Tag Archives: hurricane

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For November 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather has been to your liking regardless of where you live. It’s been a tranquil November in the tropical Atlantic, but there’s still a possibility for development until late November and early December. The big news is the ongoing wildfires in California which, as of this post, have killed over two dozen people. We’ll look at those fires, plus many other topics. Let’s get started.

Photo credit: NASA

Last but not least, I’m continuing to share the Hurricane Preparedness link. Regardless of the month, it’s never to early or late to prepare. There is an area of interest as of 11 November 2018 in the Caribbean that bears watching. Tropical or subtropical cyclones in November are not unheard of…so best be prepared even if there’s a bit of a chill in the wind at your location.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. You an also prepare for next year any month of the year. We’ve a few more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Substantial hurricanes and tropical storms have occurred in November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season. This is also applicable to any weather event year round; winter weather, severe weather, etc.

Infographic courtesy NWS Wakefield, Virginia, USA

A quick note: Any advertising you see on this blog is from WordPress and not me. Hopefully within the next year, funding will be available to make some substantial changes and that will no longer be a necessary annoyance. I do apologize for any inconvenience.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a “Thank You” for my long-time followers! It’s great fun having all of you along! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, so am I…let’s connect!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 22 – 29, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Across much of North America, foliage is at its peak for the autumn season and that’s a very welcome sight especially in the wake of devastation left behind by Hurricane Michael. There are several weeks left in the Atlantic hurricane season and that’s plenty of time for more storms to form. Many other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

Once again this week, I’m sharing the Hurricane Preparedness link. Regardless of the month, it’s never to early or late to prepare.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. We’ve several more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Substantial hurricanes and tropical storms have occurred in October and November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season. This is also applicable to any weather event year round; winter weather, severe weather, etc.

Infographic courtesy National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia, USA

That’s a wrap for this post! Here’s a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a “Thank You” for my long-time followers! It’s great to have all of you along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, so am I…let’s connect!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 15 – 22, 2018

Greetings to one and all! For much of North America, the weather has been quite tranquil in recent days, which is a badly needed respite after Hurricane Michael devastated vast areas of several southeastern USA states. The true scope of damage and death toll is still unknown and months, if not years, of recovery are ahead. There’s plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

Image courtesy NOAA

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. We’ve several more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Substantial hurricanes and tropical storms have occurred in October and November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season. This is also applicable to any weather event year round; winter weather, severe weather, etc.

Infographic courtesty National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia, USA

That’s a wrap for this post! Here’s a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a “Thank You” for my long-time followers! It’s great to have all of you along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, so am I…let’s connect!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 8 – 15, 2018

Greetings to one and all! This has been an exceptional weather and climate week in every way. Hurricane Michael proved to be a devastating event in terms of damage…the scope of which we are just beginning to grasp the extent of less than a week after it is 10 October 2018 landfall on the Florida panhandle. In meteorological terms, it will rank as one of the top ten most powerful hurricanes to affect the USA. From very modest beginnings as a diffuse low pressure center on 2 October 2018, it grew into a cluster of thunderstorms east of Central America. Hurricane Michael then took advantage of optimal atmospheric conditions and unseasonably warm Gulf of Mexico water temperatures to intensify to a hurricane that was a high-end Category 4 storm. The latest IPCC UN climate report also got a considerable amount of attention and is certainly a subject that needs to be addressed immediately.

Hurricane Michael as a high-end Category 4 storm shortly before landfall on the Florida panhandle on 10 October 2018.

Hurricane Michael’s Eye Viewed From The International Space Station By NASA Goddard Space Flight Center From Greenbelt, MD, USA

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. We’ve several more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Major hurricanes have occurred in October and November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season.

Infographic courtesty National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia, USA

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a welcome to my new followers in social media and thank everyone who follows me! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Also, a heartfelt ‘thank you’ for my long-time followers. I appreciate all of you. If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below.

