Tag Archives: climate

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 30 – August 6, 2018

Greetings everyone! To say that the past week has been uneventful is a vast understatement. The wildfires raging across several areas of North America have been the main headlines, but several areas in the Northern Hemisphere have been dealing with a searing heat wave that’s breaking many records. This week’s post has many summer heat safety links that are very informative. Lastly, with the arrival of August, the potential for Atlantic tropical cyclone activity ramps up. While the Atlantic basin is quiet, now is the time to prepare…and this week’s post also includes many links on hurricane preparedness.

Here’s a look at a selection of this week’s top links.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

The CoCoRaHS project is a great way to combine citizen science with an interest in weather. Check out the CoCoRaHS website to find out how you can participate!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The ongoing wildfires in California, USA have become deadly and out-of-control in historic proportions.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For the tens of millions of people across the USA who work outside, a warming planet and heatwaves are a constant hazard…and it’s only going to get worse. Not only will health and productivity suffer, but there are economic ramifications as well.

This is a very refreshing change of pace concerning the challenges we face with climate change. “An Optimist’s Guide To Solving Climate Change And Saving The World.”

Air quality is more than the smog of days gone by. It’s a very dangerous weather condition that still affects many cities across the world. Here’s a comprehensive guide to air quality that covers many topics including wildfire smoke and ozone.

While on the topic of air quality, a disturbing trend has been happening as of late. CFC’s, the very harmful chemicals that wrecked havoc on the earth’s ozone layer and were banned in the 1980’s are making a mysterious comeback.

How many people did Hurricane Maria kill in Puerto Rico? As is often the case with major hurricanes that strike heavily populated areas, the exact death toll may never be known.

Here’s an interesting review of a report overseen by NOAA and the American Meteorological Society. 2017 was the warmest year without an El Niño recorded on Earth.

You can read the official NOAA State Of The Climate report with links to further information here.

https://www.climate.gov/sites/default/files/SotC2017_08_VeryWarmDays_combo_large.png

Last but not least, here’s an overview from NOAA of global surface temperatures that compares 2017 to the 1981-2010 data.

https://www.climate.gov/sites/default/files/SotC2017_01_GlobalSurfaceTemps_combo_large.jpg

SUMMER SAFETY

For folks in the Northern Hemisphere, summer is still going full force. Many areas, including parts of Scandinavia, are dealing with record-breaking heat. Regardless of where you live, summer heat and UV rays are something you need to be aware of. Here are some summer safety links with information on everything from avoiding heat illnesses to UV and sun protection. Keep your NOAA weather radio in good working order too. It’s a great way to get your local forecasts and any related information regarding hot temperatures and the heat index.

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

National Weather Service Printable Heat Index Chart

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

With the arrival of August, the chances of activity in the Atlantic basin increases dramatically. Here are a few hurricane preparedness links to help you get started in preparing for the storm you hope never happens.

FEMA Ready.gov Hurricane Preparedness

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Review For July 23 – 30, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an interesting time for many areas in the Northern Hemisphere…and not in a good way. From heatwaves to wildfires to flooding…many areas are dealing with conditions rarely or never experienced before. Let’s get started on this week’s links.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very good example of how tracking posts on Twitter by citizen scientists and other concerned citizens are helping forecasters keep track of the smoky skies that result from the numerous USA wildfires.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Synthetic textiles have been a major advancement in the apparel industry. The problem is the minute microfibers that make their way from our clothing into rivers, streams, oceans, and even the air we breathe.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This is the latest three-month temperature outlook from NOAA for the period of August through October 2018. For the most part, all of the contiguous USA (save for part of the northern plains) is likely to be above average in temperatures.

Three-month Temperature Outlook current snapshot

Image courtesy NOAA

Here’s a fantastic cloud chart from NOAA & NASA in a printable, two page PDF format. Knowing your clouds is an essential part of understanding how our incredible planet works.

If anyone knows about the importance of climate change and maintaining military security and readiness, it’s the USA’s armed forces. For all branches, climate change is a clear and present danger.

In recent days, stark images have come from around the world of everything from wildfires, heat waves, and flooding. They’re all signs of climate change in progress.

The Carr Fire in California is just one of many devastating wildfires across North America…drought, dry vegetation, and a warming climate all play a part.

Here’s another look at a summer that has been anything but tranquil, especially for the Northern Hemisphere.

This summer has been a scorcher for the UK with temperatures in the mid 90’s F reported at London’s Heathrow Airport. Is this the new normal? By all indications, the answer is, “Yes.”

