Tag Archives: China

Tornado Quest’s Science Week In Review For January 13 – 23, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to the week and the weather is being kind to you no matter where you are. We’ve just had a three day round of severe weather in the southeastern states of the USA including a High Risk on 22 January 2017. A High Risk is very rare, and even more so in January which is a month that’s not known for severe weather or tornadoes. Unfortunately, there’s a considerable amount of damage from Mississippi to Georgia with a number of fatalities. Simultaneously, the northeastern states dealt with a ‘nor’easter’ and California had an unusual amount of rain. It eased the drought conditions that have plagued that state for years, but won’t help much on the long run. This week’s review was delayed several days by the severe weather events and other projects. My next review will be published this Saturday, 28 January 2017. There’s quite a bit to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Who will lead NOAA and, ultimately the National Weather Service, during the Trump administration? This is something to watch very, very carefully.

Due to the lack of American lawmakers who have a sound scientific literacy, it has become increasingly important that scientists become more involved in the political process.

SCIENCE EDUCATION/CRITICAL THINKING

Pseudoscience is as rampant as ever in our modern day culture and, due to the proliferation of social media, is now more easily distributed to an unwary general public. To put it more succinctly…”This means that just because something catches our attention, or is easy to remember, it does not mean it is useful for understanding a new thing we want to learn.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out this very cool citizen science project that anyone can take part in. The awesome folks at Science Friday have a nice overview of how folks just like you can help out in year-long bird counts.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

How we process information (and where we get it) has much to do with how we interpret the validity of news…and decide on its validity…even if it’s fake and/or of dubious integrity.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read on how the universe could contain ten time more galaxies than previously thought.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Is the USA state of Wyoming trying to outlaw clean energy? If so, they’re cutting off their nose to spite their face.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read on severe weather High Risks and associated tornadoes that puts this past week’s severe weather into a historical perspective.

Speaking of tornadoes, is it really that cold inside a tornado? A new study on the tornado vortex says it is cold…very cold.

Since satellite monitoring of sea ice began in the 1970’s, the area of oceans covered by sea ice is at an all time low. Chances are good it’s the lowest it has been for many a millennia.

global-sea-ice-extent-2016The dark burgundy colored line in this NSIDC data graph represents sea ice in 2016. Note how it is far below other lines going back to 1978. Also note that the red line on the far left, representing 2017 to date, is even lower than 2016.

While on the subject of sea ice, take a few minutes and watch this fascinating and well produced video on climate change and its effects on glaciers in Alaska, USA.

Here’s a very good and thought-provoking read from meteorologist Brad Panovich. “It’s Time We Move On From A 0% & 100% Climate Change Debate.”

In case you missed it, “At the exact hour when the presidency transferred hands, the Obama administration’s climate and energy web pages became some of the first casualties of the new Trump administration.”

If the new presidential administration ignores climate change, China is more than willing to step up to the plate and become the world’s leader in climate science.

From a global perspective, some are of the opinion that we’ve almost lost any chance to stave off the effects of climate change. Personally speaking, I’m more optimistic, but we’ve no time to waste on getting the job started…and not letting any one industry or government…get in the way of science.

Fortunately, scientists are reminding citizens of the USA that science has been and always will be a major cornerstone of a civilized, intelligent, educated, and technologically advanced society.

WEATHER SAFETY

Here’s a great read from the American Red Cross on safety travel tips for cold weather conditions.

In light of the recent severe weather events and tornadoes, here’s a quick reminder from the National Weather Service on the difference between a Tornado Watch & a Tornado Warning.

difference-between-tornado-watch-and-warning.

Last but not least, some good news. NOAA’s new GOES-16 satellite is fully functional and is sending back some amazing high-resolution images of the Earth. This is truly a watershed event in the atmospheric sciences!

That’s a wrap for this review! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Have a great week everybody…see you Saturday!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For January 3 – 13, 2017

Greetings everyone! This has been a wild weather week across much of the western USA with California getting tons of snow, more than enough rainfall to put a dent in much of the drought stricken areas, and even an EF-0 tornado near Sacramento. Much of the midwest is bracing for an ice storm and, as of this date (13 January 2017) Ice Storm Warnings are in effect from the northeast Texas panhandle across Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and even into west-central Illinois. As usual, there’s a plethora of other topics to cover. On a personal level, it’s been a “full dance card” week for me with many projects that led me to delay this week’s post. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Excellent read from American Scientist magazine on nurturing scientific literacy among the general public. What is meant by ‘scientific literacy?’

