Tag Archives: information technology

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 19 – 27, 2016

Greetings and happy Autumnal Equinox to folks in the Northern Hemisphere! If you’re south of the equator,  I hope your start to the spring season has gotten off to a grand start. There’s plenty of science news to peruse this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter could be going up for sale in the near future. Considering its my primary social media outlet, I’m watching this unfold with great interest and not a little concern.

Here’s an excellent read that you should take very seriously. “66 Ways To Protect Your Privacy Right Now.”

The FBI recommends that you cover up the webcam on your computer…and for a very good reason.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An interesting new perspective. “Scientists Confirm The Universe Has No Direction.”

A very intriguing read on Jupiter’s moon Europa and some of the newest “secrets” discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Here’s an example of recycling at its best! Check out this table made from plastic pollution that’s found in our oceans.

A very concise overview of the causes behind wildfires.

According to recent World Health Organization data, over 90% of the world’s population is breathing unhealthy air.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Frustrated by political inaction, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, didn’t mince words as to the immediate climate threat and published an open letter regarding climate change.

While ozone is unhealthy at ground level, it’s presence in our upper atmosphere is crucial. Here’s an excellent read on how and why ozone is measured from space.

A very impressive data set! “Longest historic temperature record stretches back 2 million years.”

Getting priorities straight with bipartisan support at home and cooperation with other countries is the most satisfactory path to dealing with climate change.

Is extreme weather driven by climate change costing USA citizens a lot of money? You bet it is. Current estimates tally a total upwards of $67 Billion US dollars.

Speaking of priorities, science is perhaps the only self-correcting field of study…and climate scientists are giving us fair warning that it’s time to recalculate the math on climate change.

“President Obama signed a presidential memorandum establishing that climate-change impacts must be factored into the development of all national security-related doctrine, policies and plans.” For the USA, this is good news. Like it or not, climate change has become an important part of national and foreign policy.

Here’s important information for folks who are deaf or hard of hearing and need important NOAA Weather Radio watches, warnings, and other important weather information.

The Autumnal Equinox arrived earlier this week for the Northern Hemisphere. Here are answers to the five most common questions regarding this annual event.

A lightning bolt in Oklahoma has been deemed the world’s longest…just under 200 miles in length!

Let’s hope this comes to fruition. “Senate Weather Bill That Supports Forecast Improvement Can Benefit All Americans.”

Can climate change deniers be some of the world’s most efficient contrary contrarians? According to this article, I’d answer that question in the affirmative.

Finally, a spot on info-graphic from Dr. Marshall Shepherd that should help you out when you’re dogged with that sophomoric statement about being “wrong half the time.”

cs9hjuexeaanjgp-jpg-largeI can recall many occasions where the Storm Prediction Center has been absolutely hitting the bull’s eye with severe weather outlooks…but if they’re off a bit (as happened a few weeks ago), you’d think it was the end of western civilization as we know it whilst people are calling for heads to roll. Much of the general public isn’t aware of the intricacies of weather forecasting and doesn’t comprehend the fact that dealing with a three-dimensional fluid that is in a never-ending state of erratic flux is one of the most daunting challenges a meteorologist/climatologist/weather hobbyist/storm chaser faces.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

————————————————————————————

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For August 15 – 29, 2016

Greetings all! I hope everyone’s having a great start to your week. Due to several previous time-consuming commitments I’ve had to delay publishing a post by one week. The tropical Atlantic has been very busy as of late with (as of 29 August 2016) one hurricane, two tropical depressions, and an interesting tropical wave near the Cabo Verde Islands. Two back-to-back hurricanes are also between North American and Hawaii. Ultimately, nature has the upper hand and will do things on its own time scale which is the primary reason for preparedness…regardless of whether an immediate threat is present…or not. Having said that, it would behoove us to keep tabs on the tropics…the peak of the season has arrived. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are the links for this post…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Do you use WhatsApp? I’d recommend you switch to Telegram. Here’s why.

All iPhone users need to get the latest iOS update immediately.

GENERAL SCIENCE

An eye-opening reminder as to why the maps we know and love offer a very distorted view of our humble home.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

There’s a solar eclipse treat on the menu next year for much of the USA and, understandably, many folks are not a little excited.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Summers in the U.S. bring more than just searing, dangerously hot days. When there’s little air circulation and the air becomes stagnant, high levels of air pollution and increases in the level of ozone are triggered by the hot temperatures. The resulting health consequences for millions of Americans is quite significant. The Tulsa, Oklahoma City, and Dallas/Fort Worth metros have had at least two “Ozone Alert Days” so far this summer.

