Tag Archives: environmental science

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For August 8 – 16, 2017

Greetings everyone! It’s been a busy weather and science news week with a story on virtually any topic from A to Z. Recent severe weather events, including the 6 August 2017 Tulsa, OK tornado have kept me busy & delayed this post by one day. So…without further delay, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

 

EDUCATION

This isn’t strictly limited to science education, but is applicable to everyone…regardless of your occupation. “9 Super Successful People Share Their Reading Habits.” As a voracious reader, I can attest to the validity of the information within the article.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into weather and citizen science, one way you can contribute is taking part in the mPING crowdsourcing project. Whether using a desktop or mobile device, you can contribute valuable data year round to the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) to help weather research. The mobile app is free and available for iOS or Android.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Regardless of where you live and what hazards you may be susceptible to, an emergency kit is essential to any home or workplace. They’re easier to put together than you think too!

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Conveying science to the general public is a daunting challenge. The answer to this challenge is in using less “jargon” and explaining the basic facts.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

An interesting look at how the solar energy industry will handle the 21 August 2017 solar eclipse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What does the USA’s National Weather Service do? More than you can imagine. Here’s a great overview of a government agency that quite often saves lives in addition to putting together your local forecast.

Here’s the latest US Drought Monitor. Dry conditions continue to worsen across the north central states.

Graphic courtesy @DroughtCenter

NOAA has just released an updated 2017 Atlantic hurricane season outlook. There are some substantial changes from the outlook in May. Remember, an outlook is not a forecast. The bottom line, a more active season is now expected.

Graphic courtesy National Weather Service Caribou, Maine

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report reiterates what many of us have suspected the past few months. 2016 surpassed 2015 as the warmest year in 137 years of record keeping.

 

The State Of The Climate map below shows a startling increase in global surface temperatures. From the report, “Aided by the strong El Niño early in the year, the 2016 annual global surface temperature observed record warmth for a third consecutive year, with the 2016 annual global surface temperature surpassing the previous record of 2015.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA National Center For Environmental Information

Climate Central has an excellent read on the recent data on 2016 being a record year for global climate change.

As global temperature trends rise, are we willing to face the role current generations play in the lives of future ones and how climate change will affect their world?

A new analysis with data from NASA shows the vast El Niño weather pattern of 2014–16 caused tropical forests to produce approximately 3 billion tons of carbon. That’s equivalent to nearly 20% of the emissions produced during the same period by making cement and burning fossil fuels.

If you think that heat waves in cities across the USA are longer than in years past, you’d be correct. Extended streaks of heat, most likely in urban areas due to the heat island effect, are becoming more common.

Climate change deniers had a field day with a recent SNAFU within a New York Times story.

After 30 years, the challenge of dealing with the Earth’s ozone problem still remains very elusive.

New Orleans is once again dealing with floods. This city, which largely rests below sea level, will continue to have flooding problems until either a proper infrastructure is in place, or the city no longer exists.

After the Tulsa tornado of 6 August 2017, there was quite an unnecessary backlash and reaction to the “tornado sirens” not being sounded in the city of Tulsa. This was the correct decision. Here’s an infographic on the basis of what these archaic toys are meant for. Opinions vary on the usefulness of these sirens, but they have many faults and are (at best) Cold War era technology that is, at best, minimally useful. My sound advice: forget sirens even exist. There are far more effective means of getting potential life-saving weather warnings.

Graphic courtesy National Weather Service Tulsa, Oklahoma

PUBLIC POLICY

This should come as no surprise to those of us in Oklahoma who are familiar with our former attorney general’s proclivities. “Scott Pruitt Brushes Off ‘So-Called Settled Science’ On Conservative Radio Show.” Keep in mind that this individual is now the head of the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency. He also doesn’t want to “politicize science,” but due to the nature of our rapidly changing society, that can’t be done.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the ride!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Links Week In Review For August 1 – 8, 2017

