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Tornado Quest’s Science Week In Review For January 13 – 23, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to the week and the weather is being kind to you no matter where you are. We’ve just had a three day round of severe weather in the southeastern states of the USA including a High Risk on 22 January 2017. A High Risk is very rare, and even more so in January which is a month that’s not known for severe weather or tornadoes. Unfortunately, there’s a considerable amount of damage from Mississippi to Georgia with a number of fatalities. Simultaneously, the northeastern states dealt with a ‘nor’easter’ and California had an unusual amount of rain. It eased the drought conditions that have plagued that state for years, but won’t help much on the long run. This week’s review was delayed several days by the severe weather events and other projects. My next review will be published this Saturday, 28 January 2017. There’s quite a bit to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Who will lead NOAA and, ultimately the National Weather Service, during the Trump administration? This is something to watch very, very carefully.

Due to the lack of American lawmakers who have a sound scientific literacy, it has become increasingly important that scientists become more involved in the political process.

SCIENCE EDUCATION/CRITICAL THINKING

Pseudoscience is as rampant as ever in our modern day culture and, due to the proliferation of social media, is now more easily distributed to an unwary general public. To put it more succinctly…”This means that just because something catches our attention, or is easy to remember, it does not mean it is useful for understanding a new thing we want to learn.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out this very cool citizen science project that anyone can take part in. The awesome folks at Science Friday have a nice overview of how folks just like you can help out in year-long bird counts.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

How we process information (and where we get it) has much to do with how we interpret the validity of news…and decide on its validity…even if it’s fake and/or of dubious integrity.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read on how the universe could contain ten time more galaxies than previously thought.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Is the USA state of Wyoming trying to outlaw clean energy? If so, they’re cutting off their nose to spite their face.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read on severe weather High Risks and associated tornadoes that puts this past week’s severe weather into a historical perspective.

Speaking of tornadoes, is it really that cold inside a tornado? A new study on the tornado vortex says it is cold…very cold.

Since satellite monitoring of sea ice began in the 1970’s, the area of oceans covered by sea ice is at an all time low. Chances are good it’s the lowest it has been for many a millennia.

global-sea-ice-extent-2016The dark burgundy colored line in this NSIDC data graph represents sea ice in 2016. Note how it is far below other lines going back to 1978. Also note that the red line on the far left, representing 2017 to date, is even lower than 2016.

While on the subject of sea ice, take a few minutes and watch this fascinating and well produced video on climate change and its effects on glaciers in Alaska, USA.

Here’s a very good and thought-provoking read from meteorologist Brad Panovich. “It’s Time We Move On From A 0% & 100% Climate Change Debate.”

In case you missed it, “At the exact hour when the presidency transferred hands, the Obama administration’s climate and energy web pages became some of the first casualties of the new Trump administration.”

If the new presidential administration ignores climate change, China is more than willing to step up to the plate and become the world’s leader in climate science.

From a global perspective, some are of the opinion that we’ve almost lost any chance to stave off the effects of climate change. Personally speaking, I’m more optimistic, but we’ve no time to waste on getting the job started…and not letting any one industry or government…get in the way of science.

Fortunately, scientists are reminding citizens of the USA that science has been and always will be a major cornerstone of a civilized, intelligent, educated, and technologically advanced society.

WEATHER SAFETY

Here’s a great read from the American Red Cross on safety travel tips for cold weather conditions.

In light of the recent severe weather events and tornadoes, here’s a quick reminder from the National Weather Service on the difference between a Tornado Watch & a Tornado Warning.

difference-between-tornado-watch-and-warning.

Last but not least, some good news. NOAA’s new GOES-16 satellite is fully functional and is sending back some amazing high-resolution images of the Earth. This is truly a watershed event in the atmospheric sciences!

That’s a wrap for this review! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Have a great week everybody…see you Saturday!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For January 3 – 13, 2017

Greetings everyone! This has been a wild weather week across much of the western USA with California getting tons of snow, more than enough rainfall to put a dent in much of the drought stricken areas, and even an EF-0 tornado near Sacramento. Much of the midwest is bracing for an ice storm and, as of this date (13 January 2017) Ice Storm Warnings are in effect from the northeast Texas panhandle across Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and even into west-central Illinois. As usual, there’s a plethora of other topics to cover. On a personal level, it’s been a “full dance card” week for me with many projects that led me to delay this week’s post. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Excellent read from American Scientist magazine on nurturing scientific literacy among the general public. What is meant by ‘scientific literacy?’

