Tag Archives: hurricane hunters

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For October 10 – 17, 2016

Greetings to everyone! I hope you’re all having a great start to  your week and the weather where you live is being kind to you. The big weather story this week is the ongoing flooding in parts of the southeastern USA, North Carolina in particular, that resulted from Hurricane Matthew. In climate science, substantial progress has been made with dozens of countries agreeing on pacts that will have a dramatic impact on the quality of life for every one of us. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…


A nice overview of the challenge of communicating science to the general public.

A fascinating take on the gender differences that are often perpetuated within the sciences. “Metaphorically Speaking, Men Are Expected To Be Struck By Genius, Women To Nurture It.”

A chilling segment broadcast on Science Friday on 14 October 2016 on the ‘dangers’ involved in scientific research.

A very thought-provoking essay and overview of four new books that, “one way or another, our planet is wilder and weirder than the rules we are used to would predict.”


Ozone is beneficial in the upper levels of our atmosphere. The opposite is true at ground level where humans and other life forms exist. While many effects of ozone are understood, more are being researched and, as our planet warms, concern is growing about the public health and environmental impacts of this toxic substance.

A unique solution to a renewable energy challenge. “Scotland region will be 100% powered by kites within a decade.”

You’d think that in this day and age, irresponsibility like this wouldn’t be an issue, but it is. “British Households Fail To Recycle A ‘Staggering’ 16 Million Plastic Bottles A Day.”


Ever wonder what it’s like to ride along with hurricane hunters? It’s not for the faint of heart. This video gives you an inside view.

If there’s a good chance of La Nina for North American in the coming months, how will it affect the coming winter?

Are you a storm chaser or have a particular interest in severe weather and tornadoes? Here’s a good read that should spearhead some of your own research into tornado genesis. “Wind Patterns In Lowest Layers Of Supercell Storms Key To Predicting Tornadoes.”

Simply put, this headline is spot on. “If Congress Invests In Seasonal Weather Forecast Research, Everybody Wins.”

Ever feel dismayed about overwhelming evidence on climate change? There’s no need to. Here’s a good viewpoint on how to “make lemonade out of climate change.”

Here’s an excellent Q & A from the Union Of Concerned Scientists regarding drought conditions that plague over 40% of the USA.

This is perhaps the biggest climate change news in quite some time. Over 190 countries have agreed to limit the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in the battle to combat climate change. It’s a very important step that is vital to the world we live in today…and for future generations.

A startling look at the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti with photos and maps.


Please show your support & wear Orange this Wednesday.

UNITY DAY: Together against bullying — united for kindness, acceptance and inclusion. Wednesday, October 19, 2016

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch


Tornado Quest Science Links And More For October 3 – 10, 2016

Greetings folks! I hope everyone’s having a good start to their week. Of course, the big story this week has been Hurricane Matthew which left hundreds dead in its wake and an untold amount of destruction. It was a stark reminder than, in spite of a nearly decade long “hurricane drought” for the USA, many areas are still as vulnerable (if not more so) as they ever were. With increasing real estate development and growing populations, hurricane prone areas are still in nature’s cross-hairs. As it is often said, it only takes one…and it doesn’t have to be a major hurricane making landfall over a major population area for significant amounts of damage to personal property, infrastructure, injuries, and deaths to occur. The temptation to flee the snow belt or the extremes of the Great Plains and live in a year round “clement climate” that is warm and conducive to sunbathing in winter is strong, but, depending on where you live, it comes with a price.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…


As I’ve discussed with many colleagues as of late, the attack on science isn’t just delegated to a few small regions, but has become a global menace. The challenge of communicating science to the public must be taken up by a science-savvy press and science educators among others.

Public misconceptions about many fields of study are common. Here’s an excellent overview of eight myths about the public’s view of science.

Communicating to the public about scientific topics can be risky, yet it can be done. “How Scientists Can Engage The Public Without Risking Their Careers.”


What’s next for Twitter? One of the biggest movers and shakers in social media is on rocky ground…and whoever buys it will determine its fate.


Americans are increasingly concerned about our environment even though a relatively small percentage of people surveyed are actively taking part in doing what they can to take better care of our humble home.

Well said. “If only we could see the air pollution around us we could identify the culprits and avoid exposure. From an early age we are taught not to drink dirty water or eat moldy food but we have less opportunity to avoid harmful air.”


