Tag Archives: cloud

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For May 2 – 9, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope your week is going well. As is the case so often for this time of year, this post will be more brief than usual due to several days of ongoing severe weather across North America. Monday’s (9 May 2016) tornadoes were not without a significant amount of damage and, unfortunately, two fatalities. Severe weather is ongoing across the Ohio valley and in Texas. Another round is on tap for Wednesday, 11 May 2016. Still, there’s plenty of other interesting news going on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Considering the sub-par coverage of science topics by the mainstream media, a fact-checking crusade initiated by scientists might not be a bad idea.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

People are still freaking out about the planet Mercury in “retrograde.”  Here’s what’s really going on.

A spectacular look at the 12 “craziest” images ever captured by the Hubble Telescope.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

An interesting new study examines wildfires in California and found that human activity explains as much about their frequency and location as climate influences.

A new map from Climate Central backed by data from NOAA shows the United States has more gas flares than any other country in the world.

Here’s some very good news on the renewable energy front. Solar power is catching on exceptionally fast in the Untied States.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating read (with plenty of links for further research) on rain spawning more rain when it falls on ploughed land.

A very interesting read for my fellow weather geeks. “New Maps Shed Light On The Secret Lives Of Clouds.”

A novel concept…with journal link for further reading. “While hurricanes are a constant source of worry for residents of the southeastern United States, new research suggests that they have a major upside — counteracting global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 21 – 28, 2016

Greetings and welcome to all. I hope everybody’s having a great week and ready for April to take front and center. Hard to imagine that three months of 2016 have already passed. As the saying goes, time flies when you’re having fun…so make 2016 your year for personal growth…and make sure to nurture the kind of things in your life that money can’t buy. Those are truly the most valuable. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Can science fair participation bring about future educational and career success? Absolutely!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An ugly scenario. “A Nightmarish Timeline Of What Would Happen To The Earth After A Massive Solar Flare.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

How much energy could the USA get from solar? Far more than we are now…and now it the time to go full throttle.

Based on Met Office data, the UK’s plant growing season is a month longer than it was in 1990.

While we’re in the UK, its beaches have seen a dramatic (and unfortunate) rise in the amount of beach litter…most of which could be easily recycled.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With adaptation being the key to survival, California is finding ways to take the lead in fighting climate change.

A very thought-provoking read on proposals that are aimed at dealing with climate change.

With mounting evidence increasing by the day, meteorologists are now overwhelmingly concluding that climate change in indeed real and caused by humans.

Interesting read on cloud droplet research and its potential to influence climate models.

This is a great idea and badly needed to prevent unnecessary and completely preventable deaths from heat exposure that occur every year.

That’s a wrap for this post!

I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

_____________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Jan. 4 – 12, 2016

If the December, 2015 holiday season seemed tepid in the Northern Hemisphere, you weren’t imagining things. It was an unusually warm December across much of North America with heavy rains and even deadly tornadoes making their appearance late in the month. But, the USA wasn’t the only area effected by significant weather events as 2015 drew to a close. Many parts of the UK were dealt a hefty blow by devastating floods. On the brighter side, with COP21 having wrapped up, the countries of our humble home now have a template to go by in regards to climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Astronomy fans will love this amazing image of the universe that captures its often difficult to comprehend immensity.

For those with big egos and/or think that our human populated Earth is the center of mythological monotheism, here are seven incredible facts about our universe that are worth serious consideration.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE/

Was the Christian Science Monitor trying for an interesting headline or are they seriously doubting overwhelming scientific evidence?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Check out these amazing satellite imagery of our humble home during December, 2015.

The 2015 USA wildfire season set a very ominous record.

This horrible mess on a beach in England has to be seen to be believed.

Recycling is always the way to go, but there can be challenging tasks that go with it.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A spot on read that calls the bluff of many an attention hungry “mediarologists. “Don’t Trust An Internet Snowstorm Forecast More Than A Week Into The Future.”

The climate and biosphere of Antarctica aren’t easy to study. Here’s an interesting read on the mystery of Antarctica’s clouds.

Clouds play a bigger role in the melting of the Greenland ice sheet than was previously assumed.

While on the subject of ice, giant icebergs have shown to be effective at removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

If December, 2015 seemed unusually warm for many of you in the USA, you weren’t imagining things.

According to Met Office data, December, 2015 was the wettest month on record for the UK.

The current El Nino may have peaked in some respects, but it’s far from over.

In spite of conclusive and overwhelming evidence, the climate change denial machine ticks on. “The conservative thinktanks under the microscope are the main cog in the machinery of climate science denial across the globe, pushing a constant stream of material into the public domain.”

