Tag Archives: citizen science

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 30 – August 6, 2018

Greetings everyone! To say that the past week has been uneventful is a vast understatement. The wildfires raging across several areas of North America have been the main headlines, but several areas in the Northern Hemisphere have been dealing with a searing heat wave that’s breaking many records. This week’s post has many summer heat safety links that are very informative. Lastly, with the arrival of August, the potential for Atlantic tropical cyclone activity ramps up. While the Atlantic basin is quiet, now is the time to prepare…and this week’s post also includes many links on hurricane preparedness.

Here’s a look at a selection of this week’s top links.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

The CoCoRaHS project is a great way to combine citizen science with an interest in weather. Check out the CoCoRaHS website to find out how you can participate!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The ongoing wildfires in California, USA have become deadly and out-of-control in historic proportions.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For the tens of millions of people across the USA who work outside, a warming planet and heatwaves are a constant hazard…and it’s only going to get worse. Not only will health and productivity suffer, but there are economic ramifications as well.

This is a very refreshing change of pace concerning the challenges we face with climate change. “An Optimist’s Guide To Solving Climate Change And Saving The World.”

Air quality is more than the smog of days gone by. It’s a very dangerous weather condition that still affects many cities across the world. Here’s a comprehensive guide to air quality that covers many topics including wildfire smoke and ozone.

While on the topic of air quality, a disturbing trend has been happening as of late. CFC’s, the very harmful chemicals that wrecked havoc on the earth’s ozone layer and were banned in the 1980’s are making a mysterious comeback.

How many people did Hurricane Maria kill in Puerto Rico? As is often the case with major hurricanes that strike heavily populated areas, the exact death toll may never be known.

Here’s an interesting review of a report overseen by NOAA and the American Meteorological Society. 2017 was the warmest year without an El Niño recorded on Earth.

You can read the official NOAA State Of The Climate report with links to further information here.

https://www.climate.gov/sites/default/files/SotC2017_08_VeryWarmDays_combo_large.png

Last but not least, here’s an overview from NOAA of global surface temperatures that compares 2017 to the 1981-2010 data.

https://www.climate.gov/sites/default/files/SotC2017_01_GlobalSurfaceTemps_combo_large.jpg

SUMMER SAFETY

For folks in the Northern Hemisphere, summer is still going full force. Many areas, including parts of Scandinavia, are dealing with record-breaking heat. Regardless of where you live, summer heat and UV rays are something you need to be aware of. Here are some summer safety links with information on everything from avoiding heat illnesses to UV and sun protection. Keep your NOAA weather radio in good working order too. It’s a great way to get your local forecasts and any related information regarding hot temperatures and the heat index.

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

National Weather Service Printable Heat Index Chart

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

With the arrival of August, the chances of activity in the Atlantic basin increases dramatically. Here are a few hurricane preparedness links to help you get started in preparing for the storm you hope never happens.

FEMA Ready.gov Hurricane Preparedness

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For July 23 – 30, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an interesting time for many areas in the Northern Hemisphere…and not in a good way. From heatwaves to wildfires to flooding…many areas are dealing with conditions rarely or never experienced before. Let’s get started on this week’s links.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very good example of how tracking posts on Twitter by citizen scientists and other concerned citizens are helping forecasters keep track of the smoky skies that result from the numerous USA wildfires.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Synthetic textiles have been a major advancement in the apparel industry. The problem is the minute microfibers that make their way from our clothing into rivers, streams, oceans, and even the air we breathe.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This is the latest three-month temperature outlook from NOAA for the period of August through October 2018. For the most part, all of the contiguous USA (save for part of the northern plains) is likely to be above average in temperatures.

Three-month Temperature Outlook current snapshot

Image courtesy NOAA

Here’s a fantastic cloud chart from NOAA & NASA in a printable, two page PDF format. Knowing your clouds is an essential part of understanding how our incredible planet works.

If anyone knows about the importance of climate change and maintaining military security and readiness, it’s the USA’s armed forces. For all branches, climate change is a clear and present danger.

In recent days, stark images have come from around the world of everything from wildfires, heat waves, and flooding. They’re all signs of climate change in progress.