A massive amount of dust from Africa is helping to keep some storms in Texas from forming…and keeping the Atlantic tropical cyclone formation in check.

dust map

Image courtesy NASA Earth Observatory

An excellent climate read. “Droughts, Heatwaves, And Floods: How To Tell When Climate Change Is To Blame.” In the future, atmospheric scientists can better assess climate change’s influence on many extreme climate and weather events.

Graphic via Nature News

Here’s a very thought provoking read that’s worth going over several times. “We Should Never Have Called It Earth.”

Last but not least, a look at climate change coverage and for-profit media. Is that topic a “ratings killer?”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media and a “thank you” for my long-term followers. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. There are a few changes that this blog will be going through over the months to come…I think you’ll enjoy them!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For July 9 – 16, 2018

Greetings everyone! For folks in the Northern Hemisphere, I hope you’re keeping your cool. Yes, many areas  are in the climatological peak of summer heating, but there are also a number of areas experiencing unusual summer heat. Regardless, take it easy out there. As usual, plenty of topics to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This is one of the most liberating experiences I’ve had in some time. “On The 10th Anniversary Of The App Store, it’s time to delete most of your apps.”

Online harassment is an almost unavoidable feature of the online world. As of late, it has taken on particularly vitriolic proportions. “Roughly four-in-ten Americans have personally experienced online harassment, and 62% consider it a major problem.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A good read on how public/personal health and air quality issues turned to citizen science for data collection.

Coming in contact with ticks is no fun…but some intrepid folks have done just that for scientists to study the ticks that bit them and whether or not they carried life altering viruses.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Getting people to the point where they realize they’re buying a product & also borrowing the packaging. “Can Norway help us solve the plastic crisis, one bottle at a time?”

What was once thought to be pristine areas within Antarctic fjords have been found to contain levels of microplastics that rival urban areas.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A look back at June 2018 from NOAA. “The June contiguous U.S. temperature was 71.5°F, 3.0°F above the 20th century average. Only June 1933 and 2016 were warmer for the nation.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA

As of 9 July 2018, there have been six weather and climate disaster events in the USA with losses exceeding $1 billion dollars.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

A story like this says as much about human behavior and the general public’s attitude toward scientific evidence as it does the ongoing heat wave and climate change.

Speaking of human behavior and science, people’s social network can have a significant effect on their behavior when faced with a natural disaster.

This is a fascinating and very detailed read on the importance of ocean temperatures, why they’re studied, and their importance to climate change.

As sea levels rise, much of our infrastructure, including the power stations and cables that control the internet we all use, are in a state of peril…and disruption.

An excellent essay from Dr. Marshall Shepherd on preventing weather related fatalities at outdoor sporting and concert events.

Forecasting the intensity of tropical cyclones is one of the most daunting forecasting challenges a meteorologist can face.

From the Climate Prediction Center, the latest technical El Nino diagnostic discussion.

Just for reference, here is a map of the contiguous USA and the warmest day of the year based on climate data going back to 1981.

Map courtesty NOAA

THE QUIXOTIC

Last but not least, I’ll let this article speak for itself. “That Self-Styled “Very Stable Genius” Is A Danger To Stability.”

FYI: If you see any ads on this blog, they are from WordPress and not me. I apologize for any inconvenience they may cause.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new social media followers and a big “Thank You” to everyone…I appreciate all of you!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For June 11 – 18, 2018

Greetings everyone! El Nino and other climate topics have been given a good deal of discussion lately and we’ve got some links covering those topics. The latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA is out…and I’ll let the data speak for itself. With the ongoing heat wave across much of North America, I’ve included some summer heat safety info along with hurricane preparedness links. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Few things would benefit our students more than a familiarity with the scientific method and critical thinking…regardless of what field they’re studying. “We Should Teach All Students, In Every Discipline, To Think Like Scientists.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This will have an effect on our weather and climate patterns for some time to come. “The June ENSO forecast estimates a 50% chance of El Niño developing during the late summer or early autumn, and an approximately 65% chance of El Niño conditions in the winter, so forecasters have instituted an El Niño Watch.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out and includes a look at significant global climate events for May 2018.

This is unprecedented warmth…and it’s only a small piece of a much larger warming puzzle that’s rapidly falling into place. “The U.S. Just Observed Its Warmest 3-, 4-, And 5-Year Spans On Record.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

Here’s a good listen about a very unique way of “listening” for tornadoes. If this works out, perhaps this will become part of the warning process of the future.

