Tag Archives: fracking

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For December 20 – 27, 2016

Holiday greetings to one and all! If you were celebrating the holiday, I hope it was a good one for your family, friends, and you. This week’s post will be on the brief side while I take a few days off during the holiday season and attend to the typical yuletide routine. There’s plenty to read over in spite of the holidays…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If Twitter seems to be losing it’s luster, you can thank a substantial decrease in civility and meaningful interaction along with, “harassment, abuse, bullying, intimidation, threats — a ceaseless flickering hum of low-level emotional violence.” From my own personal observations, many accounts (especially politically derived ones) are disturbingly combative. Others are strictly about self promotion and shilling. The decline of Twitter has been predicted for years, yet it still hangs on. Time will tell whether or not it will last the rest of this decade.

GENERAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC POLICY

As is often the unfortunate case, politicians are routinely untruthful. That begs the question, “If politicians can lie without condemnation, what are scientists to do?”

There’s a very important lesson scientists could learn from President-Elect Trump’s victory…and now more than ever, the experts need to closely listen to the public.

Speaking of an election, “Canadian Scientists Warn USA Colleagues: Act Now To Protect Science Under Trump.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

An excellent read by Caren Cooper. “Quality And Quantity With Citizen Science.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A Normandy village is home to the world’s first solar panel road.

The USA’s EPA has released a revised report on fracking…and this time the writing is done with a bit more caution.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Why do some people think that climate change is not happening? Sometimes it’s more than just politics or peer pressure…it’s a misunderstanding and mistaking local weather events as being the same as global climate trends.

An excellent climate change read for weather geeks and environmental interest folks by Katharine Hayhoe: Why Climate Change Should Matter to You.

Never underestimate the power of a grassroots movement. “Mothers Unleash Their Organizing Power On Climate.”

Here’s a very concise overview of the climate change reasons behind the current warm Arctic winter. “For the Arctic, like the globe as a whole, 2016 has been exceptionally warm. For much of the year, Arctic temperatures have been much higher than normal, and sea ice concentrations have been at record low levels.”

Speaking of a warm winter, it’s almost certain that 2016 will be yet another record-breaking warm winter for the USA.

THE QUIXOTIC

Oh my…there are some good times ahead in the USA. With people of this ilk in an presidential advisory position, who needs circus clowns?

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For December 12 – 20, 2016

Greetings everyone! For those of you across North America, I hope you’re managing to stay warm during the current cold snap. It certainly adds a bit of ‘zing’ to the holiday season. Speaking of the holidays, this post and the following two will be on the brief side. It’s a crazy, busy time of year for many of us and I’m no exception. Still, there are important topics to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A wide variety of science fields are covered in this particular retrospective on the twelve key science moments of 2016.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

What’s the best way to communicate scientific concepts that are often very complex to the general public? “It turns out that even in the world of scientific writing, your eighth-grade teacher was right: how you write can matter as much as what you write.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news for astronomy fans. The world’s largest digital survey of the visible Universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

When the air quality in a city is so bad that airline traffic is cancelled, you know it’s air that is literally lethal to breathe.

Here’s an excellent read and infographic on reducing your plastic pollution. The plastics that are part of many life saving items aren’t the problem, it’s the “daily plastics” that aren’t always necessary and so easily discarded that are the challenge.

The Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association has released a “fact” sheet on waste water injection/fracking and it’s relation to the recent and dramatic increase of earthquakes in the Sooner State. For reasons that are blatantly obvious, they’re not taking responsibility for their actions. This is public relations cherry-picking at its best.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An unsettling read from Climate Central: Scientists Are Saving Climate Data; This Is Why It Matters. “In recent days, efforts have sprung up to archive climate data on federal sites. They’ve been spurred by fears that the Trump administration could take a hostile stance toward climate science and that budget cuts could make data less accessible.”

A very unsettling essay by climate scientist Michael E. Mann that is a “must read” for anyone interested in the atmospheric sciences. “I’m A Scientist Who Has Gotten Death Threats. I Fear What May Happen Under Trump.”

Here’s a look at NOAA’s global State Of The Climate report for November, 2016. First, let’s take a look at selected climate anomalies and events.