The Carr Fire in California is just one of many devastating wildfires across North America…drought, dry vegetation, and a warming climate all play a part.

Here’s another look at a summer that has been anything but tranquil, especially for the Northern Hemisphere.

This summer has been a scorcher for the UK with temperatures in the mid 90’s F reported at London’s Heathrow Airport. Is this the new normal? By all indications, the answer is, “Yes.”

A massive amount of dust from Africa is helping to keep some storms in Texas from forming…and keeping the Atlantic tropical cyclone formation in check.

dust map

Image courtesy NASA Earth Observatory

An excellent climate read. “Droughts, Heatwaves, And Floods: How To Tell When Climate Change Is To Blame.” In the future, atmospheric scientists can better assess climate change’s influence on many extreme climate and weather events.

Graphic via Nature News

Here’s a very thought provoking read that’s worth going over several times. “We Should Never Have Called It Earth.”

Last but not least, a look at climate change coverage and for-profit media. Is that topic a “ratings killer?”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media and a “thank you” for my long-term followers. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. There are a few changes that this blog will be going through over the months to come…I think you’ll enjoy them!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For July 9 – 16, 2018

Greetings everyone! For folks in the Northern Hemisphere, I hope you’re keeping your cool. Yes, many areas  are in the climatological peak of summer heating, but there are also a number of areas experiencing unusual summer heat. Regardless, take it easy out there. As usual, plenty of topics to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This is one of the most liberating experiences I’ve had in some time. “On The 10th Anniversary Of The App Store, it’s time to delete most of your apps.”

Online harassment is an almost unavoidable feature of the online world. As of late, it has taken on particularly vitriolic proportions. “Roughly four-in-ten Americans have personally experienced online harassment, and 62% consider it a major problem.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A good read on how public/personal health and air quality issues turned to citizen science for data collection.

Coming in contact with ticks is no fun…but some intrepid folks have done just that for scientists to study the ticks that bit them and whether or not they carried life altering viruses.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Getting people to the point where they realize they’re buying a product & also borrowing the packaging. “Can Norway help us solve the plastic crisis, one bottle at a time?”

What was once thought to be pristine areas within Antarctic fjords have been found to contain levels of microplastics that rival urban areas.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A look back at June 2018 from NOAA. “The June contiguous U.S. temperature was 71.5°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average. Only June 1933 and 2016 were warmer for the nation.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA

As of 9 July 2018, there have been six weather and climate disaster events in the USA with losses exceeding $1 billion dollars.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

A story like this says as much about human behavior and the general public’s attitude toward scientific evidence as it does the ongoing heat wave and climate change.

Speaking of human behavior and science, people’s social network can have a significant effect on their behavior when faced with a natural disaster.

This is a fascinating and very detailed read on the importance of ocean temperatures, why they’re studied, and their importance to climate change.

As sea levels rise, much of our infrastructure, including the power stations and cables that control the internet we all use, are in a state of peril…and disruption.

An excellent essay from Dr. Marshall Shepherd on preventing weather related fatalities at outdoor sporting and concert events.

Forecasting the intensity of tropical cyclones is one of the most daunting forecasting challenges a meteorologist can face.

From the Climate Prediction Center, the latest technical El Nino diagnostic discussion.

Just for reference, here is a map of the contiguous USA and the warmest day of the year based on climate data going back to 1981.

Map courtesty NOAA

THE QUIXOTIC

Last but not least, I’ll let this article speak for itself. “That Self-Styled “Very Stable Genius” Is A Danger To Stability.”

FYI: If you see any ads on this blog, they are from WordPress and not me. I apologize for any inconvenience they may cause.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new social media followers and a big “Thank You” to everyone…I appreciate all of you!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 18 – 25, 2018

Greetings all! It’s been a busy period for severe weather across the Great Plains of the USA with several powerful clusters of thunderstorms traveling hundreds of miles across several states. In stark contrast, the tropical Atlantic is very quiet, but that will change in the months to come. Heat will also be settling in across many areas in North American and the European continent. Again this week I’ve included several links for summer heat and hurricane preparedness that I hope you’ll find useful. Plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Since 2005, Firefox has been my browser of choice. Today, it’s leaner and faster than ever…and I couldn’t be happier. Like most folks, I use more than one browser, but Firefox has always been at the top of my favorites list.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project where you can help NOAA research with a free app that helps document the Earth’s constantly changing magnetic field.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It’s challenging to cut single use plastics, but it can be done. Here’s a good read on the problem and some tips on how to reduce your use of plastics in the long term.