The duties that are required of hurricane hunters are not for the faint of heart. This is a very tough job that often goes without thanks. This excellent video gives you a quick overview of what goes on in those violent storms.

Adding insult to injury. Rising temperatures due to climate change are “loading the dice” for a permanently dry southwestern USA.

A sobering read from Climate Central. “Carbon dioxide just hit its annual minimum at Mauna Loa Observatory and failed to dip below 400 ppm.”

On the brighter side, 191 countries have found a plan to let airlines grow without increasing their significant impact on the environment.

This explains a lot. “The Psychology Behind Climate Change Denial.”

Finally, on a positive note, there are many ways you can receive potentially life-saving weather advisories, watches, and warnings…and that includes all of your mobile devices. Here’s a helpful info-graphic from the National Weather Service with a quick overview.


For more specific information for your location, go to mobile.weather.gov ~ the good news is that as connected to information sources as we are today, almost everyone can get weather information 24/7.


Considering this comes from the Drudge report, I’m not at all surprised at its reprehensible, sophomoric rhetoric. Politicizing a weather event such as Hurricane Matthew is indeed, “deplorable.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!



Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Feb. 16 – 23, 2015

As of this post, several southern states in the USA have been given a stout taste of winter with all the frozen precipitation trimmings. Many folks, especially those living in the northeast, can’t wait for a taste of spring. Personally speaking, I’m relishing every minute of winter I can get. Soon enough, the brutal great plains summer heat will set in and we’ll be begging for a shot of cool air. As for the inevitable changes that occur and induce an increase in severe thunderstorm activity, they will be here soon enough. Once again I’d like to remind folks to prepare now for the coming uptick in severe weather season. The last thing you want to have happen is realize that you didn’t prepare a “safe place” as a tornadic supercell bears down on your town…or neighborhood. Last but not least, the amount of news concerning climate change has been on the increase as more and more research data confirms that planet Earth’s climate is indeed not what it used to be. On the hopeful side, there are some bright lights in sustainability and renewable energy news.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…


From the archives, a disconcerting read on data brokers and what they know about you.


Would be nice to see this come to fruition. “The Dutch Windwheel is not only a silent wind turbine – it’s also an incredible circular apartment building.”

Here’s some good news on the renewables front…in 2015, more than 10 percent of the electricity used in Texas came from wind turbines.

A very informative read on the indicators for measuring the sustainability of cities.

I’d gladly give one of these a test run! “Rollable solar charger provides portable green energy wherever you go.”


Yet another potentially volatile scenario indicating the strong link between our climate and biosphere.


Many folks, especially in the northeastern USA states, have had their fill of snow. Back in February, 2010, for a brief period all 50 states had snow somewhere within their state lines.

Clouds have a secret language all their own. Learn to “read” it fluently, and you’ll be leagues ahead of 99.9% of the world’s population.

The term “polar vortex” has been tossed about a great deal as of late. Here’s a basic explanation of what it really is.

NOAA’s National Climactic Data Center has their global analysis for January, 2015…and save for the eastern part of the USA, it was a warm month worldwide.

Speaking of a warm January, 2015 started off in global climate warmth where 2014 left off.

An interesting read on how tree rings can give scientists a look at climates past.

The hazards of winter weather aren’t just limited to slick roads. Here’s some good information from the CDC on winter weather safety.

As is the case with hurricanes, tornadoes, flash floods, etc., winter weather events can tally up a staggering toll in the billions.

A picture (in this case…a word cloud) is worth a thousand words…and gives insight into the chasm between climate science and climate science denial.

From DeSmog Blog: “With the news of Willie Soon’s fossil-fuel-funded career featured on the front page of The New York Times on Sunday, there’s no time like the present to take a look at all of Soon’s friends in the anti-science climate denial echo chamber.” While we’re hot on the trail, it appears that malfeasance “pal review” has been the modus operandi amongst deniers for years.

Many storm chasers like to brag about chasing “extreme” weather…but Antarctica would give all of them a run for their money.

Hurricane hunters that have no qualms about flying through a category 5 hurricane would never dream of flying through a supercell blasting across the Oklahoma prairie. Here’s why.

That’s a wrap for this post…


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