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating story of a man who, in search of a quiet existence in a remote area, inadvertently had a significant effect on climate change science.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read about researchers getting the first look at a very rare kind of galaxy.

A recent study found evidence that the Earth’s moon is older than scientists thought…millions of years earlier than previously believed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An idea that, for the sake of our future generations, should come to fruition. “How To Save $23 Trillion Per Year: 100% Renewable Energy For The World.”

Good advice to get the new year started off right. “All too often environmentalism is about stopping doing something, but maybe it’s time to be more active and start doing something instead?”

As of late, the air pollution in China has literally become lethal in nature. This article explains why their air pollution is on the rise again.

China isn’t the only country struggling with severe air pollution problems. Just five days into 2017, London has breached its annual air pollution limit.

Those of us in Oklahoma know all too well what Trump’s EPA nominee Scott Pruitt is capable of. Now, the rest of the country has the chance to find out for themselves.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting read on a study that says the frequency of large-scale tornado outbreaks is increasing in the USA, particularly when it comes to the most extreme events. A link to the original study is included.

Tornadoes in California? You bet. On 10 January 2017, the Sacramento area was visited by an EF-0 tornado.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows over 20% of the contiguous USA is experiencing drought conditions. Recent rain and snowfall throughout the southern states should provide relief that will be evident on the next Drought Monitor.

c1axvprxaaa0ot7-jpg-large

There’s often a great deal of confusion about winter weather advisories, watches, and warnings. This NWS infographic has got you covered.

winter-weather-watch-warning-advisory-infographic

Are you prepared for an ice storm? If you’re in the areas under an Ice Storm Warning, all the preparations in this info-graphic (courtesy of the St. Louis, MO National Weather Service) should be rushed to completion.

are-you-prepared-for-an-ice-storm

While it may sound bizarre, you can have a blizzard even when it’s not snowing.

In 2016, a total of 121 flood related deaths occurred in the USA. This map from the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center gives a state-by-state breakdown. High death tolls in West Virginia were due to June floods, Texas deaths from flooding in late May.

2016-usa-flood-deaths-map

Just when you thought the new year couldn’t get off to a more bizarre start. “House Science Committee’s Twitter Account Is Now Just Another Climate Science Denial Troll.”

While not necessarily representative of the whole of American society, this survey gives an informative ‘snapshot’ of the daunting challenges atmospheric scientists are up against when trying to convey climate science to the general public.

Another challenge is conveying the risk of climate change to the public. A recent World Economic Forum report ranks climate change and associated environmental factors as the greatest risk facing humanity.

Here’s a disconcerting ‘must-read’ on the anti-science crusade that continues to build steam in the USA. “The Congressional Attack On Science.”

A concise overview from the Capital Weather Gang of ten extreme weather events outside of the USA that killed thousands and cost untold billions during 2016.

In the Antarctic, an ice shelf is breaking up from the inside out. The ice shelf is bigger than New York’s Long Island and when it breaks off, it could result in global sea level rise that threatens many large cities close to the world’s coasts.

THOUGHT PROVOKING

Last but not least, when asked about death and the ‘afterlife,’ astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson gives a spot on answer that is particularly enlightening.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For December 12 – 20, 2016

Greetings everyone! For those of you across North America, I hope you’re managing to stay warm during the current cold snap. It certainly adds a bit of ‘zing’ to the holiday season. Speaking of the holidays, this post and the following two will be on the brief side. It’s a crazy, busy time of year for many of us and I’m no exception. Still, there are important topics to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A wide variety of science fields are covered in this particular retrospective on the twelve key science moments of 2016.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

What’s the best way to communicate scientific concepts that are often very complex to the general public? “It turns out that even in the world of scientific writing, your eighth-grade teacher was right: how you write can matter as much as what you write.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news for astronomy fans. The world’s largest digital survey of the visible Universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

When the air quality in a city is so bad that airline traffic is cancelled, you know it’s air that is literally lethal to breathe.

Here’s an excellent read and infographic on reducing your plastic pollution. The plastics that are part of many life saving items aren’t the problem, it’s the “daily plastics” that aren’t always necessary and so easily discarded that are the challenge.

The Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association has released a “fact” sheet on waste water injection/fracking and it’s relation to the recent and dramatic increase of earthquakes in the Sooner State. For reasons that are blatantly obvious, they’re not taking responsibility for their actions. This is public relations cherry-picking at its best.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An unsettling read from Climate Central: Scientists Are Saving Climate Data; This Is Why It Matters. “In recent days, efforts have sprung up to archive climate data on federal sites. They’ve been spurred by fears that the Trump administration could take a hostile stance toward climate science and that budget cuts could make data less accessible.”

A very unsettling essay by climate scientist Michael E. Mann that is a “must read” for anyone interested in the atmospheric sciences. “I’m A Scientist Who Has Gotten Death Threats. I Fear What May Happen Under Trump.”

Here’s a look at NOAA’s global State Of The Climate report for November, 2016. First, let’s take a look at selected climate anomalies and events.

201611Here’s the global temperature trends for November. While much of North America was quite above normal, parts of Europe and Asia were unseasonably cool.

201612

After a very warm November in North America, 2016 had to get one last cold shot in before year’s end. Watching it take place across surface observations (especially the Oklahoma Mesonet) was quite a sight.

Finally, a rather impertinent view of the never-to-be-settled-argument on school closings and winter weather. In this game, you just can’t win, even when erring on the side of justifiable caution.


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you live. Autumn is beginning to make its presence known in parts of North America. As of this post, a very warm spell has settled over much of the southern and central Great Plains of the USA. It’s been a long, hot summer and I’m ready for some cool crisp mornings with a change in fall foliage color. The tropical Atlantic is rather active at this time. Fortunately, none of the systems that are being watched are a current threat to any land masses or populated areas. As usual, there’s plenty to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read where scientists answer twenty questions on the future of humanity.

Speaking of questions, here’s an excellent and very objective read by Lawrence Krauss on twenty questions for this year’s presidential candidates. “The net result? There is something here for everyone, because every view, no matter how inconsistent, is presented somewhere.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very good Psychology Today article from 2014 on the nature of the online troll. Considering recent events, it’s a read worth revisiting.

Do you use WhatsApp? Be prepared to share (unwillingly) a great deal of your private information with Facebook. There’s an opt-out, but personally speaking. I’d recommend you change over to Telegram.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A look at an interesting concept of the possible climate of Mars past…and how it could have led to its present day appearance.

No, Cupid didn’t make the “heart” on Pluto. It was something else far more interesting.

Don’t mess with the Milky Way. “Kamikaze galaxy explodes after diving into the Milky Way.”

From the BBC…from auroras to galaxies… a nice collection of spectacular imagery.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

New scientific ways of monitoring and predicting the affects climate change have on our ecosystems are coming to fruition.

Ghost Forests” are on the increase thanks in no small part to climate change. Unfortunately, this is a trend that will be on the upswing for some time.

Driven by climate change, large masses of trees across the USA are succumbing to diseases, insects, droughts, and wildfires.

Check out this nice “gif” of the USA’s growing use of wind power. Take note that the South has a lot of catching up to do.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Meteorologists with the National Weather Service (NWS) have a tough job with many daunting tasks and challenges. They need all the public and governmental support they can get. Your local National Weather Service office as well as other NWS social media accounts are the definitive source for all-important and potentially life-saving information.

An excellent comic that should put (temporarily) the kibosh on “the climate has always been changing” denier crowd.

Part climate science and part public policy in an interesting read on how climate adaptation can save money and improve the quality of life.

A very good climate read. “Why We Don’t Know If It Will Sunny Next Month But We Know It’ll Be Hot All Year.”

I could talk about this until I’m blue in the face. There is a distinctive difference in weather and climate. Hopefully, this short video will clear up the confusion.

Over a month after the devastating August, 2016 Louisiana floods, environmental and health concerns are growing along with anger among residents in the affected areas.

Flooding of low lying coastal areas in the USA due to sea level rise is no longer a theoretical concept.

And that’s a wrap up for this post! For my new followers in social media, I’d like to extend a warm welcome…I am quite active in other forms of social media and would really enjoy connecting and collaborating with other folks into the sciences.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links For May 9 – 16, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good start to your week. There have been multiple rounds of severe weather across North America in the past few days, unfortunately it also includes fatalities which occurred during tornadoes in Oklahoma. Due to reviews of recent severe weather events and the pending severe weather today across the Southern Plains, this post will be another brief one. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL SCIENCE

An interesting read on those “Eureka” moments that many of us have every so often.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Check out these amazing images from the Hubble telescope of the planet Mars.

Just as no two snowflakes are alike, no two spiral galaxies are alike.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very important question for current and future generations. Can cities be sustainable?