Wind energy in the USA’s Great Plains is very cheap…and getting more affordable by the day. Fortunately, this part of the country is perfect for this kind of renewable energy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a very thorough read from the Union Of Concerned Scientists. “The Science Connecting Extreme Weather To Climate Change. (2018)

The latest US Drought Monitor shows some improvement in scattered locations, but extreme and exceptional conditions persist from UT & AZ into OK & TX.

The Earth’s oceans are becoming more acidic due to carbon emissions which shows the irrevocable climate/ocean link.

WEATHER SAFETY: SUMMER HEAT

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

WEATHER SAFETY: HURRICANES/TROPICAL CYCLONES

The Atlantic ocean is quiet for now and there’s no hint of tropical cyclone development in the near future. Nevertheless, this is the perfect time to prepare for tropical cyclones. Waiting until everyone is in panic mode is the worst way possible to handle a potentially life threatening situation. It’s also important to keep in mind that most deaths from tropical cyclones comes from flooding…not wind. Remember…it only takes one storm to make for a major disaster.

 

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

THE QUIXOTIC

If this doesn’t beat all, I don’t know what does. “The EPA Thinks Its Hurricane Response Was So Great It Ordered Special Coins For Everyone.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I hope all of you are having a great start to summer…or winter…depending on which hemisphere you live in. A big “Thank You” to all my followers in all my social media outlets. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun. There’s plenty more to come!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 28 – June 4, 2018

Greetings everyone! With the beginning of June, the official Atlantic hurricane season has started. Oddly enough, it hasn’t been quiet. We’ve already had Tropical Storm Alberto make landfall on the Florida Panhandle spreading flooding rains across several states. As is the case with most hurricanes (at least in North America), inland flooding and not wind is the deadliest factor. I’ll start off this week’s post with several links to help you prepare for the season that’s already started with one storm. There’s also plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HURRICANE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters and Emergencies

10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina approaching the USA Gulf Coast in August, 2005. Image courtesy NOAA.

NOAA Predicts 2018 Hurricane Season Could Be Above-Normal ...

This is NOAA’s list of names for 2018’s Atlantic Tropical Cyclones. As of 4 June 2018, Beryl will be our next named storm. Let’s hope we don’t make it to William.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into flowers, especially exotic ones, and have an interest in citizen science, here’s a project involving both of those interests that you can do from home on your computer.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Mount Kilauea has been erupting for over 30 days. With no end in sight, it’s activity has given volcanologists an excellent opportunity to study its behavior.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This is a sound environmental policy that needs widespread implementation. “Throwaway plastic products including cotton buds, cutlery and straws could be banned across much of Europe under a proposal put forward by the EU.”

Speaking of disposable products, this essay takes a look at some of the bizarre things that can be found on the world’s beaches.

Could renewable energy sources have helped Puerto Rico get their infrastructure whipped back into shape? Yes, but unfortunately, that’s not what happened. Here’s how and why.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Anxiety, phobias, and PTSD related to storms is a very real challenge for many people. Here’s an excellent source of information from the NWS Norman that I hope will be of help to anyone dealing with this very difficult situation. It reminds me of an essay I read in the mid 1980’s from StormTrack founder David Hoadley. To put it concisely, he said that storm chasers should, when within earshot of the general public, would be wise to temper their enthusiasm for severe weather or their “big catch” of their latest chase. Not everyone who is privy to your interest has a similar fascination with weather. For some, an encounter with a hurricane, flood, tornado, et al. has been a life altering experience.