This is a “spot on” essay on why it’s not productive…or worth your time…to debate science that already has sound evidence to establish its facts.

This week, I’m continuing to pass on weather safety information. With the current heat wave across much of North America, summer heat safety is of utmost importance. It’ll get hotter into July and August…so keep this information handy.

WEATHER SAFETY: SUMMER HEAT

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

The Atlantic is quiet for now, but this is the perfect time to prepare for tropical cyclones. Waiting until everyone is in panic mode is the worst way possible to handle a potentially life threatening situation. It’s also important to keep in mind that most deaths from tropical cyclones comes from flooding…not wind.

WEATHER SAFETY: HURRICANES/TROPICAL CYCLONES

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post! I hope all of you are having a great summer…or winter…depending on which hemisphere you live in. A big “Thank You” to all my followers in all my social media outlets. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 6 – 13, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I’m glad you stopped by and hope the weather is to your liking whether it’s autumn or spring in your location. As of this post, much of North America is relatively quiet with autumn settling in nicely across most of the continent. Fortunately, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is winding down quickly…and after such a destructive year, that’s very good. Let’s get started on this week’s selection.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

No, this isn’t “new” news. Yes, we’ve been dealing with it since 2016. But is it any wonder that Instagram and Twitter, having become a morass of shills, hucksters, and “beautiful people” have become very clique-oriented and useless to the average user? This paragraph says it all…

“Remixing the feed will make Instagram less useful as a real-time content feed because the most recent posts won’t necessarily be at the top. Users will have to worry about making their posts good enough to be chosen by the algorithm or their posts could be de-prioritized. And brands might lose the reach of a previously reliable marketing channel, the same way they did with Facebook Pages.” – TechCrunch

All hail the mighty algorithm. If, like me, you wish you understand and then disable the algorithm, you may have to research each individual social media entity (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et al.) since there’s no “one size fits all” solution to this challenge.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Your smart phone is the only tool you’ll need to help this awesome citizen science project that tracks mosquitoes.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Studying an active volcano is obviously dangerous. Fortunately, this is where a drone can “step” in and help.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The pollution released by recent wildfires across the USA is making Americans sick and undermining decades of progress in cleaning the air.

Trees are good for the environment in so many different ways…and helping to clean the air we breathe is only one.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a look at October 2017 in the USA. “October’s nationally averaged temperature was 55.7 degrees F, 1.6 degrees above average, which placed it among the warmest third of the historical record.”

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Unfortunately, recent data shows that carbon emissions worldwide are still on the rise.

In spite of the frequent dour news we hear regarding climate change, there are some bright lights that are worth looking at.

Long-term forecasts such as this are a bit risky, but interesting nonetheless. “Sweden’s Big Cities Predicted To Have Coldest Winter In Five Years.”

PUBLIC POLICY

In spite of “official” stances…”US states, cities and businesses signed up to ‘America’s pledge’ to combat global warming have a combined economic power equal to the world’s third-biggest economy.”

No further comment needed on this. “The Senate Just Approved Trump’s Pic For NASA Chief. You Can Probably Guess What He Thinks About Climate Change.”

The “pushback” from climate change denialists is getting more desperate by the day.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. You’ll find links to all our social media below…our Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram are the most active accounts. We’d be glad to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For June 12 – 19, 2017

Greetings to all! There’s plenty of topics to go over this week and with all eyes on the Atlantic/Caribbean region, much of the focus is on early season tropical activity. With that in mind, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some really great news on the renewables front! Wind and solar power met over ten percent of USA’s March 2017 electric power demand.

Meanwhile in Germany, they’ve broken their own renewable energy record by getting eighty-five percent of its energy needs from renewable sources in April 2017.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With the current tropical activity in the Atlantic hurricane basin, here’s the comprehensive National Hurricane Center’s Hurricane Safety Homepage. Regardless of what this year’s season brings to North America, even a tropical storm can have devastating effects. Remember, it only takes one storm to make a major disaster.

Here’s a look at the summer outlook from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center for the period of July through September. First, let’s look at temperature which shows above average for most of the contiguous USA and Alaska.

Here’s a look at the Climate Prediction Center’s outlook for precipitation for the same time period. Only small parts of the contiguous USA and western Alaska are indicated to have slightly above average precipitation.

It’s important to keep in mind that these are outlooks and not forecasts and are based on different data sets, statistics, and other information than forecasts.

