Tag Archives: heatwave

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 19 – 29, 2016

Greetings everybody! I hope everyone’s having a good week and, if you’re dealing with the heat wave covering a good portion of North America, you’re staying cool and comfortable. For much of the USA, drought conditions are spreading and even include many northeastern states. For folks into citizen science, there’s news regarding the mPING app. And, as usual, there’s plenty of climate data to keep up with…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re using an older version of the mPING app, please update so your important weather reports will work with the updated database. If you’re not familiar with mPING, it’s a great way for citizen scientists to report weather events to the National Severe Storms Laboratory to help with their research. The mPING app is free, takes up very little space on your smart phone, and is available for both iOS and Android.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter finally dealt a blow to one if it’s most offensive users. Let’s hope this isn’t a one-time publicity stunt.

Twitter is also regrouping in an effort to attract new users in order to, “help people to understand that Twitter isn’t really a Facebook-like social network where you connect with friends and family (thank goodness for that!) nor a place where you have to show up and tweet every day.” For severe weather information, Twitter is “hands-down” the best social media platform to receive severe weather watch and warning information…so long as you follow official media and National Weather Service accounts.

Trolls are an ever-present irritant in the online world, but there are ways to soundly destroy them…and it’s not that difficult.

An incredible technology and aeronautical achievement has just been completed. A solar-powered aircraft had circled the globe!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read on why we need to remember the Apollo moon landings.

The red spot storm on Jupiter has been observed for hundreds of years. The air in its thunderstorms boil at temperatures of of at least 2400°F (1300°C).

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that the DSCOVR satellite has been orbiting the Earth for over a year, its EPIC camera has finally captured enough images for a year-long time-lapse video of our home.

Thanks to climate change, wildfires in the USA have burned over 2.6 million acres so far this year…and there’s more to come.

California isn’t the only state in the US that is currently ravaged by drought. The northeastern states are in the grips of dry conditions as well.

A novel idea that’s worth looking into. If you’ve got an overabundance of CO2, get more giant trees.

For those who have the daunting task for forecasting flood events, climate change just changed the rules they must play by.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

We all need weather forecasts available on our mobile devices. The National Weather Service has you covered for your summer vacation…and year round.

Weather Ready Graphic

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Do You (Or Your Meteorologist) Understand What 40% Chance Of Rain Means?”

For the next three months (August, September, and October, 2016), NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center’s outlook is for above average temperatures for the contiguous forty-eight states and Alaska.

We’re only in late July and, according to data from NOAA and NASA, 2016 is already shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures.

With 2016 shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures, here’s an important look at many USA cities which are bound to set records of their own.

A new NASA-led study finds that almost one-fifth of the global warming that has occurred in the past 150 years has been missed by historical records due to quirks in how global temperatures were recorded.

A very informative read on how climate models are accurately predicting ocean and global warming.

Part health, part weather…a good read on keeping the human body cool during a heat wave. Your life could depend on it.

While on the topic of heat and the human body, here’s a comprehensive list of seven misconceptions about heat and humidity. Chances are you believe in some of them.

An interesting map of the climate worries that are (most likely) in the USA’s public mind…state-by-state.

An interesting read on one of the more enigmatic lightning related phenomenons in meteorology: ball lightning.

Yet another media-hype unscientific term has infiltrated itself into mass media and the colloquial dictionary. Welcome to the “heat dome.”

Finally, a look at the best arguments that climate change denialists can devise. From the article, “These are the publishing climate scientists who argue that something other than humans is responsible for the majority of global warming, although their explanations are often contradictory and don’t withstand scientific scrutiny.” The flat-earth society is still alive and well.

That’s a wrap for this post!

One last note; due to ongoing commitments to many other projects, this blog post will now be published on Friday. I’d also like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! All of Tornado Quest’s social media links can be found below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links For Dec. 8 – 15, 2014

It’s no secret that the big weather news this week was the storm system that brought a great deal of rainfall to the west coast and specifically to the drought ravaged parts of California. While this may have helped take the edge off the ongoing drought, it’s only temporary. In fact, in the long-term, it’s unlikely that much benefit will be seen from this event. There’s plenty more to take a look at, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Just a reminder of the amazing free mPING app that you can get for iOS or Android. Whether its snow, hail, or high winds, you can send in a report to the National Severe Storms Laboratory and help weather research! The mPING app, unlike many other weather apps, has a very small footprint…so it won’t gobble up a ton of space in your mobile device.

Can citizen scientists lead the way in exciting new research? You bet they can.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY/RECYCLING

Check out one of the most novel ideas for recycling used Christmas trees I’ve seen to date.

If plastic doesn’t have a recycling number, what should you do with it?

Aside from not taking it for granted, what did Americans learn this year from not being able to drink their water?

An interesting infographic on which countries are the most energy efficient.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A recent Met Office study indicates heatwaves are likely “every other year” by 2030’s.

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center. It was a chilly November for the contiguous USA, but that was a global exception.

Six thought-provoking charts on the future of climate change.

A good read on the inextricable link between our atmosphere and biosphere.

A climate change denier ≠ skeptic. In fact, nothing could be further from truth in labeling. Hence, many scientists are encouraging journalists to stop referring to deniers as skeptics.

There’s a great deal of media coverage in the aftermath of the latest UN Climate Summit. Here’s a concise overview. Unfortunately, what was agreed upon has little teeth.

Oklahoma is known for tornadoes in the spring, but December? No month is immune. Oklahoma County recorded it’s first December tornado on 12/14/14. Tulsa County has experienced December tornadoes in 1975 (Dec. 5th) and two on Christmas Eve 1982 (Dec. 24).

Speaking of tornadoes, ustornadoes.com has compiled a “top ten” list of tornado videos of 2014. Please note that this is not an endorsement of storm chasing, “extreme” or otherwise, and the inevitable dangers chasers/spotters will encounter.

Interesting read from NASA on research into thunderstorm gamma rays.

What are your chances of a white Christmas in the contiguous USA? In my neck of the woods, slim to none.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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