This past 31 May 2018 marked the 5th anniversary of the El Reno tornado which was, in many ways, a tragic landmark event in USA weather history. Much could and should have been learned by the storm chasing community considering what transpired. But was a lasting lesson really learned? This though-provoking essay from the Capital Weather Gang has several viewpoints. From my own observations in the field, chasers are taking risks now more so than ever. With the irresistible appeal of adrenaline, social media fame, and opportunities to get footage on television, few that have pushed the limit and lived to tell the tale will back off in spite of the odds and risks involved. Unfortunately for some, a repeat of the El Reno tragedy is inevitable.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7d/El_Reno%2C_OK_EF-5_Tornado_2013-05-31.jpg

El Reno, Oklahoma tornado near peak intensity on 31 May 2018. Photo via Wikipedia & CC BY-SA 3.0

As for the 2018 tornado season across the USA, it’s been relatively tranquil…so far. Let’s hope this trend continues for the rest of the year.

Does climate change and/or global warming increase the intensity of tropical cyclones? This interesting read covers that topic. Often it matters what data set is used and how it is compiled.

Dr Marshall Shepherd takes a fascinating look at why hurricane outlook experts changed their forecasts about the 2018 activity.

While on the topic of hurricane activity, it’s not too late to prepare for the hurricane you hope you never have to experience. NOAA has an excellent site that will help you get ready.

The official death toll from Atlantic Hurricane Maria is 64. Truth be known, it’s probably in the thousands. Just as with Hurricane Katrina or the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the exact death toll may never be known. We must come to terms with the fact that, even though this is the 21st century, nature (and every possible way it impacts humans) will always have the upper hand.

NPR has broadcast special programming on the death toll in Puerto Rico that really brings to light the severity of the situation. Sadly, the fact that this story has been largely ignored by much of mainstream media in favor of trivial topics says much about how we are force-fed a diet of sophomoric “news” that’s designed to stir up hyperbole and histrionics.

This is a very telling article. The bottom line: Most Americans feel the federal government is doing much too little to address the challenges of climate change and the environment in general.

Summer heat has settled in with a vengeance across much of North America very early this year. Unfortunately, that also means that people will leave children, vulnerable adults, and pets in vehicles. That can prove deadly in short order. Heat safety should be practiced in temperatures as low as the mid 70’s regardless of where you live.

The latest US Drought Monitor is out. While some improvement has taken place, tens of millions of Americans still face drought conditions with little to no relief in sight.

Last but not least, these amazing GOES-17 weather satellite images are just the beginning of an exciting new era in forecasting and observing our incredible planet.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media and send a big “Thank You” to the folks who have followed me for years. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 21 – 28, 2018

Greetings to everyone! If you’re in the USA, I hope you get a chance to take a moment to remember those who, in serving our country, paid the ultimate sacrifice. We have a wild weather setup that’s ongoing as of this post for the Memorial Day holiday. Alberto, the first named tropical cyclone of the 2018 Atlantic season, is ready to make landfall on the Florida panhandle coast. We’ve also had catastrophic flash flooding in the Mid-Atlantic region, severe weather in the central plains with more forecast for today and tomorrow, an ongoing drought for much of the southwest, a heat wave that is bringing triple digit head indices as far north as Minnesota, and Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano is still in the news. And…this is only the end of May.

There’s plenty to review this week, so let’s get started.

Summer heat is making an early appearance across much of the contiguous USA. Sad to say that there have been fatalities due to people leaving children in cars during hot days. These deaths are totally preventable and should never happen. Heat stroke and heat fatalities can occur in temperatures as low as 80F.

Infographic courtesty NOAA

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project that’s part history, part climatology. “Citizen Scientists Are Unearthing Climate Data From Old Ships’ Logs.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Kilauea volcano in Hawaii has been expanding as of late. Along with that is a new hazard, a toxic gas called “laze.”

Speaking of Kilauea expanding, a third lava flow has reached the ocean. This Hawaiian volcano has been very active since 3 May 2018.

In spite of the fact that we don’t hear about volcanoes often, they’re actually quite common around the globe. Here’s an excellent essay on 7 facts about volcanoes you should know.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

While the focus of this article is on protecting yourself from ticks this summer (see the Summer Weather Safety section for more info), there’s definitely an environment/climate connection.

We all know that clean air is essential for good health. Truth be known, clean air is also good for the economy.