According to recently released NASA data, May 2017 was the second-warmest May on record. It’s yet another data set and reminder of the continuing climate change trend that’s occurring globally.

Considering the location, height above sea level, climate change, and vulnerability to tropical cyclones, Houston area residents are understandably concerned over catastrophic flooding.

This past summer in Antarctica had widespread ice melt. El Nino did play one major part.

Speaking of Antarctica, a large portion of an ice shelf in Antarctica will break off and collapse into the ocean. The ramifications can extend to global effects.

Here are some very good graphics from Climate Central explaining how small changes in climactic averages add up to big changes in climate and weather extremes.

Understanding the complexities of climate science required paying very close attention to details even if they seem unrelated.

Fascinating and thought provoking read. “New Research May Resolve A Climate ‘Conundrum’ Across The History Of Human Civilization.”

Taking a look back to get a good perspective on future climate. “Revisiting A Climate Data Viz Icon.”

Climate science denialists are quite the piece of work. “Editor Of New ‘Sham Journal’ Is Climate Science Denier With Ties To Heartland Institute.”

Here’s a new term for your atmospheric science glossary: Ice Lollies.

PUBLIC POLICY

Should we be surprised by this? No. “The Energy Department is closing an office that works with other countries to develop clean energy technology, another sign of the Trump administration’s retreat on climate-related activities after its withdrawal from the Paris agreement this month.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media and let you know that I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 5 – 12, 2017

Greetings to one and all! For those of us in North American, summer is in full swing with sizzling temperatures expected for the next several days. Summer heat is a highly underrated weather hazard and I’ve got some outstanding information from the National Weather Service in this week’s post. As for severe weather, it’s going to be a very quiet period for much of the Great Plains the next few days. Overall, May 2017 was quieter than usual across the contiguous USA with the number of tornadoes, high wind, and hail reports being below normal. And, of course, the big news of the past few days has been the USA’s decision to discontinue commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement. Fortunately, at the state and local level, there’s a groundswell gathering momentum that will hold to the commitment and do the right thing. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s begin.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re looking for a way to help out weather research with crowdsourcing citizen science, the mPING project is for you. The free app is easy to use and you can send reports year round for a variety of weather conditions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

We’ve just observed World Oceans Day. Considering that approximately 75% of the surface of the earth is covered by water, it behooves us all to have a thorough understanding of how our oceans work and how important they are to our forms of life.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a look back at severe weather activity in the USA for May, 2017. Of note are two events recorded in Oklahoma…a 104mph non-tornadic gust reported at the Walters, OK Oklahoma Mesonet station and a 4.25″ hailstone that was documented in Okfuskee County, OK. The number of tornadoes nationwide was 290…only slightly higher than the statistical average of 276. Overall, it was a below normal month in severe weather activity.

Infographic courtesty NOAA Storm Prediction Center

This week marks the anniversary of the June 8, 1974 Great Plains tornado outbreak. While not one of the larger outbreaks of recent years, long-time residents remember this event well. The Tulsa, OK metro was hit by three tornadoes with up to EF-3 damage in some areas. The deadliest tornado was the Drumright, OK EF-4 which killed fourteen people along a thirty mile long path. Here’s a overview of the events across several great plains states.

This is also the anniversary of the Barneveld, Wisconsin EF-5 tornado. The Milwaukee, WI National Weather Service has a comprehensive overview.

Here’s a look at the dangers of sea level rise in the USA according to new data from NOAA.

Many American residents who don’t have a good understanding of hour weather and climate work are prime targets for climate change denialists who prey on their lack of earth science knowledge.

While on the topic of the American public, Dr. Marshall Shepherd has written and excellent essay on fifteen suggestions for broadcast meteorologists on conveying weather information to their viewers.

Flooding in the USA kills more people annually than tornadoes, lightning, high winds, and hurricanes combined. It would behoove those of us in America to take the threat of climate change induced flooding very, very seriously.

Summer heat is settling in across much of North America. By observing heat safety tips, heat illnesses and deaths can be prevented.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

PUBLIC POLICY

One of the most thought-provoking articles I’ve read as of late. The subtitle says it all and it right on the mark. “For too long, liberals have been treating climate change as a third or fourth tier issue. As the US exits the Paris Climate Accord, it’s time for liberals to re-evaluate an issue that subsumes all others.”

In some form of media, climate change denial, both scientific and political, is nurtured in a variety of ways. Most of it goes unchallenged. It’s time to change that and call the denialists out. This will also require some introspection on the part of those of us who accept the overwhelming evidence of climate change science.