Speaking of sizzling summer days, setting in traffic in urban areas has certain air quality hazards. Here’s a good read on how you can reduce your exposure to pollutants.

Here’s some very good renewables news. Wind power is flourishing in the USA. In fact, the first offshore wind farm in the USA is nearing completion. Unfortunately, the comments section on the latter link is exceptionally cynical.

If wind power won’t work for you, check out solar. The price of solar is declining to all-time record lows.

A disconcerting environmental science/climate read. “This year’s melt season in the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas started with a bang, with a record low maximum extent in March and relatively rapid ice loss through May. One NASA sea ice scientist describes this as ‘the new normal.'”

This is very exciting…not just for the USA, but the world in general. President Obama just quadrupled the size of a national marine monument off northwestern Hawaii. It’ll be twice the size of Texas!

Last but not least, the USA’s National Parks just celebrated their 100th anniversary. Here’s a spectacular VR trip through geologic time courtesy of NPR.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A concise overview of the recent deadly floods in Louisiana. By some accounts, the storm system responsible for the heavy rainfall was a “hurricane without the winds.”

This “no name” storm also dumped three times as much rain on Louisiana as Hurricane Katrina.

Here’s a very good read on the Louisiana flooding by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “5 Reasons Some Were Unaware Of One Of The Biggest Weather Disasters Since Sandy.”

On 24 August 2016, a localized outbreak of tornadoes occurred in parts of Indiana and Ohio. The Storm Prediction Center is now being raked over the coals for having “missed” a forecast. Did the SPC miss a forecast and, more importantly, does it matter? There’s been plenty of sophomoric “Monday morning quarterbacking” over this (the vast majority coming from amateur weather hobbyists) who think they are better qualified. I seriously doubt that. As with the hype over what was known as “Invest #99L,” nature always has the better hand and the ace up its sleeve. Dealing with a 3-D fluid that is in a constant state of change is difficult enough for day-to-day forecasting let alone a regional tornado outbreak that didn’t have all the parameters that would have given even the most seasoned forecasters a “heads up.” I can recall several instances this year alone where the SPC was absolutely spot-on in it’s forecast…but all it takes is one “miss” and the trolling begins.

A perfect example of how imagery is worth a thousand words. Take a look at the hottest weather ever visualized.

Can lightning be predicted in the same way forecasters predict precipitation?

An interesting, and irrevocable, climate science & economics connection. As our climate changes, our economies become more vulnerable. The time for economic adaptation is now.

Communities have traditionally prepared for natural disasters based on past events. Extreme weather events will now force communities to confront new climate patterns and prepare with a focus on the future.

An interesting read on the ocean-weather-climate link. “Pacific Sea Level Predicts Global Temperature Changes.”

The latest US Drought Monitor shows dry conditions persist in the western states while spreading in the southeast.

A spot-on read covering tactical capers of climate change denialists. This is anti-science mindsets at their best.

Speaking of climate change denialists, referring them as “skeptics” is disingenuous to the true meaning of skepticism.

THE QUIXOTIC

A spot 0n yet startling read by Lawrence M. Krauss. “Trump’s Anti-Science Campaign.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to give a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have new folks along with the old friends that have been a part of my online community for several years!

Cheers!

————————————————————————

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For April 18 – 25, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope everyone’s having a great week and, regardless of where you live, the weather’s to your liking. There are plenty of topics to cover this week, especially in the climate change realm, and we’ll touch on those. However, due to impending severe weather in the USA’s central and southern plains this week from 26 April – 28 April, this post will be shorter than usual. Speaking of the severe weather threat, this would be an excellent time to double-check your emergency preparedness kit, your NOAA weather radio, other reliable sources of information, and any other details regarding the safety of your family, friends, coworkers, and you. At the end of this post there are three infographics that will explain the basics of what you need to know for severe weather safety. Having said that, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Fortunately, reason and the scientific method have triumphed once again. “Court Tosses Kansas Case That Tried To Challenge Science Education Guidelines.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Smartphone users are redefining, and diminishing, privacy in public places.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read on the “irony” of Earth Day cleanups.

A nice read on seven things we’ve learned about our fragile and humble home since the first Earth Day back in 1970.

On the flip side, there’s plenty to celebrate on Earth Day…no need for endless pessimism!