Many of us had an idea that this was true, but reading this article still knocks the wind out of me. “Humans Just 0.01% Of All Life But Have Destroyed 83% Of Wild Mammals.”

The sheer mass of plastic pollution in our oceans is mind-boggling. In some images, these pieces of our lives take on the appearance of sea life.

Here’s a collection of more startling images of plastic pollution and wildlife. The National Geographic cover certainly hits the bullseye on this very disturbing scenario.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

NOAA issued their outlook for the 2018 Atlantic hurricane seasonThere are other outlooks as well from a variety of sources. They don’t all agree and variable are unavoidable. The most important factor to remember is these are outlooks, not forecasts.

While on the topic of hurricanes, here’s a fascinating study on 34 years of tropical cyclone eye location and size and it’s connection to other characteristics of these amazing storms.

New research on the connection of climate change and hurricanes indicates that these devastating tropical cyclones will become more intense in a myriad of ways in the coming decades.

The latest US Drought Portal has been issued. More specifically, the Drought Monitor shows some relief in the contiguous USA, but there’s no hint at long-term relief in sight for the hardest hit areas.

As of this post, the tornado “season” across the USA has been relatively tranquil with only three intense tornadoes documented. Considering the alternative, no one is complaining. Here’s an excellent read on why this year has seen less tornado activity compared to other years.

Meanwhile in Sweden, a recent heat wave brought not a little discomfort. Temperatures to 30C (86F) are rare in this part of the world. Wish I could say the same for Oklahoma. Additionally, heatwaves in many northern countries are becoming more common at a disturbingly frequent rate.

SUMMER WEATHER SAFETY

With the Memorial Day holiday having taken place in the USA, the “unofficial” start to summer has arrived. All across the Northern Hemisphere, the days are getting longer…and the sun’s rays more intense. With that comes a variety of hazards and the links below cover heat safety and UV protection. As with all weather hazards, a few simple precautions can prevent a ton of trouble.

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

That’s a wrap for this post! For those of you who are new followers, I’d like to send a sincere “Thank You” and “Welcome” your way. I’m glad you’re along for the fun. For the folks who have been around a while, I’m glad you’ve stuck around for the fun. You know better than anyone that we can never tell what’s around the corner in this joint. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 30 – May 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active severe weather week across much of the USA. Oddly enough, Oklahoma went the entire month of April without a single tornado. That came to an end in the first week  of May when multiple rounds of severe weather added several tornadoes to the count. We’re also just weeks away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season (June 1st) and May 6 – 12, 2018 is National Hurricane Preparedness week. Even though the peak of hurricane activity isn’t for several months, now it the time to prepare. Check out the link below in Weather Safety for more comprehensive information from the National Weather Service. As usual, there’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen scientist is easy (no Ph.D required) and gives you an opportunity to contribute valuable data year round. Check out “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data for climate data banks and severe storm and radar research.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re not to enthralled about the recent happenings with Facebook, there are plenty of good alternatives.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been very active lately…and that has volcanologists very nervous.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC HEALTH

Ticks are always a hazard to humans with the ability to spread a myriad of life altering diseases. The USA’s Center For Disease Control (CDC) has expressed concern over the matter, but has been cautious in expressing a connection to climate change in this public health hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A recent dust storm in India killed over 100 people. There were many weather elements involved, including violent thunderstorms with damaging straight line winds.

Part 2 of this essay should be very telling and not a little interesting. “The 1970’s Global Cooling Zombie Myth And The Tricks Some People Used To Keep It Alive: Part 1.”

One of the biggest challenges for our society to comprehend current CO2 levels is because when they were at current levels in the past, humans didn’t exist.

Arctic sea ice is already at record low levels. A recent spike in winter temperatures has happened on consecutive years is making a bad situation even worse.

Climate change means big health issues for those with seasonal allergies. Growing seasons are getting longer and that means a longer pollen season.

Residents of California are getting use to a new weather and climate norm that’s not a little troubling. “Turbulent California faces a future of parched croplands and then flooded townships. Climate scientists call such things whiplash events.”