In many of the world’s most polluted cities, driving bans or restrictions are becoming commonplace.

Since the Paris climate agreement, cities and companies have pledged to fight climate change. What’s next?

On the positive side, more cities are becoming greener with renewable energy sources soaring through the roof.

Details on the commitments of the U.S. and the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) on further climate action after the Paris Agreement.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Take a look at a very compelling climate change visualization that speaks volumes.

When studying the atmosphere, there’s more to it than the adrenaline rush of severe thunderstorms. Here’s an excellent read on the important study of the link between the Earth’s atmosphere and biodiversity.

A fascinating read on pinpointing the timing of when oxygen first appeared in the earth’s atmosphere.

2016 continues to break global temperature records with April being the seventh hot month in a row.

As the Atlantic hurricane season approaches, the National Hurricane Center has released it’s list of names for the 2016 Tropical Cyclone season.  Capture 1

THE QUIXOTIC

Somehow I strongly suspect that if the genders were switched, this wouldn’t have been an issue. “Reporter forced to cover up on live TV because her dress was too revealing.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For February 29 – March 7, 2016

Greeting all! For my followers in the Northern Hemisphere, welcome to Meteorological Spring which began 1 March 2016. Winter still has much of a grip across parts of North America, Europe, & Scandinavia, but there are signs that warmer weather is on the way.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Are you using Windows 10? Here’s an interesting read on how Microsoft has beefed up Windows Defender.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Amazing astronomy news. “By pushing the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to its limits astronomers have shattered the cosmic distance record by measuring the distance to the most remote galaxy ever seen in the Universe.”

For those of us who are astronomy buffs and live in population centers, light pollution is one of the banes of our urban living existence.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

California’s water woes due to drought continue as a water mandate is extended through October, 2016.

Here’s some very good renewable energy news. “For The First Time, Solar Will Be The Top New Source Of Energy This Year.”

Are current technological developments improving air quality?

California’s drought woes continue with a shortage of mud being the latest challenge.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A very comprehensive and nicely done look at the USA’s significant tornado activity for 2016. What will the rest of the year bring? Time will tell, but as things look now, an “average” year is more than likely.

Speaking of tornadoes, a recent study says that “extreme” tornado outbreaks (i.e. 3 April, 1974, 27 April 2011, et al) are becoming more common.

Here’s a very intriguing idea in a recent study concerning forecasting tornadoes in the long-term.

In many areas across the USA, Severe Weather Preparedness Week’s are in full swing. Here’s a very comprehensive page from the National Weather Service on severe weather & tornado safety tips.

 A fascinating read on research into a common, but strangely elusive atmospheric phenomenon we know as lightning.

If you live in England or Wales and feel the current winter is warm, you’re right. In fact, the winter of 2015/16 is expected to beat records going back to the 17th century.

A very nicely detailed overview of why the February, 2016 global temperature spike is significant not only at the surface, but much higher in the atmosphere.

January and February 2016 set global temperature records. Depending on the data, it’s El Niño versus manmade climate change that’s responsible.

No easy answers in the public and political discourse regarding climate change. “As Warming Accelerates, Talk Of Climate Change Dissipates.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Dec. 29, 2015 – Jan 4, 2015

First and foremost, I’d like to wish all of my followers and readers a very Happy New Year! I hope the coming year brings you a wealth of new knowledge, good health, and a plethora of good times!

There’s a lot to be optimistic about in the coming year. In spite of ongoing obstacles, I’ve a strong intuitive sense that the best is yet to come for our generation and future ones.

This week’s post will have a few retrospective links taking a look back at various science stories of 2015…so on that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

From the American Association For The Advancement Of Science, a nice look back at their “best of 2015” science stories.

It’s hard to believe in 2016 that this is still and issue, but sadly it is. “Gender Equality In Science Will Require A Cultural Shift.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter has a new policy to ban hateful conduct, specifically terrorist groups.

A very disconcerting privacy and security read. “Recently Bought A Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Had Your Encryption Key.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Nice read on the Hubble telescope viewing the merger of two galaxies.

A fascinating retrospective. “‘Forgotten’ 19th Century Images of Eclipses, Stars, & Planets Found.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The “Quakegate” saga continues. Oklahoma State Rep on oil companies and earthquakes: “No one is taking this issue seriously.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In spite of some negatives, there were many positive environmental events during 2015.