Greetings to everyone! This has been an active and interesting weather week across much of North America. Many areas that are normally broiling in temperatures well into the mid to upper 90’s are enjoying cool nights and afternoon highs 10 – 15 degrees cooler. I, for one, am not complaining one bit! A severe weather day for parts of the southern plains brought an EF-2 tornado through parts of midtown Tulsa, OK during the early morning hours of 6 August 2017 resulting in at least 30 injuries. Last but not least, the tropical Atlantic has been more active than in previous weeks…and the peak of the hurricane season is still to come. There’s plenty of other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Here’s an excellent read on communicating science to the general public. “There are too many important issues that science has reached a consensus on that the public has not.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This spectacular new dinosaur fossil is bound to bring great enthusiasm to my fellow dinosaur fans.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

This is truly amazing! “Humanity’s farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, achieve 40 years of operation and exploration this August and September. Despite their vast distance, they continue to communicate with NASA daily, still probing the final frontier.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Based on new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data, the USA’s Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone (oxygen-deprived water where fish can’t survive) is the largest since it started measuring in 1985.

Congratulation Miami! You’ve taken a very bold step. Now, who’s the next city with the chutzpah to make this kind of decision? “South Miami this week became the first city outside of California to require all new homes to install solar panels on their roofs.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent interactive map from the National Weather Service (NWS) in Tulsa, OK with a detailed survey of the Tulsa tornado of 6 August 2017. The tornado formed from a rapidly moving Quasi Linear Convective System (QLCS) and raced at almost 50 mph across midtown portions of the city. This event should be a start reminder that should be a stark reminder that, in spite of the climatological norms, tornadoes do not follow a calendar. “Tornado Season” in the USA runs from January 1 – December 31…and tornadoes can also occur at any time of the day or night and are not limited to forming under a photogenic supercell.

Check out NOAA’s interactive map of the history of the hottest summer day at thousands of locations across the USA.

A new visualization from Climate Central shows a history of global warming in only 35 seconds.

From Climate Central, a startling, but not surprising, survey. “The World Economic Forum surveyed 750 experts on what the most likely and impactful risks facing humanity are in 2017. They ranked extreme weather as the most likely risk and the second-most impactful, trailing only the use of weapons of mass destruction.”

Traveling by commercial aircraft can be challenging enough…but climate change could be introducing a whole new level of inconvenience.

For decades, the urban heat island effect has kept many large cities warmer than surrounding areas. Climate change is poised to make those warmer-than-average urban environments even hotter.

The monsoon season for Arizona, USA residents has been going full throttle in no small part due to the influences of climate change.

The USA isn’t the only country that has histrionic summers. This year has been a rough summer for our friends in Sweden.

I’ve yet to see one of these, but hope to one day…if I can only keep from blinking at the wrong moment! The common but elusive green flash of sunsets.

Truth stranger than fiction. Federal scientists, including those from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have published a 543-page report with startling information on climate change. They’re trying to get the word out before the current presidential administration can bury the report.

That’s a wrap for this post! You can also find Tornado Quest on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr at the links below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Links Week In Review For July 25 – August 1, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you live. Here in the USA’s Great Plains, we’re enjoying an unseasonably pleasant cool spell, but the summer heat will be back soon enough. For the time being, the tropical Atlantic is relatively quiet…but the peak of the hurricane season is still several weeks away.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Many folks have push notifications turned on for countless apps. For your own sake and sanity, turn them off. I only have text messages and emails going…and I couldn’t be happier.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

If you’re considering a career in the sciences, you’re going to need a thorough background in math. Start early…you won’t regret it.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read from Science Friday on how to view the upcoming solar eclipse safely.

The quote attributed to Carl Sagan that “we are made of star stuff” is emphasized even more so in this good read. “Half The Atoms Inside Your Body Came From Across The Universe.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This is awesome news for the Sooner State! Oklahoma will soon be home to what could be the largest wind farm in the USA! This is definitely a step in the right direction!

Speaking of wind energy, solar and wind are not “alternative” energy sources anymore. We have got a long way to go to make a dent in climate change, but fortunately, they are already mainstream.

Al Gore’s film “An Inconvenient Truth” has a new sequel that is not only an update but shows everyday citizens how they can contribute to helping our planet’s environment.