201611Here’s the global temperature trends for November. While much of North America was quite above normal, parts of Europe and Asia were unseasonably cool.

201612

After a very warm November in North America, 2016 had to get one last cold shot in before year’s end. Watching it take place across surface observations (especially the Oklahoma Mesonet) was quite a sight.

Finally, a rather impertinent view of the never-to-be-settled-argument on school closings and winter weather. In this game, you just can’t win, even when erring on the side of justifiable caution.


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 17 – 29, 2016

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. For those in the USA who celebrated the holiday, I hope you had a very Happy Thanksgiving. I took advantage of the rare opportunity for some R&R time for myself, so this week’s post will be a bit shorter than usual, but still full of thought-provoking ideas. There’s plenty to catch up on, especially on the front lines of climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If you celebrated the USA’s Thanksgiving holiday, be thankful for many things, including science. There’s a myriad of topics to discuss and inspire a sense of wonder.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A reminder that even though winter may be settling in across North America, your mPING and CoCoRaHS reports are still important. They’re not just for severe thunderstorms. Every single report counts!

GEOGRAPHY

The Mercator maps that so many of us are familiar with give a very distorted view of the world. How distorted? This article with an interactive map with show you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Interesting news on Mars. “Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what’s in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Oklahomans are suing frackers over earthquakes. I sincerely wish them luck in their pursuit of justice. Their defendants are capriciously deviant and very wealthy.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

People in urban areas are at risk of air pollution induced health problems with around 85% exposed to levels deemed harmful by the World Health Organization. These particles are too small to see or smell, but have a devastating impact.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What scientists are seeing happening to the Arctic ice is both surprising and not a little alarming. Another spot-on and apt description is that the current scenario is, “seriously weird.”

The first decade of the 21st century set the pace. From Climate Central: USA Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming.

Perilous times ahead in the USA regarding climate science & renewable energy. “The world is waiting to hear what President-elect Donald Trump has in mind for governing the U.S. Among the biggest questions is what will happen to the budget for climate and energy-related activities.”

An ominous note to what lays ahead in the world wide theater. In early 2017, the USA is poised to begin a potentially disastrous retreat from climate science leadership. China is more than happy to step up, don the crown and seat themselves in the throne. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

The new GOES-R weather satellite is the most advanced one launched to date. It will not only provide amazing data, but could save your life someday.

As expected, Trump intends to dump the Paris climate accord, but at least 71 percent of the American public support it.

chart_paris-agreement-survey_718x361

It’s been a very quiet year in the USA for tornadoes. As of November 21, 2016, 830 preliminary tornado reports so far which is well below the statistical average.

cx5qmmouaaaryfw-jpg-largeThat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 29 – September 6, 2016

Greetings to one and all! It’s been quite a week for the tropical Atlantic and Pacific with several hurricanes, some reaching major intensity, taking the stage front and center. Hurricane Hermine made landfall in the Florida panhandle as a Category 1 storm and was the first hurricane to hit the “Sunshine State” since 2005. As of this post, Hermine is off the northeast coast of the USA and still poses a threat in spite of having lost its tropical characteristics. In the Pacific, hurricanes Madeline and Lester took swipes at Hawaii and gave us a reminder than those chain of islands are very vulnerable to even the most intense tropical cyclones. This post will be on the brief side since the past week has been exceptionally busy with hurricanes and multi-tasking previous commitments and media requests. As usual, there are many good reads on climate change as well as other dimensions of the atmospheric sciences…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Meet the woman who first identified the greenhouse effect in 1856.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION/EDUCATION

An excellent read for those of us who communicate science to the non-scientists. “12 Tips For Scientists Writing For The General Public.”

Yes, art and science can co-exist…and even bolster the scientific mind. From personal experience (I’m an electric bass player) I can say from personal experience that this does work.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

We’ve just gotten a good look at Jupiter’s north pole…and it’s unlike anything we’ve yet encountered in our own solar system.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

This is indeed an amazing and exciting discovery! “Live Thrived On Young Earth. Scientists Discover 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Fossils.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Just after 7:00 AM CDT on 3 September 2016, several midwestern states were shaken by a 5.6 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter near Pawnee, OK. Damage was reported across a wide area of north-central Oklahoma. This earthquake tied the 5.6 OK earthquake of November, 2011 for the strongest in the Sooner states history. Understandably so, Oklahoma ordered fossil fuel wells shut down after the earthquake. After a relatively quiet period of seismic activity, it’s no accident that the record quake was tied. The question Oklahoma residents must ask themselves now it, “When will another substantial earthquake occur…and will it be an even bigger one?”

