Tag Archives: heat

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 19 – 29, 2016

Greetings everybody! I hope everyone’s having a good week and, if you’re dealing with the heat wave covering a good portion of North America, you’re staying cool and comfortable. For much of the USA, drought conditions are spreading and even include many northeastern states. For folks into citizen science, there’s news regarding the mPING app. And, as usual, there’s plenty of climate data to keep up with…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re using an older version of the mPING app, please update so your important weather reports will work with the updated database. If you’re not familiar with mPING, it’s a great way for citizen scientists to report weather events to the National Severe Storms Laboratory to help with their research. The mPING app is free, takes up very little space on your smart phone, and is available for both iOS and Android.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter finally dealt a blow to one if it’s most offensive users. Let’s hope this isn’t a one-time publicity stunt.

Twitter is also regrouping in an effort to attract new users in order to, “help people to understand that Twitter isn’t really a Facebook-like social network where you connect with friends and family (thank goodness for that!) nor a place where you have to show up and tweet every day.” For severe weather information, Twitter is “hands-down” the best social media platform to receive severe weather watch and warning information…so long as you follow official media and National Weather Service accounts.

Trolls are an ever-present irritant in the online world, but there are ways to soundly destroy them…and it’s not that difficult.

An incredible technology and aeronautical achievement has just been completed. A solar-powered aircraft had circled the globe!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read on why we need to remember the Apollo moon landings.

The red spot storm on Jupiter has been observed for hundreds of years. The air in its thunderstorms boil at temperatures of of at least 2400°F (1300°C).

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that the DSCOVR satellite has been orbiting the Earth for over a year, its EPIC camera has finally captured enough images for a year-long time-lapse video of our home.

Thanks to climate change, wildfires in the USA have burned over 2.6 million acres so far this year…and there’s more to come.

California isn’t the only state in the US that is currently ravaged by drought. The northeastern states are in the grips of dry conditions as well.

A novel idea that’s worth looking into. If you’ve got an overabundance of CO2, get more giant trees.

For those who have the daunting task for forecasting flood events, climate change just changed the rules they must play by.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

We all need weather forecasts available on our mobile devices. The National Weather Service has you covered for your summer vacation…and year round.

Weather Ready Graphic

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Do You (Or Your Meteorologist) Understand What 40% Chance Of Rain Means?”

For the next three months (August, September, and October, 2016), NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center’s outlook is for above average temperatures for the contiguous forty-eight states and Alaska.

We’re only in late July and, according to data from NOAA and NASA, 2016 is already shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures.

With 2016 shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures, here’s an important look at many USA cities which are bound to set records of their own.

A new NASA-led study finds that almost one-fifth of the global warming that has occurred in the past 150 years has been missed by historical records due to quirks in how global temperatures were recorded.

A very informative read on how climate models are accurately predicting ocean and global warming.

Part health, part weather…a good read on keeping the human body cool during a heat wave. Your life could depend on it.

While on the topic of heat and the human body, here’s a comprehensive list of seven misconceptions about heat and humidity. Chances are you believe in some of them.

An interesting map of the climate worries that are (most likely) in the USA’s public mind…state-by-state.

An interesting read on one of the more enigmatic lightning related phenomenons in meteorology: ball lightning.

Yet another media-hype unscientific term has infiltrated itself into mass media and the colloquial dictionary. Welcome to the “heat dome.”

Finally, a look at the best arguments that climate change denialists can devise. From the article, “These are the publishing climate scientists who argue that something other than humans is responsible for the majority of global warming, although their explanations are often contradictory and don’t withstand scientific scrutiny.” The flat-earth society is still alive and well.

That’s a wrap for this post!

One last note; due to ongoing commitments to many other projects, this blog post will now be published on Friday. I’d also like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! All of Tornado Quest’s social media links can be found below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! If it’s hot in your location, I hope you’re keeping cool and comfortable. Here in the southern plains of the USA, we’ve got quite a heat wave thanks to a large dome of high pressure that’s parked itself over the region. Buckle up and enjoy the ride, this is going nowhere soon. Recent trends show much of the severe weather activity is occurring in the northern plains which is the climatological norm. Before we begin, I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There’s plenty of interesting reads in many areas, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA is racing to finish a new Mars rover, and the mission just got a launch and land date. The new rover will leave Earth by August 2020, and in February of 2021, it will hit the surface of the Red Planet to search for signs of life.