THE QUIXOTIC

Sound scientific evidence be damned! When a nefarious opportunist has enough money and clout to throw their weight around, they can afford to say, “The laws of the land don’t apply to me.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For September 30 – October 7, 2015

Two big stories have dominated the North American weather news this week. The first event is Hurricane Joaquin which, as of this post, is still an ongoing event. Joaquin peaked in intensity on 3 October 2015 when it briefly reached maximum sustained winds just under the Category 5 threshold making it the most intense tropical cyclone of the Atlantic 2015 season to date. The other big story, which could have been made worse if Joaquin had made landfall on the eastern USA coast, is the historic flooding in North and South Carolina. The Charleston, South Carolina region was hit particularly hard. While flooding often doesn’t appear as “devastating” as substantial wind damage, it can be just as (if not more) deadly and force residents into years of recovery and rebuilding. One only has to look at areas of New Orleans, Louisiana to see this. Some areas of the “Big Easy” have yet to recover a full decade after Katrina slammed ashore in 2005. The deadliest natural disaster in the history of Tulsa, Oklahoma is not a tornado, but the Memorial Day flash flooding event of May, 1984 in which 14 fatalities occurred. Flooding kills more people every year than all other weather related phenomenon combined. Unfortunately, its dangers are highly underrated by much of the general public until they meet it head on. Only then does the stark realization occur that floods can be just as devastating to life and property as a major hurricane or violent tornado. On the brighter side, this week is the National Weather Service’s “Did You Know” week which is going on to help inform the general public about the many facets and benefits the NWS provides to our quality of life. You’ll likely see many posts on Twitter from your local NWS office with the hashtag #NWSDYK.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

An excellent essay on the benefits of citizen science. “Science Of The People, By The People, And For The People.”

A reminder to download the free mPING weather app you can use year round regardless of where you live and contribute to weather research. “The NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory is collecting public weather reports through a free app available for smart phones or mobile devices. The app is called “mPING,” for Meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground.” This app also has a very, very small “footprint” so it won’t be gobbling up a ton of space on your smart phone.

If you’re into citizen science and astronomy, you need to check out this new collaboration.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

New high-resolution photos of Pluto’s moon Charon show that it’s so ugly, it’s positively beautiful.

NASA has just released over 8,400 Apollo moon mission photos online…and they are spectacular.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

Perhaps the most cynical and imprimatur hyperbole on recycling I’ve ever read. “The Reign of Recycling.” When short-term profits supersede long-term environmental benefits, we’ve made no progress…and the author and New York Times have no problem with condoning such irresponsibility. Fortunately here’s a spot-on rebuttal that slays the arguments put forth in the NYT article.

Robots could (and should) make sorting recycling materials safer.

Indoor air quality is just as important as the air we breathe outside. Here’s some handy tips on how to improve indoor air quality on a budget.

The USA is gaining ground in the use of renewable energy but in some respects, has a great deal of catching up to do.

There’s a surprisingly cold “blob” of water in the north Atlantic. What’s causing that?

It happened once, it  can happen again. “Scientists say an ancient mega-tsunami hurled boulders nearly as high as the Eiffel Tower.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’ve not checked out the National Weather Service’s Enhanced Data Display, you should take a peek. It’s a fantastic source of weather information for the general public, pilots, emergency managers, and more.

NOAA’s Environmental Visualization Laboratory has a very cool way to view weather conditions worldwide in an interactive site that’s well worth checking out.

This article, written early in the life cycle of Hurricane Joaquin, poignantly expresses the frustrating forecasting scenarios that so often plague meteorologists.

During Hurricane Joaquin’s early stages, the European forecast model was more accurate at one stage than the American model. What does that mean for weather forecasting?

What caused the recent record-setting rainfall in South Carolina? Here’s a nice overview that explains everything you need to know.

My fellow weather geeks will enjoy this NPR story. “What’s At The Edge Of A Cloud?”

Fortunately, there’s a reason or two for feeling optimistic about the upcoming Paris climate change summit.

While some recent documented gains in Antarctic ice may offset losses, there’s no reason to celebrate. The deniers will likely jump on this story, but their own workplace climate is changing.

There’s no “grey’s” or uncertainties about this. “No Doubt About it: People Who Mislead The Public About Climate Change Are Deniers.”

Speaking of melting ice and glaciers, the Mont Blanc glacier in the French alps isn’t what it used to be and is France’s most visible symbol of climate change.

The high price of reckless disregard for solid climate science. “The Cost Of Doing Nothing Hit $400 Trillion.”

THE QUIXOTIC

When public servants run out of constructive projects to benefit society and the quality of life, they do what they do best…especially if they’re threatened by science. Start a witch-hunt.