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating story of a man who, in search of a quiet existence in a remote area, inadvertently had a significant effect on climate change science.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read about researchers getting the first look at a very rare kind of galaxy.

A recent study found evidence that the Earth’s moon is older than scientists thought…millions of years earlier than previously believed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An idea that, for the sake of our future generations, should come to fruition. “How To Save $23 Trillion Per Year: 100% Renewable Energy For The World.”

Good advice to get the new year started off right. “All too often environmentalism is about stopping doing something, but maybe it’s time to be more active and start doing something instead?”

As of late, the air pollution in China has literally become lethal in nature. This article explains why their air pollution is on the rise again.

China isn’t the only country struggling with severe air pollution problems. Just five days into 2017, London has breached its annual air pollution limit.

Those of us in Oklahoma know all too well what Trump’s EPA nominee Scott Pruitt is capable of. Now, the rest of the country has the chance to find out for themselves.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting read on a study that says the frequency of large-scale tornado outbreaks is increasing in the USA, particularly when it comes to the most extreme events. A link to the original study is included.

Tornadoes in California? You bet. On 10 January 2017, the Sacramento area was visited by an EF-0 tornado.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows over 20% of the contiguous USA is experiencing drought conditions. Recent rain and snowfall throughout the southern states should provide relief that will be evident on the next Drought Monitor.

c1axvprxaaa0ot7-jpg-large

There’s often a great deal of confusion about winter weather advisories, watches, and warnings. This NWS infographic has got you covered.

winter-weather-watch-warning-advisory-infographic

Are you prepared for an ice storm? If you’re in the areas under an Ice Storm Warning, all the preparations in this info-graphic (courtesy of the St. Louis, MO National Weather Service) should be rushed to completion.

are-you-prepared-for-an-ice-storm

While it may sound bizarre, you can have a blizzard even when it’s not snowing.

In 2016, a total of 121 flood related deaths occurred in the USA. This map from the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center gives a state-by-state breakdown. High death tolls in West Virginia were due to June floods, Texas deaths from flooding in late May.

2016-usa-flood-deaths-map

Just when you thought the new year couldn’t get off to a more bizarre start. “House Science Committee’s Twitter Account Is Now Just Another Climate Science Denial Troll.”

While not necessarily representative of the whole of American society, this survey gives an informative ‘snapshot’ of the daunting challenges atmospheric scientists are up against when trying to convey climate science to the general public.

Another challenge is conveying the risk of climate change to the public. A recent World Economic Forum report ranks climate change and associated environmental factors as the greatest risk facing humanity.

Here’s a disconcerting ‘must-read’ on the anti-science crusade that continues to build steam in the USA. “The Congressional Attack On Science.”

A concise overview from the Capital Weather Gang of ten extreme weather events outside of the USA that killed thousands and cost untold billions during 2016.

In the Antarctic, an ice shelf is breaking up from the inside out. The ice shelf is bigger than New York’s Long Island and when it breaks off, it could result in global sea level rise that threatens many large cities close to the world’s coasts.

THOUGHT PROVOKING

Last but not least, when asked about death and the ‘afterlife,’ astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson gives a spot on answer that is particularly enlightening.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 17 – 29, 2016

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. For those in the USA who celebrated the holiday, I hope you had a very Happy Thanksgiving. I took advantage of the rare opportunity for some R&R time for myself, so this week’s post will be a bit shorter than usual, but still full of thought-provoking ideas. There’s plenty to catch up on, especially on the front lines of climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If you celebrated the USA’s Thanksgiving holiday, be thankful for many things, including science. There’s a myriad of topics to discuss and inspire a sense of wonder.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A reminder that even though winter may be settling in across North America, your mPING and CoCoRaHS reports are still important. They’re not just for severe thunderstorms. Every single report counts!