A disturbingly unsettling read on six ways budget cuts will hamper NOAA’s weather forecasting capabilities. Yes, this will affect you in more ways than you can imagine.

As of this post, thirteen states in the USA are continuing on with their commitment to the Paris Agreement. Let’s hope that in short order many other states join their ranks.

While on the topic of dedication to commitment, here’s another good read from Climate Central on how the USA can hold to its promise for the Paris Agreement.

Asking public officials if they “believe” in climate change is the wrong way to attempt an initiation of a productive dialogue.

Last but not least, is there a way that individual Americans can still follow the Paris Climate Agreement? Absolutely. Here’s how.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

————————————————————————————-

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For May 1 – 8. 2017 #HurricaneStrong

Hurricane Preparedness Week #HurricaneStrong has started for the USA. This week’s focus will be on preparing for these powerful storms. If you live in a hurricane prone region, now is the time to prepare. There are numerous websites from the National Weather Service, the American Red Cross, and FEMA that have helpful information.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

With the current USA’s Environmental Protection Agency now out of the climate science business, here are some good resources to keep yourself informed.

Here’s some very good renewables news. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), a new wind turbine was installed every two and a half hours in the United States during the first quarter of 2017.

Arbor Day may only officially be celebrated once a year, but in reality every day can be arbor day.

In spite of improvements in many countries, air pollution still is a substantial public health issue round the world with developing countries having the most troubles.

The contentious atmosphere (no pun intended) surrounding the current presidential administration, the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues with nefarious overtones.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

It’s Hurricane Preparedness Week in the USA from May 7 – 13, 2017. Now is the time to get prepared if you live in a hurricane prone region. The National Weather Service has a comprehensive hurricane preparedness website with all the information you need. On Twitter, you can also follow @NWS along the #hurricanePrep #HurricaneStrong & #ItOnlyTakesOne hashtags for more information.

Here’s a very nice infographic from the National Weather Service with a plethora of information on the WSR-88D weather radars that are an invaluable part of the forecasting and warning process.

NOAA has a very useful tool you can use to find out how climate change will affect your neighborhood.

Taking into consideration the recent changes in the Antarctic ice shelves, a major break could be imminent.

A slower rise in global temperatures from 1998 to 2012 has been hailed by climate change denialists as proof that Earth’s climate isn’t changing and future projections are irrelevant. In fact, new data show that the “hiatus” has no impact on long-term climate change projections.

Big changes in the broadcast meteorology field with the minority finally becoming the majority. Broadcast meteorologists are coming to the inevitable conclusion that they’re not only the only scientists their viewers will ever see on television, but that climate change is now a part of the essential information they must convey to their viewers.

The recent drought in California may be linked to a newly identified climate pattern.

This past week marked the eighteen anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas and Oklahoma tornado outbreak, the largest outbreak to date in the history of Oklahoma. The National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, OK has a comprehensive retrospective with a wealth of information. And yes, it can and will happen again.

This past week also marked the tenth anniversary of the Greensburg, KS EF-5 tornado. Thanks to fast and effective warnings from the Dodge City, KS National Weather Service and good coverage by broadcast meteorologists, many people had plenty of warning. A few decades ago, a tornado of this magnitude would have resulted in dozens of fatalities.

We’ve not heard the last of this for a long, long time. “New York Times Wants To Offer Diverse Opinions. But On Climate, Facts Are Facts.”

Finally, some helpful lightning safety information courtesy the National Weather Service office in Burlington, VT. Every year approximately thirty people are killed and hundreds injured in the USA alone from lightning. Most if not all of these deaths and injuries are avoidable.

That’s a wrap for this post…see you next time!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 8 – 16, 2017

Greeting’s to everyone! If you’re celebrating the holiday weekend, I hope it’s a good one. For those not celebrating, I hope your spring/autumn is going as well as possible. Here in the USA, the severe weather season is in full swing this week with several days of challenging forecasts. Also, don’t forget the March For Science is coming up on 22 April 2017! This week’s post will be a bit on the brief side due to a developing severe weather setup…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A disconcerting privacy read. In the process of trying to guard privacy rights, some people are trying to “trash their tracks.” Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. Polluting your web history won’t keep you from having your rights violated by nefarious opportunists.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a good read on spring-time citizen science projects from SciStarter! Why sit on the sidelines when you can take part? Citizen scientists add valuable data to research projects that, in most situations, would be difficult to obtain.