For severe weather and hurricane research, specially equipped aircraft are used. For research into wildfires, the planes used are a different breed of aircraft altogether.

As of late, the western USA has seen a brutal episode of wildfires with almost 5.2 million acres burned from January to late July 2017…and there are several more months left with no let up in sight.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting set of charts from Climate Central on risks to our way of life. As depicted in the first one, climate change and natural disasters supersede every other risk.

Even without an El Niño event (which brings warm ocean water to the surface, temporarily causing average global surface temperatures to rise), 2017 is already setting global temperature records.

If you’re a RadarScope user, you may occasionally notice that a radar is down. Radars, like all other forms of technology, require maintenance and chances are that’s why there’s no data.

Here’s a look at Tornado Warnings issued by the USA’s National Weather Service as of 31 July 2017.

Graphic courtesy Iowa Environmental Mesonet

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for fun. We’re living in interesting times, so hang around for some thought provoking topics.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For July 10 – 18, 2017

Greetings once again to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We get visitors from all over the world…and for some of you, it’s winter. For those of us in North America, it is incredibly hot across much of the continent with no let-up in sight. One would think they’d get used to this kind of wretched heat, but that’s not the case…at least for me. Stay safe if you’ve got to be out in the heat. As for tropical cyclone activity, the eastern Pacific and Atlantic are active for the moment, but fortunately none of the ongoing areas of concern as of this date are of any significant threat. Then again, this is only July and the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season is still several weeks away. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re looking for an excellent citizen science project for home, work, or school, check out the CoCoRaHS project!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’re getting some spectacular images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot…a massive storm that has been in progress for hundreds of years.

Space isn’t empty…and it certainly isn’t a quiet place.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Though this study linking ozone pollution and cardiovascular health was done on Chinese adults, it most certainly applies to cities all over the globe.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A new and important National Oceanographic And Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report has just been issued. Our humble home had its second warmest year to date and its third warmest June on record.

Some recent severe weather research has had some interesting results in Oklahoma. An experimental model predicted the path of a Oklahoma tornado a few hours before it formed.

Here’s a look at the latest US Drought Monitor. Severe and Extreme conditions continue to worsen in Montana and the Dakotas.

Conveying climate change information to the general public is a daunting task. Moving beyond doomsday reporting is essential if atmospheric scientists are to gain the public trust.

Certain locations in the USA will be affected by climate change much earlier than others. Here’s a look at some particularly vulnerable coastal areas.

Many people wonder if their individual actions can make a difference in climate change. Fortunately, I can answer in the affirmative. There are many things you can do to make a difference.

Now that you know what you can do, check out how old you are in CO2.

Eighteen military installations vital to the protection and security of the USA are endangered by climate change.

From a global perspective, the extreme heat that is felt with increasing frequency could become the climatological norm.

Interesting video of one of the most intriguing entrepreneurs you can meet. “Richard Branson, the founder and chair of the Virgin Group speaks during a panel discussion in New York and says the threat of climate change actually offers ‘one of the great opportunities for this world’.”

This is an old story that has been raised from the dead…most likely for hyperbole since it’s been a non-issue issue from the get go. “Female-named hurricanes are most likely not deadlier than male hurricanes.”

PUBLIC POLICY

Understandably so, many countries are expressing well-deserved dismay on the USA’s threat to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

This should come as no surprise to Oklahomans who know him so very well. “Scott Pruitt Pretty Much Just Confirmed He’s Out To Dismantle The EPA.”

Socioeconomic ramifications of climate change are significant and require far more attention than they’re presently getting. Recent studies show that, “the pain of climate change will fall more heavily on America’s poorest bits than on its richest areas.”

If you want to help make the world a better place, collective action is much more effective than ineffectual individualism. As the saying goes, “there is power in numbers.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and invite you to check out Tornado Quest’s other social media outlets listed below. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Interesting times ahead…so stick around for the fray!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 3 – 10, 2017

Greetings again to one and all!  I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you live. Here in the Great Plains of the USA, the summer heat has settled in. It’s not unusual, but this weather geek never gets used to it. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

A very thought provoking essay on concerns with how science is taught in our classrooms.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Would you like some citizen science to go along with your sun, sand, and surf? You’ve got it…right here!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Many had hopes that life could exist on Mars. Those hopes were dashed as the surface of the “red planet” is more than a little uninhabitable.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

We are forced to adapt and confront the fact that the largest expanse of coral reefs in the world is dying before our eyes.