A spectacular array of the top fifteen images of Earth from NASA taken during 2015.

More amazing NASA imagery of reading the English alphabet from space.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Hurricane Patricia is Climate Central’s image of the year. Considering the intensity of Patricia, it’s a sound choice!

A nice retrospective from Climate Central of their picks for the seven most interesting climate findings of 2015.

From Climate Reality, their take on the top climate moments of 2015.

Will 2016 be as warm as 2015? If the trend continues, the chances are good it will be as warm if not warmer.

A very thought-provoking read on four myths about how to deal with climate change.

El Nino may be responsible for havoc in some locations, but the folks in California see a positive side.

From Dr. Marshall Shepherd, a nice read on satellite vs. “ground” temperature readings.

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

For my fellow silent film fanatics…”The Most Risque Moments In Silent Cinema.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! See you folks next time!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links Feb. 18 – 25th, 2014

With the North American severe weather season fast approaching, the contiguous USA has just had its first widespread severe weather event. Fortunately, it appears that most damage was minor, tornadoes were not common, and straight line winds were the major hazard. In light of this severe weather episode, I’ve been asked a number of times, “What will the 2014 severe weather season be like?” Honestly, I haven’t a clue. There are many global atmospheric characteristics and trends that could give us a hint, but they’re not consistently reliable. The policy I recommend: Prepare for the worst & hope for the best. Knowledge is power…and make sure you have access to reliable and timely severe weather information. First, make sure your NOAA weather radio is functioning and you have plenty of batteries. Second, if you’re active in social media, follow your local National Weather Service office, your favorite local broadcast meteorologists, and any local officials/emergency management accounts. Now comes that waiting game.

Here are your links for this week…

GENERAL SCIENCE

This is something I’ve wondered about. “How Wrong Is Your Time Zone?”

For the mathematically inclined, formulae can thrill in the way that visual art and music do.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A good primer for those curious about astronomy: “Where Do Galaxies Come From?”

If clear skies are in your area, enjoy viewing Jupiter which, in a few days, will be at its highest point in the sky for many years to come.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

What’s causing the recent spike in unprecedented seismic activity in Oklahoma?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Parts of the UK have experienced devastating floods as of late. They’re now at a crossroads in adaption, or abandonment.

A sobering look at images at the horrible air pollution that plagues much of China.

We’re aware of the three R’s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, but what about Repair?

If we’re to take sustainability seriously, we need a clear vision of what a sustainable future will look like.

The spinning blades on wind turbines not only generate useful electricity, but in rare occasions…lightning

The recent loss of Arctic sea ice may have long-term effects that are greater than expected.

Some amazing imagery of the recent loss of snow-pack in California.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

When much of Moore, OK was devastated by an EF-5 tornado on 20 May 2013, the Plaza Towers Elementary become a deathtrap…not because of the tornadoes intensity, but due to shoddy construction.

The ongoing drought in California may have serious consequences concerning public health.

In spite of short-term cold spells and winter precipitation, January, 2014 was the fourth warmest January since records began in 1880.

JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT IT COULDN’T GET MORE WEIRD…

Giant walls built across the traditional ‘tornado alley’ can save the day!

Good news! The Farmer’s Almanac is spot on. Weird.

More bizarre histrionics from the climate change denialists. Apparently those they disagree with (including yours truly) are “global warming Nazi’s.”

Make no mistake about it. The climate denialist machine is well-oiled and well-financed.

Denialism means just that. Denying information or facts that have proven to be true. Being a skeptic is another matter!

Finally, an interesting read on the “shills, skeptics, and hobbyists lumped together in climate denialism.”

In closing, I’d like to add some objective sanity regarding the matter.

My point for posting the above articles is, save for the last one, to show an example of the bizarre antics that have taken place in the world of earth sciences.  I don’t enjoy the bitter vitriol any more than anyone else and DO NOT under ANY circumstances entertain or tolerate trolls or bullying…online or in person. The saddest point about the climate change discussion is the vitriol from denialists has sunken to a new sophomoric low that eradicates any sense of professionalism on their behalf. It’s the kind of childish “mud-slinging” that so often seen in political races. It’s also dismaying to see seemingly intelligent people create accounts in social media for one purpose: trolling those who disagree with them. Hopefully, this will be a self-correcting phase and many of the bullies will disappear when they realize they are truly persona non grata in every sense of the phrase.

And as for the proposal to build walls that prevent tornadoes, well…that’s just pure bullshit.

Cheers!

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