Here’s a seismograph from the Leonard, OK station of the earthquake.

OK Earthquake Seismograph 3 September 2016

While on the topic of Oklahoma earthquakes, here’s a good story from NPR on fossil fuel production and it’s relation to the sudden recent increase in seismic activity.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE?RENEWABLES

If there was ever a good reason for creating a drought hardy yard and garden, this is it.

Wind power is really taking off in the USA and is now the number two country in the world in installed wind capacity (after China) and number one in wind electricity generated!

The long-term implications of this are irrevocable. “Natural Gas Is Passing Coal As A Source Of CO2 Emissions In The USA.”

The irrevocable link between our air quality and our health. “Air Pollution Is Sending Tiny Magnetic Particles Into Your Brain.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For sixty years, atmospheric scientists have watched a steady wind pattern in the stratosphere faithfully repeating like clockwork every two years. Without warning and for the first time it’s changed direction.

Here’s a very nice visualization of hurricanes that will help you easily understand the anatomy of these amazing storms.

What were hurricane hunters studying when they flew into Hurricane Hermine? Read this to find out! “Capturing The Genesis Of A Hurricane.”

In the northwest Pacific ocean, which happens to be the world’s hotspot for tropical cyclone activity, a new study reveals the land-falling typhoons have become more intense.

In spite of the cynics, it’s good news that the USA and China have formally committed to the Paris Climate Accord.

They took the words right out of my mouth…

  • For climate activists, the growing trend of climate change denialism in recent years isn’t just frustrating—it’s alarming. We know that the longer we wait to shift our energy sources and increase the efficiency with which we utilize the energy we produce, the more jarring the shift will be. Despite the powerful message that world leaders have sent by coming together in Paris to agree to limit warming to 2 degrees, currently national and global plans are not enough to make that a reality.”

Having said that, here’s the rest of the article on how to effectively communicate with a denier.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 5 – 15, 2016

Greetings to everyone! It’s definitely been an interesting week with plenty of climate related news and, unfortunately, deadly flooding ongoing in parts of Louisiana. Some locations have received over 27 inches of rain. I’ve included an infographic on flash flood safety. On the home front, I’ve had a busy August with several projects that have delayed this post by a few days. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

The importance of the history of science to STEM students can’t be understated. “Why Science And Engineering Need To Remind Students Of Forgotten Lessons From History.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Are you using Windows 10? “12 Things You Can Now Do With Windows 10 After The Anniversary Update.”

There’s a dearth of manners in social media. Here’s a very nice read that’s badly needed. “Five Steps To Having Grace On Social Media.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA has just released over 1,000 new images of the surface of Mars and some of them are spectacular!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A very striking video of changes in Greenland’s glaciers since the 1930’s shows the dramatic effects of climate change.

Though this article focuses somewhat on UK and European cities, it applies to other cities (like Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas, et al.) that are prone to ozone and/or air quality issues in the summer months. “Pollutants React In Sunshine To Form More Pollutants.”

The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency was way off mark in a recent study that claimed that fracking and safe water sources can coexist in close proximity.

Speaking of air quality, southern California has been a hotbed of bad air quality for decades. Unfortunately, they’re currently having the worst smog since 2009.

Several USA cities are leading the way from fossil fuels to 100% renewable power. Let’s hope many more cities are bold enough to be added to this list…soon.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’re experiencing flooding or simply need a quick read  on flood safety, here’s a nice infographic from the National Weather Service in Norman, OK. If driving, please remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! (TADD)

Flood Safety Info

Due to climate change, the risk from the Zika virus the mosquitoes that carry it is becoming more than just an obscure annoyance.

In case you missed it, here’s a link to NOAA’s latest and very thorough State Of The Climate report. This is definitely a “must read” for anyone into atmospheric and/or environmental science. (PDF file)

As of July, 2016, the USA is in the midst of its third-hottest year on record according to the latest NOAA data.