While challenging and forcing you to face old habits, becoming plastic free as possible is not that difficult.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

June 2017 was another warm month for the planet in general and specifically in parts of the southwestern USA, western Europe, and Siberia.

Global surface air temperature anomaly for June 2017 relative to the June average for the period 1981-2010. Source: ERA-Interim. (Credit: ECMWF, Copernicus Climate Change Service)

A look at mean temperature percentile for the contiguous USA for June 2017. (Credit: NOAA National Centers For Environmental Information)

A chunk of ice about the size of the state of Delaware is about to break off in Antarctica. When it does break off, it will be one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.

There are many ideas regarding ice loss in Antarctica (which is normal for properly conducted science) and that can seem overwhelming to the lay public. Here’s a good overview on what to believe about the Antarctic ice loss.

Speaking of Antarctica, its ice-free areas are predicted to reach proportions that will affect the unique animal life and terrestrial plant life that exists there.

While a great deal of attention is given to Antarctica, Greenland is going though an equally disturbing amount of melting directly linked to climate change.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows drought conditions spreading rapidly in the Dakotas and Montana. Moderate drought continues in parts of Arizona, California, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

A great read from meteorologist Dan Satterfield: Yet Another Climate Myth Is Gone.

How hot could your city get by the year 2100? Taking heat island effects into consideration, far hotter than you’ll want your grandchildren to endure.

Last but not least, a quick reminder of summer Heat Safety. Deaths from summer heat are preventable with a few simple steps.

PUBLIC POLICY

A particularly disturbing read…especially in the context that this has been done in a deliberately clandestine manner. “Trump’s Alarming Environmental Rollback: What’s Been Scrapped So Far.”

EPA head Scott Pruitt feels climate science is broken and needs to be fixed. That’s rich.

Here’s an excellent essay on how climate change denialism has turned into something far darker and more dangerous than previously thought. “Their goal is to sow uncertainty in the public mind about what the science shows.” These nefarious interests are, when it comes down to brass tacks, trying to convey a sense of confusion amongst the general public.

In spite of the fact that a vast majority of earth scientists feel we are on the brink of sinking into the abyss of a new Dark Age, a few are standing up and fighting back.

The G20 summit has ended on a very dour note…which could have been avoided altogether if the USA had an administration capable of comprehending science and diplomacy. “Our world has never been so divided.” “Centrifugal forces have never been so powerful. Our common goods have never been so threatened.” – French President Emmanuel Macron

A former Republican congressman and noted climate change denialist has been picked to be the head of the infamous Heartland Institute. Surprised?

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 19 – 27, 2017

Greetings everyone and welcome! I hope your summer (or winter for Southern Hemisphere folks) is going well. Here in North America, it’s certainly been warming up right on schedule. The Atlantic tropical season got off to an early start with a tropical storm making landfall in early June near the Texas and Louisiana coastal border region. As of this date (27 June 2017), Tropical Storm Dora is moving along the Mexico coast and dumped copious amounts of rainfall. Due to several ongoing projects, I had to delay publishing this post by one day…so let’s get started on this week’s topics.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you have a smart phone, an interest in weather, and would like to be a part of citizen science while contributing to National Severe Storm Laboratory weather research, the free mPING app is for you! It’s a very small app (so it won’t take up a lot of space on any smart phone…iOS or Android) is super easy to use, and can be used by you year round from all across North America. You can read more about the mPING project here.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

As those of us in the Great Plains of the USA well know, wildfires used to be an uncommon phenomenon. As of late, that has changed…and many plains states have seen year after year of devastating fires.

If any country can accomplish this, Sweden can. “Sweden Commits To Becoming Carbon Neutral By 2045 With New Law.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

From the American Meteorological Society: TV Weathercasters’ Views Of Climate Change Appear To Be Rapidly Evolving.