GEOGRAPHY

The Mercator maps that so many of us are familiar with give a very distorted view of the world. How distorted? This article with an interactive map with show you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Interesting news on Mars. “Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what’s in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Oklahomans are suing frackers over earthquakes. I sincerely wish them luck in their pursuit of justice. Their defendants are capriciously deviant and very wealthy.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

People in urban areas are at risk of air pollution induced health problems with around 85% exposed to levels deemed harmful by the World Health Organization. These particles are too small to see or smell, but have a devastating impact.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What scientists are seeing happening to the Arctic ice is both surprising and not a little alarming. Another spot-on and apt description is that the current scenario is, “seriously weird.”

The first decade of the 21st century set the pace. From Climate Central: USA Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming.

Perilous times ahead in the USA regarding climate science & renewable energy. “The world is waiting to hear what President-elect Donald Trump has in mind for governing the U.S. Among the biggest questions is what will happen to the budget for climate and energy-related activities.”

An ominous note to what lays ahead in the world wide theater. In early 2017, the USA is poised to begin a potentially disastrous retreat from climate science leadership. China is more than happy to step up, don the crown and seat themselves in the throne. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

The new GOES-R weather satellite is the most advanced one launched to date. It will not only provide amazing data, but could save your life someday.

As expected, Trump intends to dump the Paris climate accord, but at least 71 percent of the American public support it.

chart_paris-agreement-survey_718x361

It’s been a very quiet year in the USA for tornadoes. As of November 21, 2016, 830 preliminary tornado reports so far which is well below the statistical average.

cx5qmmouaaaryfw-jpg-largeThat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links More For September 5 – 12, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope that everyone’s having a great week and the weather is being kind to you. For the time being, the tropics are void of any substantial tropical cyclones, but that could change. We’re at the peak of the hurricane/typhoon season with many weeks left to go in both the Atlantic and Pacific. On a local note, the most intense earthquake in the history of Oklahoma occurred on the morning of September 3, 2016 as a whopping 5.8 magnitude quake shook the Sooner state and was felt for hundreds of miles. And, as usual, there’s plenty of interesting climate news to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Pawnee, OK earthquake of 3 September 2016 has been upgraded by the USGS to a 5.8 magnitude…the strongest earthquake (so far) in the history of Oklahoma. The saga of shake, frack, & roll continues much to the chagrin (and not a few frazzled nerves) to many residents of the Sooner state.

capture-1

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Short term gain with disregard to irrevocable negative effects on future generations. A new study shows humans have destroyed one-tenth of the Earth’s remaining wilderness in the last twenty-five years.

Some of these photographs are awe-inspiring views of nature, others sobering reminders of the challenges we face. All are, from a photographic perspective, spectacular images.

From Climate Central, a very good read on the irrevocable link between climate and life forms. “The soaring temperature of the oceans is the “greatest hidden challenge of our generation” that is altering the make-up of marine species, shrinking fishing areas and starting to spread disease to humans, according to the most comprehensive analysis yet of ocean warming.”

Good news on renewables energy sources is always welcome and this certainly fits the bill. The USA has unveiled its vision for wind farms off of nearly every U.S. coastline by 2050 which could generate 86 gigawatts of electricity from offshore wind which would be enough zero-carbon power for over 23 million homes.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The summer of 2016 was scorching across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic USA states, with several in those regions recording their hottest August in 122 years.

It’s been over a decade since a major hurricane has made landfall in the USA. “While the U.S. has been in a major hurricane drought since 2005, those top level storms have actually become more common in the Atlantic basin. The reason could be linked to rising sea surface temperatures — fueled in part by global warming — as seen in ocean buoy data collected along the U.S. coast.”

9_9_16_news_hurricanecounteditorial_720_520_s_c1_c_c

NOAA’s National Center for Environmental Information has a new way of displaying the USA’s climate data on maps. Check it out here!

We’ve a long way to go, but here’s a good first step in a long journey. “Here’s What China And The U.S. Just Committed To On Climate.”

California is spearheading the way to climate change legislation, but with forty-nine states to go, we’ve a long road ahead.

An ominous sign of things to come. A link between the recent Louisiana flooding and climate change has been established.

With glaciers disappearing at an alarming rate, scientists are storing pieces of glacier ice for safekeeping.