Based on NOAA and EPA data, millions of coastal area homes and properties in the USA are at risk of going underwater by the end of the century.

No heat here. This amazing archive of ice cores is literally a look into the climates past of our humble planet.

Here’s an interesting take on what’s apparently a not-so-new rainfall forecasting theory. Scientists using satellite data and statistical techniques have proved that soil and rain are linked in an unexpected way.

As the drought in the western USA continues, another drought is growing at an alarming pace…and almost no one is talking about it.

Time to bring out the cardigans and parkas. Autumn has arrived in parts of Sweden and no, it’s not too early.

In addition to dealing with denialists, climate scientists are also saddled with a segment of the population with climate change apathy…those who think nothing can or should change.

Sorry conspirators. Your “knowledge” of contrails isn’t correct. It’s hard to believe there are people who still buy this rubbish, but then again there are people who believe the earth is flat, ghosts and spirits are real, astrology is a legit science, and the tooth fairy leaves pennies from heaven under your pillow.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun…and learning!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For May 2 – 9, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope your week is going well. As is the case so often for this time of year, this post will be more brief than usual due to several days of ongoing severe weather across North America. Monday’s (9 May 2016) tornadoes were not without a significant amount of damage and, unfortunately, two fatalities. Severe weather is ongoing across the Ohio valley and in Texas. Another round is on tap for Wednesday, 11 May 2016. Still, there’s plenty of other interesting news going on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Considering the sub-par coverage of science topics by the mainstream media, a fact-checking crusade initiated by scientists might not be a bad idea.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

People are still freaking out about the planet Mercury in “retrograde.”  Here’s what’s really going on.

A spectacular look at the 12 “craziest” images ever captured by the Hubble Telescope.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

An interesting new study examines wildfires in California and found that human activity explains as much about their frequency and location as climate influences.

A new map from Climate Central backed by data from NOAA shows the United States has more gas flares than any other country in the world.

Here’s some very good news on the renewable energy front. Solar power is catching on exceptionally fast in the Untied States.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating read (with plenty of links for further research) on rain spawning more rain when it falls on ploughed land.

A very interesting read for my fellow weather geeks. “New Maps Shed Light On The Secret Lives Of Clouds.”

A novel concept…with journal link for further reading. “While hurricanes are a constant source of worry for residents of the southeastern United States, new research suggests that they have a major upside — counteracting global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 14 – 21, 2016

Greetings everyone! Whether you’re in the Northern Hemisphere welcoming spring or the Southern Hemisphere watching the transition to autumn, I hope everyone’s had a good week. A quick reminder that National Weather Service offices across the USA are having Skywarn spotter training courses. Check with your local NWS office for details. In climate news, sea level rise has become a topic of a great deal of discussion as of late. For people living around the world in coastal or low-lying areas, this is a serious concern. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Instagram, in their infinite wisdom, has decided to try what others have failed at or wisely backed out of…arranging posts in order of “relevance.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A major league public health hazard is taking place in Mexico where, “Some 1.1 million vehicles were banned from the metropolis, children & elderly were encouraged to stay indoors, bus & subway services were offered for free amid the first high ozone alert in 14 years.”

An excellent primer on sustainable living in your home.

A very thought-provoking environmental read. “Nature, All Or Nothing.”

Take a look at these spectacular views of some amazing sea landscapes.

A fire and ice challenge for drought plagued California. Preparing for a flood while dealing with a drought.

Could climate change and/or environmental impact warnings on gasoline/petrol pumps actually work? It’s worth a try.

Time to step up to the plate Oklahoma. You should be next in line for this. “Colorado Considers Bill To Make It Easier To Sue Big Oil Over Fracking Earthquakes.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The public’s common mantra of “We didn’t know it was coming.” doesn’t hold up when meteorologists from both the National Weather Service and media have been talking about impending severe weather for up to four days in advance. The fact that said severe weather event occurred in December is irrelevant. When is severe weather season in the USA? From January 1 – December 31. Where does severe weather and/or tornadoes occur? Wherever they’ve occurred in the past…which is in all 50 states.

A very fun read on the twenty funniest and most fitting names in weather, specifically broadcast meteorology.