In this research project, the thick clouds that cover Venus are no hindrance to exploring the surface of the planet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A bizarre yet fascinating look at what happens when lava swallows a tree.

An interesting read on how some San Andreas fault earthquakes in the western USA can be triggered by the gravitational forces of the sun and Earth’s moon.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. The largest offshore wind farm in the USA could be coming soon to New York, if the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) approves the project as expected.

This is only bound to get worse. The largest freshwater lake in Florida, USA is covered in a scum of blue-green algae which is also traveling down nearby waterways and out to the coastline. Unfortunately, Florida’s current governor has done nothing in the past to prevent this environmental mess.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A big “Congratulations” to Jim Cantore who’s celebrating thirty years at The Weather Channel!

An excellent read that’s worth a re-post. “Meteorologists shouldn’t just ‘stick to the weather,’ they should openly discuss climate change.”

Is climate change truly here to stay? Yes…and here’s a list of seven (of many more) reasons why.

The true power of many becoming one can be invaluable. “Thirty-One Top Scientific Societies Speak With One Voice On Global Climate Change.”

Are the potential health dangers of climate change enough to make the public sit up and take notice? By some accounts, the answer is in the affirmative.

In order to reach climate goals & the 2°C (3.6°F) threshold, new technology is needed ASAP.

Unfortunately, billion dollar weather and climate disasters are becoming more commonplace…and it’s not because of inflation.

For those of us who live in large urban areas, this is no surprise. USA cities are becoming dangerously hot during our scorching summers.

You’ve probably been enjoying this year’s El Niño without realizing it. If your weather as of late has been pleasurable, hopefully you enjoyed it while it lasted.

Have you ever wondered how a NOAA National Weather Service office layout is setup? Here’s some fine examples.

Why are Swedes happy about a 25C “heatwave?” Simple…those kind of temperatures are rare in Scandinavia…even in the middle of summer.

Thanks a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For May 24 – 31, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I’m glad you stopped by. If you’re celebrating Memorial Day in the USA, I hope you had a nice holiday weekend. This past week has been a busy one across the USA’s Great Plains with repeated rounds of severe weather, hence the fact that this post, like most others this time of year, is on the brief side. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought provoking read on gender inequality within the science community. Family or science: women shouldn’t have to choose.

SOCIAL MEDIA

By some accounts, Facebook “may” be a good source of news, but for potentially life-saving severe weather information, Twitter slaughters Facebook hands down.

Sometimes it can be difficult to determine if content is appropriate for social media. If you have any reason for uncertainty, here are five questions to ask yourself before clicking that “post” button.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The concept of biodegradable plastics may sound good, but the devil’s in the details.

Here’s some very good renewable energy news. “The World’s Largest Floating Wind Farm Will Be Operational Next Year.

An excellent read on a decade-long study that shows how air pollution contributes to the frequency of heart disease.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Only time will tell but for now, preliminary NOAA data hints at a near “normal” 2016 Atlantic hurricane season.

Got air conditioning? Another NOAA seasonal outlook doesn’t paint a pretty picture for the summer ahead.

A very cool read on NASA scientists and research into creating digital hurricanes.

Given the chance, kids can ask good questions regarding climate change.

Interesting read on meteorologists taking note of climate change and how it’s affecting weather.

Yahoos will be yahoos and haters gonna hate. This article has blessed me with more hilarious ad hominin sophomoric vitriol from storm chasers than any other Twitter post this month. “Are ‘Tornado Selfies’ selfish and tactless?”  The toddler tantrums leveled at me as of  late are absolutely precious.