Citizen science and weather go hand-in-hand exceptionally well! Here are four ways you can enjoy citizen science get involved and contribute valuable weather and climate data to data bases and research!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It seems as if wind energy gets less expensive month by month…and that’s some very good news!

The drought in California may by “officially” over, but it’s best to not think it won’t happen again.

Speaking of California, here’s some very good renewables news. On one day in March, 2017, California got fifty percent of it’s electricity from solar power.

NASA has a new Night Light Map that shows patterns of human settlement across our humble home.

Challenging times ahead for the EPA. With air quality in the USA still problematic, the health of millions is at stake.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If this past winter seemed short for much of North America, you weren’t imagining things. For the southwestern USA states in particular, spring is coming earlier every year.

This is the kind of record breaking data that doesn’t bring about smiles. We’ve yet another record breaking month for low Arctic sea ice.

Here’s a very informative Science Friday interview with climate scientist Michael Mann on his recent House Committee on Science, Space, & Technology hearing testimony.

Time is running short. “We Must Reach Peak Carbon Emissions By 2020, Says Former UN Climate Chief.

Weather balloons carry instrument packages that supply invaluable data for forecasting and observations. Check out this video of a weather balloon exploding at 100,000 feet!

The Heartland Institute is at it again…this time will a well oiled PR campaign based on unfounded accusations sans evidence.

PUBLIC POLICY

NASA continues to be the target of budget cuts that, in the long run, will mean the demise of valuable data that benefits us all.

Now that former Oklahoma AG Scott Pruitt is running the USA’s EPA, some climate change denialists are bemoaning that, “he won’t fight.”

While on that topic, the train wreck continues. “Scott Pruitt Calls For An ‘Exit’ From The Paris Accord, Sharpening The Trump White House’s Climate Rift.”

Last but definitely not least, don’t forget the March For Science is only days away on 22 April 2017! Currently, there are over 500 satellite marches that will be taking place the world over!

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…glad you’re along for the fun! Interesting times ahead.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 1 – 8, 2017

Greetings everyone! It’s been a busy week for severe weather events across the contiguous USA the past few days. One of those days included a rare High Risk in the southeastern states. Perhaps more unusual is the fact that it was the third High Risk for 2017…and we’re still in early April. There’s a great deal of uncertainty as to whether the rest of the “tornado season” will be active. The best action for the general public to take is the necessary preparedness steps. This week’s post will be a bit shorter than usual due to ongoing projects and the severe weather of the past week…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A good climate read on the irrevocable link between climate change and its effects on living animals and other parts of the earth’s biosphere.

In spite of its numerous benefits, renewable energy sources are still subject for debate. Here’s a very concise overview over many very contentious renewables topics.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With the severe weather season in full swing, I’ve compiled a list of safety links that I hope will be helpful to you. Remember, the severe weather season is (from a climatological perspective) just kicking into gear and we have several active months ahead.

If you’re programming your NOAA weather radio, here’s a helpful page with an interactive map that will help you with any coverage questions.

This video is proof positive that a vehicle is no match for even a weak and quite modest tornado.

This past April 3rd was the forty-third anniversary of the tornado “Super-outbreak” of 1974. Here’s a very nice retrospective and even a look at if it were to happen again today, how the amount of damage and potential casualties would be much greater. As we saw with the 27 April 2011 outbreak, events of this magnitude can and will happen again.

From Climate Central, “A never-ending stream of carbon pollution ensures that each year the world continues to break records for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.” Unfortunately, 2017 will be no different.

With largely ice-free summers since 2011, the Arctic Ocean is taking on characteristics of the Atlantic Ocean.

PUBLIC POLICY

The campaign to put science and tech leaders in public office is gathering momentum fast…and can’t happen soon enough. In fact, it’s time for scientists to step up with no time to waste.

This short video explains why scientists are mobilizing and taking a stance against the “fear of facts” that is pervasive within the current USA’s presidential administration.

It should come as no surprise that scientists have understood for over a century the way our climate functions…better than the current head of the USA’s EPA.

The role of scientists is to present facts, the future possibilities, and consequences. Unfortunately, the people (often our politicians/lawmakers) are so scientifically illiterate that they can do little more than convey ignorance and make egregiously misguided decisions.

Last but not least, a cartoon that has a bite of truth mixed with humor.

And that’s a wrap for this post! Remember, if you live in an area that is prone to severe weather, make final preparations for your emergency kits and any other necessary arrangements. Until next time…Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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