That’s a wrap for this post!

A quick “Thank You” and “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. It’s nice to have you here. I’m in this for the long haul, so the fun is just getting started.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Instagram

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

 

 

 

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Feb. 16 – 23, 2015

As of this post, several southern states in the USA have been given a stout taste of winter with all the frozen precipitation trimmings. Many folks, especially those living in the northeast, can’t wait for a taste of spring. Personally speaking, I’m relishing every minute of winter I can get. Soon enough, the brutal great plains summer heat will set in and we’ll be begging for a shot of cool air. As for the inevitable changes that occur and induce an increase in severe thunderstorm activity, they will be here soon enough. Once again I’d like to remind folks to prepare now for the coming uptick in severe weather season. The last thing you want to have happen is realize that you didn’t prepare a “safe place” as a tornadic supercell bears down on your town…or neighborhood. Last but not least, the amount of news concerning climate change has been on the increase as more and more research data confirms that planet Earth’s climate is indeed not what it used to be. On the hopeful side, there are some bright lights in sustainability and renewable energy news.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

From the archives, a disconcerting read on data brokers and what they know about you.

SUSTAINABILITY/RENEWABLES

Would be nice to see this come to fruition. “The Dutch Windwheel is not only a silent wind turbine – it’s also an incredible circular apartment building.”

Here’s some good news on the renewables front…in 2015, more than 10 percent of the electricity used in Texas came from wind turbines.

A very informative read on the indicators for measuring the sustainability of cities.

I’d gladly give one of these a test run! “Rollable solar charger provides portable green energy wherever you go.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Yet another potentially volatile scenario indicating the strong link between our climate and biosphere.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Many folks, especially in the northeastern USA states, have had their fill of snow. Back in February, 2010, for a brief period all 50 states had snow somewhere within their state lines.

Clouds have a secret language all their own. Learn to “read” it fluently, and you’ll be leagues ahead of 99.9% of the world’s population.

The term “polar vortex” has been tossed about a great deal as of late. Here’s a basic explanation of what it really is.

NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center has their global analysis for January, 2015…and save for the eastern part of the USA, it was a warm month worldwide.

Speaking of a warm January, 2015 started off in global climate warmth where 2014 left off.

An interesting read on how tree rings can give scientists a look at climates past.

The hazards of winter weather aren’t just limited to slick roads. Here’s some good information from the CDC on winter weather safety.

As is the case with hurricanes, tornadoes, flash floods, etc., winter weather events can tally up a staggering toll in the billions.

A picture (in this case…a word cloud) is worth a thousand words…and gives insight into the chasm between climate science and climate science denial.

From DeSmog Blog: “With the news of Willie Soon’s fossil-fuel-funded career featured on the front page of The New York Times on Sunday, there’s no time like the present to take a look at all of Soon’s friends in the anti-science climate denial echo chamber.” While we’re hot on the trail, it appears that malfeasance “pal review” has been the modus operandi amongst deniers for years.

Many storm chasers like to brag about chasing “extreme” weather…but Antarctica would give all of them a run for their money.

Hurricane hunters that have no qualms about flying through a category 5 hurricane would never dream of flying through a supercell blasting across the Oklahoma prairie. Here’s why.

That’s a wrap for this post…

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Nov. 16 – 23, 2014

The big weather news this week has been the lake effect snowfall that brought an astounding amount of snow to parts of New York state. This is definitely one for the record books. Even though some portions of North America are accustomed to several feet of snow per year, this event caught many folks by surprise. This is a good reminder to make sure your winter weather emergency kit is in order. You don’t have to live in the “snow belt” to need one. Many ice storms in the southern plains in the last ten years have left impacts that bordered on a humanitarian crisis.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

An interesting new trend in China. Citizens using social media to report air quality.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

I’d love to see more of these. “TreeHouse is like Home Depot with a green conscience.”

Could the USA get ten percent of its energy from solar power by 2030? It’s certainly a worthy goal.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s just a small sample of some amazing images of the recent lake effect snows.

The latest winter weather outlook from the Climate Prediction Center is out for December-February. Please note this is an outlook and not a forecast.

According to information from NOAA, our humble planet is on track to have 2014 as the warmest year on record.

Very interesting read: “Debunked Conspiracy Climategate Five Years Later.”

A long-read that’s worth the time. “Climate change is not just about science – it’s about the future we want to create.”

More research is needed (that’s the nature of science anyway), but there’s a growing body of evidence that our winter weather events and climate change are connected.

When was the last time you looked at the clouds? Here’s a good listen that puts a sound argument for staring at something other than our smartphones.

And that’s a wrap for this week…stay warm folks!

Cheers!

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