THE QUIXOTIC

In case you missed the recent “sweatergate” incident, here it is in all it’s glory.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media…glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 21 – 28, 2016

Greetings and welcome to all. I hope everybody’s having a great week and ready for April to take front and center. Hard to imagine that three months of 2016 have already passed. As the saying goes, time flies when you’re having fun…so make 2016 your year for personal growth…and make sure to nurture the kind of things in your life that money can’t buy. Those are truly the most valuable. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Can science fair participation bring about future educational and career success? Absolutely!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An ugly scenario. “A Nightmarish Timeline Of What Would Happen To The Earth After A Massive Solar Flare.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

How much energy could the USA get from solar? Far more than we are now…and now it the time to go full throttle.

Based on Met Office data, the UK’s plant growing season is a month longer than it was in 1990.

While we’re in the UK, its beaches have seen a dramatic (and unfortunate) rise in the amount of beach litter…most of which could be easily recycled.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With adaptation being the key to survival, California is finding ways to take the lead in fighting climate change.

A very thought-provoking read on proposals that are aimed at dealing with climate change.

With mounting evidence increasing by the day, meteorologists are now overwhelmingly concluding that climate change in indeed real and caused by humans.

Interesting read on cloud droplet research and its potential to influence climate models.

This is a great idea and badly needed to prevent unnecessary and completely preventable deaths from heat exposure that occur every year.

That’s a wrap for this post!

I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Feb. 22 – 29, 2016

Greetings to all! I hope everyone’s had an enjoyable week. Across North America, winter is winding down to a certain degree, but not without a recent spate of severe weather that, unfortunately, left several fatalities from tornadoes from Louisiana to Virginia over a two-day period. In spite of the calendar saying it’s still “winter,” severe weather knows no season…and there’s a plethora of examples of how severe thunderstorms and tornadoes can occur in the United States from January 1st to December 31st. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

An excellent read on the hazards of the online world. “Your Virtual Friendships Come With Privacy Risks.”

A very interesting look at ten surprising ways NASA technology has improved our standard of living and life on Earth.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An intriguing read on astronomers narrowing the search for “Planet Nine” in our solar system.

Check out this spectacular NASA video of a year in the life of our Sun.

A spectacular look at the rings of Saturn.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In North America’s driest place, millions of yellow flowers are blanketing parts of Death Valley.

Which country has the worst air pollution? The answer surprises many people.

Bra gjort, Norge! 🙂 “Norway announces plans for Europe’s largest onshore wind farm

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’ve not seen the new NOAA website, take a look. It’s very, very nice!

Do you have a new NOAA weather radio with Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME)? Here’s a list of state-by-state SAME codes for you to help with programming.

Interested in becoming a Skywarn spotter for your local National Weather Service? Here’s what you need to know.

Speaking of learning about weather, here’s a nice beginner’s page on reading synoptic weather charts.

A spectacular video of a trio of waterspouts over Louisiana’s Lake Pontchartrain on 23 February 2016.

Heat waves that were, back in the day a rare occurrence, could become the annual norm.

A look at climates past and present. The ice on Antarctica could be headed for a major meltdown.

Another very interesting look at the comparisons of climates past and present.

As tropical cyclone Winston weakened in the Pacific, NASA took some amazing views of a very potent storm.

Unfortunately, it’s not science that frequently guides acceptance or rejection of climate science.

For many denialists, this is the modus operandi. “What’s the easiest way to show the world isn’t warming? Simple: ignore the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels.”

Another example of climate denialism run amok as West Virginia, USA lawmakers push hard to block new science standards in schools.

Sadly, the climate change denialists that I referred to in the two previous posts will gladly stick their heads in the sand when faced with a case for optimism on climate change.

Last but definitely not least, here’s some potentially life-saving information on flood safety from the National Weather Service. Remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

CcB9szrW8AApdSV.jpg large

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For June 24 – July 4, 2015

If you’re celebrating the United State’s Independence Day at home or abroad, I hope you have a great holiday. As is so often the case, this is prime time across much of North America for heat and more than a few rogue thunderstorms that can throw a wrench into holiday plans. Due to the holiday, this will be a short version of the weekly links post…but I wanted to pass along some information that I hope will be of use and/or interest to you.