Poor air quality, regardless of its origins, is a costly issue in terms of finances and human lives and kills more people annually than all other forms of natural disasters combined.

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

If this is what sophomoric ne’er-do-wells do with their vehicles, goodness knows what goes on in their homes behind closed doors. “Rolling Coal: The Grownup Equivalent Of Soiling Your Pants.”

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That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m very glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 29 – September 6, 2016

Greetings to one and all! It’s been quite a week for the tropical Atlantic and Pacific with several hurricanes, some reaching major intensity, taking the stage front and center. Hurricane Hermine made landfall in the Florida panhandle as a Category 1 storm and was the first hurricane to hit the “Sunshine State” since 2005. As of this post, Hermine is off the northeast coast of the USA and still poses a threat in spite of having lost its tropical characteristics. In the Pacific, hurricanes Madeline and Lester took swipes at Hawaii and gave us a reminder than those chain of islands are very vulnerable to even the most intense tropical cyclones. This post will be on the brief side since the past week has been exceptionally busy with hurricanes and multi-tasking previous commitments and media requests. As usual, there are many good reads on climate change as well as other dimensions of the atmospheric sciences…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Meet the woman who first identified the greenhouse effect in 1856.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION/EDUCATION

An excellent read for those of us who communicate science to the non-scientists. “12 Tips For Scientists Writing For The General Public.”

Yes, art and science can co-exist…and even bolster the scientific mind. From personal experience (I’m an electric bass player) I can say from personal experience that this does work.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’ve just gotten a good look at Jupiter’s north pole…and it’s unlike anything we’ve yet encountered in our own solar system.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This is indeed an amazing and exciting discovery! “Live Thrived On Young Earth. Scientists Discover 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Fossils.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Just after 7:00 AM CDT on 3 September 2016, several midwestern states were shaken by a 5.6 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter near Pawnee, OK. Damage was reported across a wide area of north-central Oklahoma. This earthquake tied the 5.6 OK earthquake of November, 2011 for the strongest in the Sooner states history. Understandably so, Oklahoma ordered fossil fuel wells shut down after the earthquake. After a relatively quiet period of seismic activity, it’s no accident that the record quake was tied. The question Oklahoma residents must ask themselves now it, “When will another substantial earthquake occur…and will it be an even bigger one?”

Here’s a seismograph from the Leonard, OK station of the earthquake.

OK Earthquake Seismograph 3 September 2016

While on the topic of Oklahoma earthquakes, here’s a good story from NPR on fossil fuel production and it’s relation to the sudden recent increase in seismic activity.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE?RENEWABLES

If there was ever a good reason for creating a drought hardy yard and garden, this is it.

Wind power is really taking off in the USA and is now the number two country in the world in installed wind capacity (after China) and number one in wind electricity generated!

The long-term implications of this are irrevocable. “Natural Gas Is Passing Coal As A Source Of CO2 Emissions In The USA.”

The irrevocable link between our air quality and our health. “Air Pollution Is Sending Tiny Magnetic Particles Into Your Brain.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For sixty years, atmospheric scientists have watched a steady wind pattern in the stratosphere faithfully repeating like clockwork every two years. Without warning and for the first time it’s changed direction.

Here’s a very nice visualization of hurricanes that will help you easily understand the anatomy of these amazing storms.

What were hurricane hunters studying when they flew into Hurricane Hermine? Read this to find out! “Capturing The Genesis Of A Hurricane.”

In the northwest Pacific ocean, which happens to be the world’s hotspot for tropical cyclone activity, a new study reveals the land-falling typhoons have become more intense.

In spite of the cynics, it’s good news that the USA and China have formally committed to the Paris Climate Accord.

They took the words right out of my mouth…

  • For climate activists, the growing trend of climate change denialism in recent years isn’t just frustrating—it’s alarming. We know that the longer we wait to shift our energy sources and increase the efficiency with which we utilize the energy we produce, the more jarring the shift will be. Despite the powerful message that world leaders have sent by coming together in Paris to agree to limit warming to 2 degrees, currently national and global plans are not enough to make that a reality.”