Until next time…stay safe and keep and eye on the weather.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 1 – 8, 2018

Greetings everyone! Big news week with the #IPCC report on climate change. Hurricane #Michael is also front and center with landfall forecast as a dangerous #hurricane on Wednesday 10 October 2018 somewhere on the Florida panhandle. I’ve included the link to hurricane preparedness info for those in its path…so let’s get started.

Image Credit: Lyndon State College from VORTEX2

The latest US Drought Monitor is out. Across the contiguous USA, the southwest is currently the region with the most widespread dry/drought conditions. Overall, approximately 55.4 million of the USA population is experiencing some degree of drought conditions as of 2 October 2018.

U.S. Drought Monitor

With Hurricane Michael now forecast to reach Category 3 hurricane intensity before making landfall in the USA’s eastern Gulf coast region on Wednesday 10 October 2018, here is the link to the hurricane preparedness info. Even without Michael in the scenario, we have several more weeks that could potentially be active for much of the Atlantic and Central/Eastern North Pacific.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who are preparing for Hurricane Michael and/or live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be with each week’s post until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for Michael, there’s still time but it’s running out fast. There’s also still time for many dangerous tropical cyclones to form and impact the Atlantic basin for several more weeks. Last but not least, here’s a reminder on how to manage your social media as a hurricane approaches.

Infographic courtesy National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my new followers in social media! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Also, a heartfelt ‘thank you’ for my long-time followers. I appreciate all of you. If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below.

Until next time…Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 24 – October 1, 2018

Greetings everyone! For much of North America, autumn has finally settled in with cooler temperatures and some color beginning to show in foliage. Both the Atlantic and eastern north Pacific have been very busy with numerous tropical cyclones…and several more weeks to go before the season begins to wind down. As usual, plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

Atlantic Hurricane Florence as viewed from the International Space Station as it approached the eastern USA coast.

The map below is a preliminary summary of the eastern north Pacific activity as of 1 October 2018. As you can tell, it’s been a very busy season.

Graphics courtesy NOAA’s National Hurricane Center

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be with each week’s post until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared, there’s still time. There’s also still time for many dangerous tropical cyclones to form and impact the Atlantic basin for several more weeks.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my new followers in social media! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Also, a heartfelt ‘thank you’ for my long-time followers. I appreciate all of you. If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below.

Until next time…Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 10 – 17, 2018

Greetings everyone! The big story this past week has been the tropical cyclone activity with Hurricane Florence taking center stage in North America. The flooding from Florence will be ongoing for some time. In addition to this week’s links, I’ve also included the Hurricane Preparedness Primer link. For the duration of the Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclone season, that will be available in each weekly post. Several other topics to cover this week, so let’s get started.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The USA’s EPA certainly isn’t what it used to be. “EPA Admits Scrapping Regulations Will Put More Methane Into Atmosphere.”

It will be interesting to see how well this ocean plastic cleanup project works. Perhaps the best solution to the environmental disaster of cleaning up plastic in our oceans is making sure it doesn’t get there in the first place.

While on the topic of ocean plastic cleanup, here’s a sobering read on just how lethal plastic is to the ocean’s sea turtles.

With North Carolina in the news due to Hurricane Florence, it can’t be helped that the state’s natural hurricane defenses were observed closely. Unfortunately, they’re disappearing.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

While published before Hurricane Florence made landfall in the USA, here’s a fascinating read on the challenges of gathering data on one of the atmosphere’s most violent storms.

Image courtesy NASA

Now that Florence has passed, it’s time to look over data collected at all phases of its life cycle. It’s also important to examine the role climate change took place with Florence and other tropical cyclones around the world. “A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster.”

The debate on the connection of climate change to hurricane frequency and/or intensity isn’t new, but is important to examine. Many facets of Hurricane Florence and other tropical cyclones can give us answers as to the threat level. By some accounts, Florence was a climatologically-amplified triple threat.

