys are ongoing at several National Weather Service offices in the aftermath of recent tornado events: Norman, OK; Tulsa, OK; Springfield, MO; Lubbock, TX. This information is very preliminary and will be updated as surveys are completed. Check with your local National Weather Service office for any details on recent severe weather in your area.

That’s a wrap for this post! Severe weather could be on tap for the plains states this weekend…so stay weather aware!

Cheers!

 

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