Having said that, here’s the rest of the article on how to effectively communicate with a denier.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For June 21 – June 28, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good week and, regardless of where you live, you’ve had agreeable weather. As for North America, a high pressure ridge has effectively ended the 2016 severe weather season (for the time being) and most if not all severe convective activity is delegated to the central and northern plains as well as south-central Canada. The Brexit certainly has environmental impacts that, for those concerned, should be something that is closely watched. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Heads up for USA Citizen Scientists! Check out NOAA’s Fourth Of July Field Photos Weekend! Perfect way to contribute to citizen science while celebrating our great countries independence!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Deep in the middle of the Milky Way are some very big and bright stars.

Our sun is entering a ‘”phase” where it is void of sunspots…but that doesn’t mean it’s totally quiet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A “heads up” for folks in the western part of the USA. Large-scale movement is being noted in the San Andreas fault.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

“The planet, ultimately, does not need us.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Check out this good read on the importance of sustainability over recycling.

The 2016 North American wildfire season is off to an active start…and climate change is playing a big part.

A very sobering infographic on “E-Waste” aka those old desktop computers, laptops, VCR’s, digital cameras, etc., where they eventually go & the effects they have.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you following your local National Weather Service office? If not, here’s a handy page to help you find any of the 122 offices on Twitter.

Asia, Australia, Europe, et al. are no strangers to tornadoes. A recent tornado in China has resulted in dozens of fatalities.

An interesting look at public opinion and concerns over climate change.

With Britain leaving the EU, how will previous commitments to cut carbon emissions and climate change proposals be met?

The year 1985 was a very cool year and for those who hadn’t been born yet, “if you are 30 years old or younger, there has not been a single month in your entire life that was colder than average.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the adventure!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links For February 15 – 22, 2016

Greetings all! I hope everyone’s having a great week. The weather across much of North America has been relatively tranquil this week with unseasonably warm temperatures across much of the southern plains. As of today (22 February 2016) a busy severe weather day is on tap for Tuesday and Wednesday (23 & 24 February 2016) from Texas to the east coast states. Speaking of severe weather, all across the United States the National Weather Service offices are holding Skywarn spotting training classes. If you’re interested in severe weather and contributing to your community, I’d strongly recommend you take one of these courses and spend two (if not more) seasons as an “intern” with a seasoned spotter. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Fortunately, the United States citizenry has a satisfactory of support for science.

In spite of the optimism expressed in the previous link, there’s still putrid bounty of anxiety and antagonism towards science within the US of A.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Sweden, you are amazing in every way! “Sweden To Go Carbon Neutral By 2045.”

Some great tips here! “17 Sustainable Ways To Be A Better Person To Yourself And To Others.”

Four billion people are facing a life-threatening water shortage…and no, the USA is not exempt.

Very interesting, and not surprising, infographic on the world’s most polluted cities.

You know the air in parts of China is bad when ventilation “corridors” are being built so people don’t have to breathe the outdoor air.

Of great interest to many here in Oklahoma. “Does Living Near An Oil Or Natural Gas Well Affect Your Drinking Water?”

Another read for folks in Oklahoma who are constantly barraged with shake, frack, and roll. “Sierra Club Sues Over Oil Company Earthquakes.”

Climate change + drought = a continent-wide volatile scenario. “Mother Africa On Fire.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Interesting interactive chart showing temperature trends for over 3,100 cities in 2015.

The UK’s Met Office habit of naming storms is likely little more than misguided hype.

Some nice videos of climate scientists briefly discussing climate change.

A very important read from Climate Central. “What Scalia’s Death Means For Climate Change.” Like it or not, climate change has become as much a foreign & domestic policy issue as much as it is science.

A good read by Chris Mooney on where our Earth’s the most vulnerable regions to big swings in climate.

Two years ago, a large, inexplicable hot patch of water appeared in the Pacific Ocean, and stayed right through the seasons—until now. Referred to as “the Blob,” it’s gone away, taken by El Niño. Will it return?

Speaking of El Niño, it has passed its peak strength but impacts will continue according to the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO)

 My fellow lightning aficionados will enjoy this read. Lightning-produced ozone has been detected…and this could be important to air quality assessment and prediction in the future.

The University of Miami just opened a new research facility that, by creating a “hurricane in a box,” can help us prepare for dangerous and potentially cataclysmic storms.