Why does the sky look bigger in some parts of the world? It’s simply a matter of subjective perspective.

The latest US Drought Monitor for 15 March 2016 shows dry conditions spreading across the central and northern plains while the relentless CA drought continues.

From NOAA: “February Global Temperature Anomaly Sets New Record For The Globe.”

A very nice introduction to a frequently asked question. “Global Warming Basics: What Has Changed?”

Spot on. “There’s good news and there’s bad news: More Americans are concerned about climate change now than at any time in the past eight years. But that’s because the consequences are getting harder to ignore.”

A fascinating read on a new study that looks back on the Earth’s climate, and climate change, up to five million years ago.

An interesting primer on why Nor’ Easters can be more intense than the typical snow-belt snowstorm.

A new series of papers coming from the University of Manchester will be the first extensive study of European tornadoes in ninety-nine years.

This week marks the anniversary of the Tri-State tornado…the deadliest tornado to date in the history of the USA.

Here’s a fun read on rainbows…one of the Earth’s most quixotic atmospheric phenomenon.

 JUST ONE MORE THING…

Get up, and get out. Spending time outdoors in nature is good for your health.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers here on WordPress as well as on Twitter, Instagram, & Tumblr. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

___________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links For February 15 – 22, 2016

Greetings all! I hope everyone’s having a great week. The weather across much of North America has been relatively tranquil this week with unseasonably warm temperatures across much of the southern plains. As of today (22 February 2016) a busy severe weather day is on tap for Tuesday and Wednesday (23 & 24 February 2016) from Texas to the east coast states. Speaking of severe weather, all across the United States the National Weather Service offices are holding Skywarn spotting training classes. If you’re interested in severe weather and contributing to your community, I’d strongly recommend you take one of these courses and spend two (if not more) seasons as an “intern” with a seasoned spotter. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Fortunately, the United States citizenry has a satisfactory of support for science.

In spite of the optimism expressed in the previous link, there’s still putrid bounty of anxiety and antagonism towards science within the US of A.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Sweden, you are amazing in every way! “Sweden To Go Carbon Neutral By 2045.”

Some great tips here! “17 Sustainable Ways To Be A Better Person To Yourself And To Others.”

Four billion people are facing a life-threatening water shortage…and no, the USA is not exempt.

Very interesting, and not surprising, infographic on the world’s most polluted cities.

You know the air in parts of China is bad when ventilation “corridors” are being built so people don’t have to breathe the outdoor air.

Of great interest to many here in Oklahoma. “Does Living Near An Oil Or Natural Gas Well Affect Your Drinking Water?”

Another read for folks in Oklahoma who are constantly barraged with shake, frack, and roll. “Sierra Club Sues Over Oil Company Earthquakes.”

Climate change + drought = a continent-wide volatile scenario. “Mother Africa On Fire.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Interesting interactive chart showing temperature trends for over 3,100 cities in 2015.

The UK’s Met Office habit of naming storms is likely little more than misguided hype.

Some nice videos of climate scientists briefly discussing climate change.

A very important read from Climate Central. “What Scalia’s Death Means For Climate Change.” Like it or not, climate change has become as much a foreign & domestic policy issue as much as it is science.

A good read by Chris Mooney on where our Earth’s the most vulnerable regions to big swings in climate.

Two years ago, a large, inexplicable hot patch of water appeared in the Pacific Ocean, and stayed right through the seasons—until now. Referred to as “the Blob,” it’s gone away, taken by El Niño. Will it return?

Speaking of El Niño, it has passed its peak strength but impacts will continue according to the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO)

 My fellow lightning aficionados will enjoy this read. Lightning-produced ozone has been detected…and this could be important to air quality assessment and prediction in the future.

The University of Miami just opened a new research facility that, by creating a “hurricane in a box,” can help us prepare for dangerous and potentially cataclysmic storms.

An amazing view of ice shattering like plates of glass on North American’s Lake Superior.

THE QUIXOTIC

“Hairy Panic,” a fast growing tumbleweed with a name straight out of a third-rate horror flick rolls into an Australian city.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For January 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope the new year is off to a good start for all of you. So far this year, at least for most of North America, it’s been a relatively tranquil winter. El Nino is still a big player on a larger scale, many of its effects are yet to be seen. There’s plenty of good news on the renewables front with wind power in particular taking a lot of steam out of the fossil fuels.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Of interest to users of the Windows OS. “Windows 8, Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, and 10 (mostly) consigned to the dustbin of history.”