This past week marked the 19th anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas & Oklahoma tornado outbreak. It was the largest outbreak in the history of Oklahoma, had the 1st billion dollar tornado which was also the 1st time the NWS issued a Tornado Emergency, & had four OK tornadoes in progress simultaneously at the height of the event.

This is the wording used by the Norman, Oklahoma National Weather Service when they issued the first ever Tornado Emergency…the highest level of Tornado Warning that can be issued and is, according to the NWS, “An exceedingly rare tornado warning issued when there is a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage from an imminent or ongoing tornado. This tornado warning is reserved for situations when a reliable source confirms a tornado, or there is clear radar evidence of the existence of a damaging tornado, such as the observation of debris.”

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, has arrived.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Good infographics with severe weather safety information that’s specific to tornadoes.

Once you’re in a structure, there are specific places you need to go for the best protection

Infographics courtesy NOAA & NWS Norman, OK

National Hurricane Preparedness week runs from May 6 – 12, 2018. The National Weather Service has an excellent hurricane preparedness page that covers most everything you need to know. The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) also has a very informative page.

Remember, your mobile device can be your best friend in a weather emergency, whether it’s a tornado or a hurricane.

 

THE QUIXOTIC

This writer visited a Flat Earth Convention (yes, there is such a thing) and learned a great deal about not only the group in question, but insight into certain dimensions of human behavior.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a hearty thanks to my long time followers. It’s nice to have all of you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 23 – 30, 2018

Greetings everyone! If it’s spring in your location, I hope the weather is warming up nicely. For much of North America, the spring warmth got off to a slower than usual start, but that doesn’t mean that a cool summer is on tap. For my friends south of the equator, I hope your autumn is being good to you. Here in the USA, the typical severe weather “season” has been rather quiet, but that could change in a manner of days. At the bottom of this week’s post are several links regarding severe weather safety and a couple of infographics that I hope you’ll find helpful. There’s plenty of other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

With recent concerns over Facebook and privacy, others are looking at social media and websites in general for how they collect information on you. Here’s a good read on how to find out which apps have access to your Google information.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data year round.

Do the changing of the climate seasons seem off kilter to you? If so, you can help document changes in this impressive citizen science project…and anyone can help.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The best image of our galaxy to date has just been published and it’s truly spectacular.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Very small pieces of automobile tires and synthetic fabrics are making their way into our oceans in a microscopic form.

Many companies are pledging to cut plastic pollution. Quite a few are household names with international business. This is good and well, but if it’s only occurring in the UK and a handful of other countries, the benefits will be very, very limited.

Interesting development for the future of the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). “Pruitt Proposes New Rule Defining What Science Can Be Used By EPA.” Understandably so, scientific organizations are very concerned this will exclude valuable data from EPA’s rule-making process.

Here’s some very encouraging renewable energy news. Wind and solar accounted for more than 98 percent of all new USA electrical generation placed into service in the first two months of this year.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past April 24, 2018 was the 25th anniversary of the Tulsa/Catoosa, OK tornado. A pair of strong/violent tornadoes heavily damaged areas in the northeastern parts of the metro. Here’s a look back at the aftermath.

The world’s first trillion dollar natural disaster could happen in California in a wintertime mega-flood that would be the equivalent of eight Hurricane Katrinas. With climate change in the mix, the chances of it happening within a century have increased dramatically.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is far from totally inclusive of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity across North America arrives in May and lasts well into June…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Now for a few infographics. Here’s an important word on those “tornado sirens” that people put far too much importance on…

The bottom line: Sirens are an old school Cold War era technology that often malfunction for a myriad of reasons, can only warn people in very close proximity, and are at the whims of local emergency management. The National Weather Service has NO control over sirens. In the cacophony of a raging supercell thunderstorm that’s parked over your head, you’ll not hear a siren…so it would behoove you to get your potentially life-saving severe weather warning information from a reliable source.

If severe weather is forecast for your area, what do those “risk” categories mean? This infographic should clear up any questions you have. The Storm Prediction Center website is where you will find all of the details specific to your area.