One of the monumental challenges of preparing for a hurricane is evacuating large numbers of people within the path. Here’s an interesting read on the task of getting people out of harm’s way.

When fully operational, this new NASA satellite that was just launched will give us an incredible amount of priceless data on ice sheet loss which not only affects sea level, but weather patterns.

Graphic source: NASA

Each season of the year has its own weather hazards…and autumn is no exception.

HURRICANE SAFETY

The tropical Atlantic may be much quieter than in the few days, but the possibility of future development will exist for many weeks. I’ve included the link to some infographics and links that are a good source of basic information. Storms like Florence should be a wake-up call for anyone who has not prepared for the possibility of being in the path of a very dangerous tropical cyclone.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

This page is not all-inclusive, but will give those in hurricane prone regions a starting point on preparedness.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my new followers in social media, I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below. 🙂

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science And Hurricane Prep Links For September 3 – 10, 2018 #Florence #Isaac #Olivia

Greetings everyone. This week’s post will have a few science links, but with Hurricanes Florence, Isaac, and Olivia in the picture, that changes everything. First and foremost, I’d like to share a post I’ve put together for hurricane preparedness.

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

The forecast for all current tropical cyclones will change several times a day as they are modified and more weather data is gathered. It’s prudent that anyone within the areas that could be affected stay on top of local National Weather Service forecasts and outlooks from the National Hurricane Center. As the situation evolves, the information on the Hurricane Preparedness post will be subject to change.

SOCIAL SCIENCE AND SCIENCE EDUCATION

Here’s a fascinating long-read. “Science Curiosity And Political Information Processing.” Bottom line…”science curiosity counteracts politically biased information processing.” To put it more succinctly, curiosity, critical thinking, the scientific method, and rationale overrule subjective, emotionally based reactions.

Libraries are an essential part of a high quality of life. Here’s an interesting essay on the difficulties libraries are facing in our digital age.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Unlike humans, CO2 doesn’t recognize political borders…and various countries across our planet are shipping carbon that contributes to climate change round the world.

This is a disconcerting issue that could happen across much of the USA. “As Climate Warms, Algae Blooms In Drinking Water Supplies.”

On positive note, here is some really good renewable energy news. The world’s largest offshore wind farm has just opened off the coast of northern England.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a look at the latest USA Drought Monitor which contains a summary of current dry and drought conditions across all fifty states.

By running from the anxiety associated with climate change, we’re not doing ourselves any favors. “How Can We Avoid Climate Avoidance?”

That’s a wrap for this post. If you’re in the forecast path of Hurricane Florence or any other active tropical cyclone, take as many hurricane preparedness steps you can take. Time is running out and if you are ordered to evacuate, please do. The life of your loved ones and you may depend on it. Stay safe!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

Even though it’s now into the latter weeks of the “official” Atlantic tropical cyclone season, I’d like to share a few hurricane preparedness links. There’s plenty of time in the Atlantic basin for tropical cyclone formation and major hurricanes have formed well into autumn. First, let me preface the rest of this post by saying that this list is not all-inclusive and not intended to be a source of information for potentially life threatening situations. Second, there are many sources of weather information and forecasts available. For the time being, it would be wise to stick with the National Hurricane Center and your local National Weather Service office. They will have the most up-to-date information you need. As your local situation changes, please also refer to the broadcast media meteorologists of your choice. Lastly, please don’t forget your NOAA Weather Radio. Weather apps may be all the rage, but many people across the USA tell me they vary a great deal in quality of information.

First, let’s take a look at some infographics. Following these graphics are links to sites for very important weather information, weather safety, and preparedness.

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS INFOGRAPHICS

A preparedness kit and protecting vital irreplaceable items and documents is crucial.

There are many ways to get information. NOAA weather radio, the broadcast media of your choice, and your mobile devices. Have multiple ways to get information in case one isn’t available.

There are a myriad of hazards in a hurricane besides wind.