For your consideration, here’s this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A thought-provoking read from The New Yorker: “An Epidemic Of Reason?

A timely read for the Independence Day holiday. “Is The Declaration of Independence A Scientific Paper? Technically…yes.

TECHNOLOGY

A look back and the long, strange trip through advancements in technology within the United States.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project where you can help find out if climate change has made the western USA drought worse than it should be.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Monitor shows vast improvement across almost all of the USA…except for California of course.

Finally…if you’re celebrating Independence Day outdoors, NOAA has some heat safety rules that are very important for you and your friends and family.

As I stated earlier…if you’re celebrating…have a safe and happy holiday!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For June 16 – 24, 2015

With the arrival of the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere, the summer heat has arrived over much of the southern contiguous USA with a vengeance. In mid to late June, we’re already dealing with triple digit heat indices. It’s probably safe to say that the severe weather season, with a few exceptions, is a done deal for the traditional tornado alley. Oddly enough, the epicenter of severe weather shifted to the northern plains, Great Lakes, and south-central Canada unusually early this year. The Pope’s message on climate and the environment has been big news…and should be. While not perfect, it’s a step in the right direction.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If you’ve never watched This Week In Science, be sure to check out their YouTube channel. Dr. Kiki Sanford and company have a plethora of cool science topics every week. I’ve watched TWIS for years and highly recommend it to anyone of all ages who has an interest in anything and everything science.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Oklahoma is on a pace to break its earthquake records of years past. Shake, frack, and roll.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

New NASA data shows the world’s largest underground aquifers, which are a source of fresh water for hundreds of millions of people, are being depleted at alarming rates.
As an avid recycler, I’ve learned to avoid plastic as much as possible. It’s not easy, but we all have to deal with it…often involuntarily.
Here are six good reasons to either avoid or recycle plastic as much as possible.
A “tip-of-the-hat” to Mom’s Clean Air Force for their recent Father’s Day article, “Five Ways Dad’s Can Fight For Clean Air.”Speaking of clean air, the pollution in Chile has been so bad as of late that a “pollution emergency” was declared in Santiago.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This week is Lightning Safety Week in the USA. Here’s some “bookmark-worthy” safety information from the National Weather Service.

The latest US Drought Monitor map shows the drastic reduction in drought conditions for the southern plains. Unfortunately, conditions for California have been static.

Summer has arrived with a vengeance across the south and southern plains states. Climate Central takes a look at how summers since 1970 have compared to one another.

The Pope’s recent encyclical on the climate and environment has stirred many reactions…including some who find it a bitter pill to swallow.

While the Pope’s encyclical was a good start, Lawrence M. Krauss adeptly points out its shortcomings.

Economics and climatology may seem strange bedfellows, but there is a connection.

Here’s a very thought-provoking read on the complexities and problems in ranking climate data and statistics. “Is Second Place Really First Loser?”

A bizarre National Weather Service restructuring program has been shelved (for the time being) and in its place is something beneficial and life-saving…NWS severe weather communication.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

This week in social media: Tornado Quest on About Me

 

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More: Sept. 7 – 14, 2014

To date, a rather tranquil weather week across most of North America save for some snowy weather in parts of Alberta, Canada and the northern plains of the contiguous USA. As for the tropics, Hurricanes Edouard and Odile are front and center.

Due to time limitations, this post is a bit on the brief side. I’ve several projects with deadlines that have given me a full dance card.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

In our contemporary socio-political climate, being a scientist is difficult enough to make some give up.

TECHNOLOGY

Here are some very handy tips on keeping your data safe while traveling…or even going about your daily routine.

Firefox has had a few changes recently. Here’s some more info. It’s my browser of choice that I can’t recommend highly enough.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Finally! “Citizen Science” is now in the Oxford English Dictionary!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Sweden is now recycling up to 99% of their garbage.

Can moisture from clouds be channeled back to earth to be used for drinkable H2O and electricity generation? It’s worth a try.

Do you really need to rinse your recyclables? Actually, yes you do. Anything is better than sending them to the local landfill.