Sometimes going offline is the best way to spend your time. I take regular breaks from the “online” world and highly recommend them!

PHYSICS

This has the potential to be big in the world of physics. “Rumors are rippling through the science world that physicists may have detected gravitational waves, a key element of Einstein’s theory which if confirmed would be one of the biggest discoveries of our time.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Say “Hello” to the Titanosaur, a species that may be the largest dinosaur ever discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very nice primer on fracking…explained plain and simple.

This was inevitable, and completely justified. “Oklahoma Residents Sue Earthquake Companies Over Earthquake Damage.”

A look at an underrated health hazard. “Shock figures to reveal deadly toll of global air pollution.”

An interesting look at the geology/climate connection. “Growth rings on rocks give up North American climate secrets.”

Ah, the good old days…they weren’t really all that good.

There are only five countries than can be held responsible for up to sixty percent of the plastic pollution in our oceans.

Here’s some awesome renewables news. “Wind power supplied 97% of electricity needs of Scottish households in 2015.”

Even in an oil state like Texas, wind power is making it’s mark and setting records.

If you live in an urban environment and ever needed a reason to plant a tree or two (or a dozen), here’s your excuse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A long-awaited upgrade will triple the forecasting computing power of the USA’s National Weather Service.

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on Hurricane Alex, a rare January, 2016 tropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

Here’s an impressive view of Hurricane Alex from NASA.

Could the ongoing El Nino lead to a below average number of tornadoes across the USA for 2016?

Not so long ago, the ozone hole was the talk of the atmospheric sciences. What happened to it?

There’s a strong correlation between the recent record breaking floods and rains in the UK and climate change.

A list of ten climate related records that you don’t necessarily want to have broken.

JUST FOR FUN

As the saying goes, “When In Rome…” Or, in this case, my beloved Sweden in winter... 🙂

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Jan. 4 – 12, 2016

If the December, 2015 holiday season seemed tepid in the Northern Hemisphere, you weren’t imagining things. It was an unusually warm December across much of North America with heavy rains and even deadly tornadoes making their appearance late in the month. But, the USA wasn’t the only area effected by significant weather events as 2015 drew to a close. Many parts of the UK were dealt a hefty blow by devastating floods. On the brighter side, with COP21 having wrapped up, the countries of our humble home now have a template to go by in regards to climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Astronomy fans will love this amazing image of the universe that captures its often difficult to comprehend immensity.

For those with big egos and/or think that our human populated Earth is the center of mythological monotheism, here are seven incredible facts about our universe that are worth serious consideration.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE/

Was the Christian Science Monitor trying for an interesting headline or are they seriously doubting overwhelming scientific evidence?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Check out these amazing satellite imagery of our humble home during December, 2015.

The 2015 USA wildfire season set a very ominous record.

This horrible mess on a beach in England has to be seen to be believed.

Recycling is always the way to go, but there can be challenging tasks that go with it.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A spot on read that calls the bluff of many an attention hungry “mediarologists. “Don’t Trust An Internet Snowstorm Forecast More Than A Week Into The Future.”

The climate and biosphere of Antarctica aren’t easy to study. Here’s an interesting read on the mystery of Antarctica’s clouds.

Clouds play a bigger role in the melting of the Greenland ice sheet than was previously assumed.

While on the subject of ice, giant icebergs have shown to be effective at removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

If December, 2015 seemed unusually warm for many of you in the USA, you weren’t imagining things.

According to Met Office data, December, 2015 was the wettest month on record for the UK.

The current El Nino may have peaked in some respects, but it’s far from over.

In spite of conclusive and overwhelming evidence, the climate change denial machine ticks on. “The conservative thinktanks under the microscope are the main cog in the machinery of climate science denial across the globe, pushing a constant stream of material into the public domain.”

THE QUIXOTIC

Sound scientific evidence be damned! When a nefarious opportunist has enough money and clout to throw their weight around, they can afford to say, “The laws of the land don’t apply to me.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

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