Flooding is almost inevitable in most land-falling tropical cyclones. Please be aware of flood safety rules.

Another hazard that is common to strong tropical storms or hurricanes are tornadoes. Be aware of the difference between a Tornado Watch, Warning, and where to take shelter.

Last but not least, use social media with care. This infographic speaks for itself.

WEATHER INFORMATION AND SAFETY LINKS

Here is a good start to a thorough list of weather information and safety rules sites. As I stated earlier, this list is not intended to be all-inclusive, used in place of official information, or used in life-and-death situations.

WEATHER  DATA

National Weather Service Homepage

National Hurricane Center

Storm Prediction Center

WEATHER SAFETY

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov: Plan Ahead For Disasters

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

I hope that this will help those of you who live in hurricane prone regions a place to spearhead your hurricane preparedness. Even if you live in an area where no hazards are possible in the next few days, you should have a preparedness plan in place regardless of the presence of any tropical cyclone. Being prepared is key to handling the approach of the storm, the hazards while it is in progress, and the situations you may face after the storm has passed. With knowledge being power, I also hope that this information will help alleviate some anxiety (which is normal, but often exacerbated by hyperbole) that you will no doubt be experiencing. Please remember to stick with official weather information sources and follow the broadcast media of your choice. Your local broadcast newspersons and meteorologists will have a wealth of important local information. As for forecasts, rest assured that the folks at the National Hurricane Center are the best in the business. Their number one priority is your safety and making sure that you have timely information. The same will go for your local National Weather Service office. Please follow all local advisories and warnings you receive. In closing, prepare now…evacuate if asked…stay informed…and stay safe!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For August 28 – September 3, 2018

Greetings to one and all! There’s a change in the seasons. From a weather and climate perspective, autumn has arrived in the Northern Hemisphere and spring is popping in the Southern Hemisphere. For many of us in North America and Europe, this long and very hot summer can’t end soon enough. In terms of tropical cyclone activity, the Atlantic basin is quite busy as of this post. We are just reaching the peak of the season from a climatological perspective with many more weeks to go. Plenty of other topics to look at, so let’s get started.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Save the date! It’s not too early to put the next Citizen Science Day on your calendar. It’s coming up on 13 April 2019. “The fourth annual Citizen Science Day celebrates and raises awareness about the amazing volunteers, projects, and scientific breakthroughs that are part of citizen science, encourages new people to get involved, and connects people to local events.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

This is an interesting study that really hits home with the state of Oklahoma…which happens to have played a part in this important study of earthquakes induced by waste water injection.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The California wildfires and resulting smoke are bad enough. For some with health issues, the smoke exacerbates existing health issues and can literally be life and death situations.

While on the topic of air quality and health, here’s a study in China that suggests a connection between air pollution and negative effects on people’s language and math skills.

The behavior of the Earth’s permafrost is changing very quickly. Even in winter, some Arctic areas that would freeze over every year no longer do that.

Here’s some good renewable energy news. “The USA Is On The Verge Of An Offshore Wild Revolution.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Is your hometown hotter today than when you were born? Check out this very informative interactive site with your hometown name and birth year and you’ll find out.

The true death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria may never be known, but the latest estimate is 2,975 fatalities in the six months following the storm.

With summer’s in the Northern Hemisphere getting longer in terms of hot temperature spells, September may soon be considered a summer month.

Last but not least, this is a very necessary study of a serious issue. All of these deaths could have been prevented…but children are still dying in automobiles from heat. This can occur when children are forgotten and left in cars or gain access to a car and lock themselves inside. In temperatures as low as the upper 70’s F, death can occur within a short period of time. Here’s the full study. “Trends And Patterns In Pediatric Vehicular Heatstroke Deaths, 1998-2017.” (23 page PDF document)

Finally, a quick reminder from the National Weather Service in Wakefield, VA on getting reliable, accurate, and potentially life-saving news and updates on tropical storm and hurricane information.

That will be a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…it’s nice to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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