It’s a difficult conversation, but having a heart-to-heart talk with kids about climate change is absolutely essential.

Though the focus on this article is the UK, it applies to any country that deals with heatwaves. To call them a national emergency is not an overreaction. Annually, heat kills more people than floods, lightning, tornadoes, high wind events, etc. combined.

A new study looks ahead several decades at what a warmer world would be like for humans. By the end of this century, the picture isn’t pretty.

While still on the topic of increasing global heat, here are two interesting reads on increasing high temperatures, first from Climate Central – ” Days Above 100F: Projections.” and the New York Times – “95-Degree Days: How Extreme Heat Could Spread Across The World.”

A look at seven climate change hotspots around the world. Yes, one of them is right here in the USA…New York state.

If you fly often, climate change may have an affect on the way you travel as well as the availability of flights.

We’ve just had the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. Here’s a nice concise summer solstice article that tells you everything you need to know.

PUBLIC POLICY

Some very courageous USA cities are teaming up to post climate data taken down by the current presidential administration.

When politicians distort science and “cherry pick” false data in their traditional opportunistic fashion, scientists and academics are shocked and often sit on the sidelines. That has got to come to a stop…now.

The USA’s Interior Department is planning on dismissing employees by the thousands as environmental protection and concerns are dismissed as frivolous by the current presidential administration. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is marching lockstep with the same intent.

Finally, “Rick Got Rolled” but somehow I have a feeling that Rick Perry doesn’t get it nor cares. Nevertheless, the American Meteorological Society has had their fill of climate change denialism amongst politicians, media pundits, etc. and they’re sharpening their swords.

That’s a wrap for this post. I’d like to take a moment and welcome with thanks my new followers in social media. As of late, the social media landscape has taken on perilous dimensions. Like it or not, to make a difference and make our voices heard, it would behoove us to diversify our topics of interest…hence the fact that Tornado Quest has never been a “one note drone” that goes dormant save for severe weather events. I am involved in and feel strongly about many environmental issues, climate and weather of all kinds, our rapidly changing technology (especially the growth of renewable energy), and much more.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For June 12 – 19, 2017

Greetings to all! There’s plenty of topics to go over this week and with all eyes on the Atlantic/Caribbean region, much of the focus is on early season tropical activity. With that in mind, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some really great news on the renewables front! Wind and solar power met over ten percent of USA’s March 2017 electric power demand.

Meanwhile in Germany, they’ve broken their own renewable energy record by getting eighty-five percent of its energy needs from renewable sources in April 2017.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With the current tropical activity in the Atlantic hurricane basin, here’s the comprehensive National Hurricane Center’s Hurricane Safety Homepage. Regardless of what this year’s season brings to North America, even a tropical storm can have devastating effects. Remember, it only takes one storm to make a major disaster.

Here’s a look at the summer outlook from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center for the period of July through September. First, let’s look at temperature which shows above average for most of the contiguous USA and Alaska.

Here’s a look at the Climate Prediction Center’s outlook for precipitation for the same time period. Only small parts of the contiguous USA and western Alaska are indicated to have slightly above average precipitation.

It’s important to keep in mind that these are outlooks and not forecasts and are based on different data sets, statistics, and other information than forecasts.

According to recently released NASA data, May 2017 was the second-warmest May on record. It’s yet another data set and reminder of the continuing climate change trend that’s occurring globally.

Considering the location, height above sea level, climate change, and vulnerability to tropical cyclones, Houston area residents are understandably concerned over catastrophic flooding.

This past summer in Antarctica had widespread ice melt. El Nino did play one major part.

Speaking of Antarctica, a large portion of an ice shelf in Antarctica will break off and collapse into the ocean. The ramifications can extend to global effects.

Here are some very good graphics from Climate Central explaining how small changes in climactic averages add up to big changes in climate and weather extremes.

Understanding the complexities of climate science required paying very close attention to details even if they seem unrelated.

Fascinating and thought provoking read. “New Research May Resolve A Climate ‘Conundrum’ Across The History Of Human Civilization.”