An amazing view of ice shattering like plates of glass on North American’s Lake Superior.

THE QUIXOTIC

“Hairy Panic,” a fast growing tumbleweed with a name straight out of a third-rate horror flick rolls into an Australian city.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Oct. 14 – 25, 2015

There have been many big weather and climate relates stories this week but the one that was most dominant was Hurricane Patricia. There’s no doubt that Patricia was one for the record books, but the manner in which that was conveyed by mainstream media to the general public has brought about a great deal of discussion. The latest US Drought Monitor shows a startling increase in drought conditions from Texas into Mississippi as the western states drought has become the “status quo.” As for our climate, the latest State Of The Climate report has been issued and, to no one’s surprise, September 2015 was indeed warm…globally.

Shifting gears here a bit at Tornado Quest. Our weekly Science Links And More will now be posted on Sundays. As a result, and due to several other ongoing (but exciting) projects, this post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Fight For The Future is worth checking out, especially if you have concerns about privacy rights.

If you use the iOS operating system, there’s 184 new emojis to choose from…including a tornado!

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a list of six cool citizen science projects to help you monitor the environment around you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Mars has a very unique climate…a bit like Earth’s, and simultaneously a bit “alien.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

No surprise here. In fact, this was quite inevitable. USGS study links earthquakes due to fracking as far back as the 1920’s.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out. One of the most startling (but sadly not unexpected) findings is that during September, 2015, record warmth was documented globally.

The public perception of climate change is finally beginning to change itself and concur with the overwhelming scientific evidence.

This week’s US Drought Monitor (20 October 2015) shows the rapid spread of drought conditions from central Texas into western Mississippi.

Hurricane Patricia was a truly remarkable event in the eastern Pacific. Here’s a very nice overview from NASA with some spectacular imagery.

Near the height of Patricia’s intensity, this is what the Category 5 hurricane looked like from a visible satellite viewpoint at 9:15AM (1415 UTC) on 23 October 2015.

Hurricane Patricia Vis Sat 1 23 Oct 2015 1415 UTC

Finally, a somewhat technical but interesting read on atmospheric chemistry and air pollution in China.

I’d like to send a hearty “welcome” to my new followers on social media! Glad you’re along for the fun! 😎

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For April 6 – 13, 2015

It’s been quite a histrionic weather week for the contiguous USA. Some locations are finally warming after a long and snowy winter, the California drought worsens, and the Great Plains had two wild days of severe weather (April 8-9, 2015). This week also marked the thirty-sixth anniversary of the Red River tornado outbreak in Oklahoma and Texas, the sixty-eighth anniversary of the Woodward, Oklahoma tornado, and the fiftieth anniversary of the 1965 Palm Sunday tornado outbreak. I’ll have more on those events later in this post. Since we are entering an active weather pattern over the next several days, I’ll keep this post on the brief side and include links that I think you’ll enjoy.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking essay that confirms thought’s I’ve had for some time. “The Science Of Why You Really Should Listen To Science And Experts.”

Some great answers to, “Why Did You Become A Scientist?” My personal favorite…”Science turns “I don’t know” into “I don’t know… yet” and you won’t find anything more empowering than that.”

Ever wonder what the weather station identifiers mean? Here’s a handy essay that explains it all.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out this very cool soil collection program. Best of all…it’s free!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Oklahoma Geological Survey will be adding another analyst to its ranks to keep track of the smaller earthquakes that, as of late, been occurring almost daily in the Sooner state.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

My beloved Brontosaurus has been raised from the dead so to speak. Welcome (back) to the dinosaur club!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

A well written guide to California’s water crisis and the challenges faced by those dealing with it first hand.

Is there a bright side to the devastating California drought? Yes…and it’s renewable!

Another bright side to the California drought is an optimistic, proactive state of mind.

A mass extinction that occurred 252 million years ago could give us hints at to how the increasing acidity in our oceans could affect current and future life forms.

Here’s a very nice infographic on a highly underrated practice: Upcycling.

China will surpass the  USA as the top producer of greenhouse gas emissions.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

It’s always fun to repost everyone’s favorite wind map!

A very nice climate resource: The US Climate Resilience Toolkit.