Can a house handle the Wisconsin winter and use less energy than a hair dryer to stay war? Check it out.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

After viewing this video, I can’t help but wonder if the individual in question (1) knew there was an approaching tornado and (2) realized just how close they were to being seriously injured or killed. Check out this close encounter.

Thanks to the Montreal Protocol, some studies hint at an improvement in the Earth’s ozone layer.  While the ozone layer news is good, that doesn’t negate the importance of ongoing climate change.

NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center has a review of the climate events of August and summer of 2014.

Here’s a concise overview of NOAA’s new radar upgrade called SAILS which will help improve forecasts and warnings.

Weather satellites do more than just take pretty pictures of clouds.

Many of us talk about the dangers of heat and cars until we’re blue in the face. “If You Need Scientific Proof Never To Leave Your Dog In The Car, Here It Is

Finally, I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new social media followers. I’m glad you’re along! Also, special thanks to the many folks who have re-tweeted or mentioned me this past week. I appreciate your kindness a great deal.

Have a great week everyone…

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links For May 20 – 27, 2014

This is traditionally a very busy time for me with many projects calling for attention as well as some very active weather…so this will be a very abbreviated post. If time allows, I may add a few links later in the week.

Here are this week’s links for your consideration…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

After many decades in citizen science, I can tell you it’s anything but weird and wild…but it’s certainly in it’s golden age with unbridled curiosity…and nothing but good things can come from that.

Popular Science has a list of 5 apps for a very cool citizen science summer.

If you’re into astronomy and citizen science, your help is needed in evaluating images from the Spitzer space telescope.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Apparently, Dimetrodon is not a dinosaur. The child paleontologist in me is crushed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Here’s a fascinating site from the USGS that shows the location of wind farms across the USA!

Across the Atlantic, Sweden is set to take the lead in Nordic wind power.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For the northern hemisphere, summer is on the doorstep. Summer heat kills more people every year that tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning, et al. combined. Here’s some very important information on this “silent killer.”

The Oklahoma and Texas panhandles, like many regions, are taking a shellacking from an relentless drought.

NOAA’s Carbon Tracker is a fascinating tool. Here’s a look a the details.

A look at Europe’s next generation of weather satellites.

The World Meteorological Organization is taking action on storm surges which kill more people that tropical cyclone winds or earthquake-generated tsunamis.

NOAA has issued their outlook (not a forecast) for the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season. Near normal or below normal number of tropical cyclones are expected. The caveat is the simple fact that it takes only one intense hurricane (i.e. Andrew) to devastate a region and cause billions in damage.

We’re at the 30th anniversary of the devastating Memorial Day flood in Tulsa, OK…the deadliest natural disaster in the city’s history. Here’s a look back from the Tulsa World and the Tulsa Nat’l Weather Service. To date, it’s the deadliest natural disaster in Tulsa’s history with 14 fatalities.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

Toasty Temps Bring New #Weather Hazards #okwx #kswx #txwx

May is finally here which means the peak month for tornado activity has arrived. It just so happens that the computer model forecasts are hinting at a rather quiet period for the southern plains. In the meantime, we’ve got several days ahead with well above average temperatures which bring their own hazards. Our bodies are not yet acclimated to the heat. Even the most active and athletic individual can fall victim to heat related illnesses very quickly. I’d like to pass along some helpful information that’s beneficial to have on hand.

Ultra Violet Radiation Awareness: Protecting yourself from UV rays is very important, even in quite mild & cool weather.

Summer Weather Safety and Survival: The NWS Norman, OK has put together a very nice page with a wealth of safety information including a Heat Index page.

Heat: A Major Killer: The “visually spectacular” weather events make the rounds on media but heat, which lacks the “sensationalism” of a tornado outbreak or hurricane, kills far more people each year than violent weather events combined. This page from the NWS is very comprehensive and explains many of the advisories that are issued by your local NWS office.

I hope this information is helpful to you and, regardless of where you live, it helps you stay safe in the sizzling summer days ahead.

Cheers!

 

 

 

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