Taking a look back to get a good perspective on future climate. “Revisiting A Climate Data Viz Icon.”

Climate science denialists are quite the piece of work. “Editor Of New ‘Sham Journal’ Is Climate Science Denier With Ties To Heartland Institute.”

Here’s a new term for your atmospheric science glossary: Ice Lollies.

PUBLIC POLICY

Should we be surprised by this? No. “The Energy Department is closing an office that works with other countries to develop clean energy technology, another sign of the Trump administration’s retreat on climate-related activities after its withdrawal from the Paris agreement this month.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media and let you know that I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 5 – 12, 2017

Greetings to one and all! For those of us in North American, summer is in full swing with sizzling temperatures expected for the next several days. Summer heat is a highly underrated weather hazard and I’ve got some outstanding information from the National Weather Service in this week’s post. As for severe weather, it’s going to be a very quiet period for much of the Great Plains the next few days. Overall, May 2017 was quieter than usual across the contiguous USA with the number of tornadoes, high wind, and hail reports being below normal. And, of course, the big news of the past few days has been the USA’s decision to discontinue commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement. Fortunately, at the state and local level, there’s a groundswell gathering momentum that will hold to the commitment and do the right thing. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s begin.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re looking for a way to help out weather research with crowdsourcing citizen science, the mPING project is for you. The free app is easy to use and you can send reports year round for a variety of weather conditions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

We’ve just observed World Oceans Day. Considering that approximately 75% of the surface of the earth is covered by water, it behooves us all to have a thorough understanding of how our oceans work and how important they are to our forms of life.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a look back at severe weather activity in the USA for May, 2017. Of note are two events recorded in Oklahoma…a 104mph non-tornadic gust reported at the Walters, OK Oklahoma Mesonet station and a 4.25″ hailstone that was documented in Okfuskee County, OK. The number of tornadoes nationwide was 290…only slightly higher than the statistical average of 276. Overall, it was a below normal month in severe weather activity.

Infographic courtesty NOAA Storm Prediction Center

This week marks the anniversary of the June 8, 1974 Great Plains tornado outbreak. While not one of the larger outbreaks of recent years, long-time residents remember this event well. The Tulsa, OK metro was hit by three tornadoes with up to EF-3 damage in some areas. The deadliest tornado was the Drumright, OK EF-4 which killed fourteen people along a thirty mile long path. Here’s a overview of the events across several great plains states.

This is also the anniversary of the Barneveld, Wisconsin EF-5 tornado. The Milwaukee, WI National Weather Service has a comprehensive overview.

Here’s a look at the dangers of sea level rise in the USA according to new data from NOAA.

Many American residents who don’t have a good understanding of hour weather and climate work are prime targets for climate change denialists who prey on their lack of earth science knowledge.

While on the topic of the American public, Dr. Marshall Shepherd has written and excellent essay on fifteen suggestions for broadcast meteorologists on conveying weather information to their viewers.

Flooding in the USA kills more people annually than tornadoes, lightning, high winds, and hurricanes combined. It would behoove those of us in America to take the threat of climate change induced flooding very, very seriously.

Summer heat is settling in across much of North America. By observing heat safety tips, heat illnesses and deaths can be prevented.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

PUBLIC POLICY

One of the most thought-provoking articles I’ve read as of late. The subtitle says it all and it right on the mark. “For too long, liberals have been treating climate change as a third or fourth tier issue. As the US exits the Paris Climate Accord, it’s time for liberals to re-evaluate an issue that subsumes all others.”

In some form of media, climate change denial, both scientific and political, is nurtured in a variety of ways. Most of it goes unchallenged. It’s time to change that and call the denialists out. This will also require some introspection on the part of those of us who accept the overwhelming evidence of climate change science.

A disturbingly unsettling read on six ways budget cuts will hamper NOAA’s weather forecasting capabilities. Yes, this will affect you in more ways than you can imagine.

As of this post, thirteen states in the USA are continuing on with their commitment to the Paris Agreement. Let’s hope that in short order many other states join their ranks.