I love space exploration as much as any other science fan…but have often wondered why physicists immediately leap at careers in astronomy or cosmology. It’s time for a change because, “Climatologists To Physicists: Your Planet Needs You.”

The TRMM rainfall satellite mission has finally come to an end after seventeen years. Fortunately, there’s another satellite waiting to carry on the torch.

Could El Nino last all of 2015? If so, this summer will be incredibly interesting.

While Rolling Stone magazine isn’t know for its science writing, here’s a well-written thought-provoking read. “The Pentagon and Climate Change: How Deniers Put National Security At Risk.”

Preliminary tornado/storm surveys from the Chicago National Weather Service on the severe weather events of 9 April, 2015. Until EF Scale rating are finalized and a comprehensive analysis is completed of the entire damage path, take with a grain of salt any unofficial or hyped rumors.

In weather history:

THE QUIXOTIC SIDE OF THE HUMAN ANIMAL

Yet another state has clamped down (aka censored) the term “climate change.”

In spite of overwhelming evidence, no end in sight on this. “Meet The United States Of Divided Climate Beliefs.”

And that’s a wrap for this post…

I’d like to welcome my new followers on Twitter, Instagram, WordPress, About.Me, Facebook, and Tumblr. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For March 2 – 9, 2015

After the last winter storm which brought significant snowfall from west Texas to the east coast, we’ve finally gotten a temporary respite across the contiguous 48 states. The sedate weather we’re enjoying now is the quiet before the storm…literally. The spring severe weather season is, for all practical matters, already upon us. This would be an excellent time to make sure your emergency kit is in order, your NOAA weather radio is fully functional, and you know how to get timely severe weather watch and warning information from your local National Weather Service office and the broadcast meteorologists of your choice. On the home front, it’s been another week with a full dance card. This post will, as many are during the spring and early summer, on the brief side. Preparing for the severe weather season often takes a bit of time, especially when doing double duty as a Skywarn spotter and double checking the “to do” list for storm chasing.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Daylight Saving Time is archaic and anachronistic at best…and that’s the nicest thing I can say about such old school nonsense. Adding insult to injury, it also costs you money.

The problem isn’t “scienceyness” but the tendency for mainstream media to water down science stories for the general public. “John/Jane Q Public” isn’t as scientific illiterate as many think.

SOCIAL MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY

A very good essay on over two dozen social media rules…which ones you can break, which ones you can’t, and which ones will cost you followers.

I’ve been giving the beta version of the Vivaldi browser a spin…and it could be a competitor to be reckoned with if it’s done right.

Google may begin rating website rankings on facts rather than links. If this comes to fruition, hopefully it’ll keep the shills and hype-mongers at bay.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY/RENEWABLES/RECYCLING

The K-Cups are convenient, but they are (no pun intended) a brewing problem.

Shortages of fresh water in the future could lead to some very unpleasant patterns in human behavior.

The plot thickens in Oklahoma as “quakegate” gets more interesting by the week. “Emails describe meetings between oil industry, earthquake researchers.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

To describe February across the contiguous 48 USA as fire and ice would be an understatement. While the west basked in warmth, the east shivered under record breaking snowfalls. The NOAA National Climactic Data Center’s State Of The Climate report has all the details.

According to this study, a revision of Tornado Watches based on the likelihood of tornadoes could help with public safety.

Speaking of tornado watches, spring, and the severe weather trimmings, is on our doorstep. Are you ready?

A spot-on must read by Marshall Shepherd and Chuck Doswell…”Standing Up For Meteorologists.”

A very thought-provoking read by Bill McKibben: “Climate fight won’t wait for Paris: vive la résistance.”

Will the Paris climate summit accomplish enough? Time will tell. Many aren’t optimistic.

Semantics do matter. “Call Them Climate Deniers, Not Skeptics.”

Considering the fact that everyone on planet Earth shares the same atmosphere, it’s no surprise that China’s pollution could have ties to the USA’s cold, snowy winters.

Those snowy winters result in many challenges…including a downturn in the local economies.

El Nino finally made an appearance, but not in time to help the ongoing drought in many parts of the western USA.

And that’s a wrap for this post…see you good folks next time!

Cheers!

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