Quite often, if you’re in a risk area (Slight, Enhanced, etc.) a Severe Thunderstorm Watch or Tornado Watch will be issued for your area. There are likely to be warnings as well. This infographic explains the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Lastly, remember to follow your local National Weather Service office and the broadcast meteorologists of your choice for local information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long-time followers. It’s great to have you all along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 9 – 16, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope that the weather is to your liking regardless of where you’re located. In recent days, the USA has taken quite a beating from blizzards, severe weather outbreaks, and devastating wildfires. Add to that an ongoing drought for the southwestern and southern plains states and it’s not been exactly a quiet spring. For this week’s post, I’ve included severe weather safety information which, to be really honest, is something that we should be aware of year round.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Searching publications is a routine part of scientific research…but there are barriers that are costly and waste time for many scientists.

Is science hitting a wall in recent years? Personally speaking, I’m quite optimistic about the future of science and feel that there’s no limit to the beneficial discoveries that are in the future of research.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Spring is arriving earlier and earlier in the USA’s National Parks…and climate change is to blame.

What happens in the Atlantic has a direct effect on the weather in much of North America. “In recent years sensors stationed across the North Atlantic have picked up a potentially concerning signal: The grand northward progression of water along North America that moves heat from the tropics toward the Arctic has been sluggish.”

Like or not, our best intentions to control nature often backfire in our faces. “Taming The Mighty Mississippi May Have Caused Bigger Floods.”

One of the serious downsides to plastics is the fact that it is now making its way back into the food chain. “Hidden Plastics: Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Dunk A Tea Bag.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This excellent infographic explains all the benefits of the National Weather Service’s Doppler radar. When you consider it’s capabilities, it’s no wonder that it has saved so many lives.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

The 10 April marked the 39 anniversary of the Red River Tornado Outbreak…one of the most substantial outbreaks of the 1970’s which included the Wichita Falls F-4 tornado.

The urban heat island effect is something that this urbanite is very familiar with. Summer night-time temperatures can run 10-15F higher than at rural locations 30-40 miles away. Here’s an interesting read on how some overheated cities are taking steps to curb those oppressively hot nights.

Here’s some very important information from the NOAA National Hurricane Center on new products and services for 2018. This is very important for folks living in hurricane prone regions since changes have occurred to information that is meant for the general public.

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, doesn’t arrive until next month…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Last but not least, an infographic covering the major severe weather hazards you may encounter. Keep in mind that some hazards, such as heavy rain and lightning, are clear and present dangers even in NON-SEVERE thunderstorms.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For April 2 – 9, 2018

Greetings to one and all! This week’s post will focus on severe weather safety. Considering the peak of North American severe weather activity is upon us, I wanted to share some links that I hope are helpful in you and your family/friends in establishing a good severe weather safety plan. For example, do you know the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning? You’d be surprised at how many people don’t…and furthermore take the issuance of a Tornado Watch for their location with a potentially dangerous carefree attitude. The infographic below explains the difference and is just the tip of the iceberg on the information in this post. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re interested in weather and citizen science, the two links below are the best way to get a good start. Whats more, you can do them year round and from anywhere across the USA and Canada.

CoCoRaHS: Community Collaborative Rainfall, Hail, & Snowfall Network. “Volunteers working together to measure precipitation across the nations.” A FREE app is available for iOS and Android.

mPING: “Weather radars cannot “see” at the ground, so mPING reports are used by the NOAA National Weather Service to fine-tune their forecasts. NSSL uses the data in a variety of ways, including to develop new radar and forecasting technologies and techniques.” The mPING app is FREE and available for both iOS and Android.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past week marked the 44th anniversary of the April 3-4, 1974 Superoutbreak of tornadoes. In several parameters, it will hold many records for many, many years in the breadth and scope of one of the USA’s most devastating weather events.

The Xenia, OH F-5 was one of the deadliest and most devastating tornadoes of the April, 1074 Superoutbreak.

This week also marks the 71st anniversary of the Woodward, OK tornado…the deadliest tornado in OK state history.

WEATHER SAFETY

The list below, while not exhaustive, has a good plethora of potentially life saving severe weather safety information.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos: Violent Windstorms Of The Prairie

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY INFOGRAPHICS

The following infographics are helpful in that they concisely explain much of the information you hear on your local weather forecasts. Others simply give good ideas on how to get severe weather information and other important safety information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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