While on the topic of dedication to commitment, here’s another good read from Climate Central on how the USA can hold to its promise for the Paris Agreement.

Asking public officials if they “believe” in climate change is the wrong way to attempt an initiation of a productive dialogue.

Last but not least, is there a way that individual Americans can still follow the Paris Climate Agreement? Absolutely. Here’s how.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 30 – June 5, 2017

Greetings to everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Summer is settling in over much of North America and the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has officially started. For the time being, it’ll be rather quiet in terms of severe weather activity for North America. Obviously, the big news this week is the announcement of the USA’s pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord. This is a major story with international implications and we’ll cover numerous links on that topic. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into citizen science and weather, check out CoCoRaHS…a very popular network of people across North America, the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, & USA Virgin Islands that send in valuable weather information every day!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

For many residents of coastal Louisiana, USA, watching the coastline change due to climate change is more than an environmental crisis, but an economic one as well.

Pittsburg, PA is spearheading a revolution by planning to transition to 100% renewable-energy sources, like solar and wind, by 2035.

Our planet’s oceans are so vital to our very survival. Here’s a good list of ten things that you can do on land to help save the Earth’s oceans.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past May 31st marked the fourth anniversary of the El Reno, OK tornado. Of all the significant tornadoes I can recall over 45+ years, few have stirred as much contentious discussion as this event. The National Weather Service in Norman, OK has an excellent video overview of this exceptionally dangerous storm. Storm chaser Skip Talbot’s “Safety Lessons from El Reno” video is one of the most thorough reviews of this watershed event.

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has officially begun. NOAA is anticipating an above-average year in the number of tropical cyclones.

Here’s a quick list of five important hurricane preparedness factors to take into consideration. Number five is perhaps the most important. No matter how many tropical cyclones form, it takes only one to make a life and death situation hit home with you.

The National Weather Service also has a comprehensive website covering almost everything you need to know about hurricane preparedness.

With hurricane season starting, both NOAA and FEMA are without anyone at the helm. That should be very worrisome to all of us.

Summer heat is settling in over many areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Here’s some very important summer weather safety information from the National Weather Service. As with all weather hazards, a little preparation goes a long way. This not only covers summer heat, but severe weather, air pollution, and pet safety.

Summer is also in full gear for Scandinavia in spite of the fact that parts of Sweden got snowfall in June. Truth be known, this is not unusual for their climate.

Based on NOAA data for May 2017, carbon dioxide set another record on our planet…and we’ve no one to blame but ourselves.

PUBLIC POLICY

Here’s a statement from the European Union Climate Action and Energy Commissioner on the USA’s announcement to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. “Today is a sad day for the global community, as a key partner turns its back on the fight against climate change. The EU deeply regrets the unilateral decision by the Trump administration to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement.

Many scientists, including meteorologists and climatologists, had plenty to say regarding the decision of the Trump administration to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

The inimitable Chuck Doswell has shared his own views on this event and, in his own unique style, has written a spot-on essay.

For any country to leave the Paris Climate Accord is to take on the responsibility and burden of increasing the risk to their county’s public health…both physical and mental.

The Atlantic published this story on 9 May 2017 regarding the EPA’s dismissal of half its scientific board. It’s hard to not believe that it could be related (i.e. preparation) for the Trump administration, specifically EPA head Scott Pruitt, to break the USA’s commitment to the Paris Agreement.

This rejection of the Paris Agreement could have handed climate change deniers a very small “victory” that will only be sweet in a most temporary manner.

On the change that there’s a bright side to this unfortunate political gaffe, it’s the fact that other countries as well as USA states and cities can carry on their vows to meet our Paris commitment.

If Trumps climate speech of 1 June 2017 seemed FUBAR to you in regards to facts, you’re not alone.

““A lot of people portray evangelicals as anti-science. Evangelicals accept a lot of science, just not the parts that conflict their faith.” As a life-long resident of the bible belt, I can assure you that this is true. Cherry-picking is the modus operandi for evangelicals…and climate change is no exception.

Last but not least, this is always worth re-sharing…

That’s a wrap for this post! A sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

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