Natural disasters around the globe have resulted in economic losses of roughly $7 trillion (equivalent to about £5tn or €6tn) since 1900, according to a new calculation from scientists.

The relentless drought plaguing the western parts of the USA has had far-reaching effects of many facets.

As many as half of all USA citizens breathe air that is literally a public health hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There’s no doubt about it that April is, statistically, the top month for long-track tornadoes in the USA.

An excellent climate read from Climate Central. “Flirting With The 1.5°C Threshold.

March, 2016 continues a global streak of staggering global warmth due to climate change.

With the Paris climate agreement now signed by more than half of the world’s countries, the hard work begins.

“By mid-century, pockets of southern Europe will face at least one severe climate hazard every year of the scale now occurring only once a century, according to a new study.”

Sad but true quote from Upton Sinclair. “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” No better way of displaying climate change denial at its best than with “Bill Nye the Science Guy Takes On Climate Denialist Joe Bastardi the ‘Goebbels’ Guy.”

Last, but not least, here’s some valuable information to have on hand with regards to the pending severe weather for this week…or any time of the year for that matter.

IMG_0805This graphic from the Storm Prediction Center explains what you need to know about the different levels of severe weather risks that are issued in outlooks.

Watch and Warning Info GraphicIf a watch or warning is issued for your area, here’s the basics of what you need to know…most importantly, the difference between a watch and a warning.

IMG_0807If a warning is issued for your area, any of the thunderstorms can contain at least one (if not all) of the above hazards.

Cg45hP8WgAAyK2h.jpg largeMany people are still confused as to the difference between a tornado warning vs. a tornado watch. Here are the basics of what you need to know.

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For April 11 – 18, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope everyone’s having a good start to your week and, if spring is on the menu, the last bits of winter are rapidly fading away. For folks south of the equator, there’s a touch of autumn in the air. Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. This week’s post will be on the brief side due to several severe weather events & previous commitments. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Many of us (including yours truly) are frequently the subject of histrionic rants from trolls. This past week was a perfect example when a certain individual unleashed a toddler’s temper tantrum of vitriol in an ad hominem attack as a response to a tweet I’d posted.

Twitter Troll Tweet 1 14 April 2016

Unfortunately, this particular tweeter didn’t take the issue directly to the publication and the article’s author in question and justified their action by preferring to, “kill the messenger” instead. The incident brings to mind a New Yorker article that is quite and enlightening read: “The Psychology Of Online Comments.” Oddly enough, said individual waited almost 48 hours after posting his tirade…and also deleted the tweet from his timeline. Funny that. 😉 What’s at stake for this individual, or any troll for that matter, is their online reputation…which is often irreparable when one let’s their emotions get the best of them as they hide behind the “anonymous” safety of a monitor.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

What does a space launch look like from space? Awesome!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Of the many environmental public health hazards, inhaling black carbon is perhaps one of the most underrated.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Apparently the folks at NASA have had their fill of anti-science climate change deniers. Haven’t we all. :-/

While on the topic of deniers, they swarmed well-known scientist Bill Nye’s Facebook page…and NASA showed up in short order to take them down a notch or two.

2016 could be well on its way to setting records world-wide for yet another hotter than normal year.

Before many small island nations are submerged by rising sea levels, they’ll dry out first.

A rather “spot-on” essay on five things only meteorologists really know.

This has been a long-time coming. “New Campaign Enlists Women In Boardrooms To Take Up Climate Issue.”

AccuWeather has decided to extend its highly controversial long-term 45 day forecasts to a whopping 90 days.

The folks at the National Weather Service in Amarillo, Texas, USA have put together a very nice info-graphic on the difference between a severe weather watch and warning.

Watch and Warning Info Graphic

ON THE (NOT SO) LIGHTER SIDE…

Asking random Swedes for their take on American climate change denial provides no surprising answers…unfortunately. :-/

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! Hope everyone’s having a good week and, if spring has sprung in your locale, I hope you’ve been enjoying the change of seasons. There’s plenty to cover this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Cyber-trolling appears to be an Internet manifestation of everyday sadism.” I couldn’t agree more.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

National Citizen Science Day is coming up soon in the USA! SciStarter has a page where you can find local citizen science events.

Check out this read about Aurorasaurus, a very cool citizen science project that helps NASA researchers understand auroras.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Good things come to those who wait until May, 2018. And I can’t wait to see the kind of awesome data NASA’s InSight mission collects on Mars.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

It’s hard to imagine that this is still a public health & quality of life issue in the 21st century.

The effects of climate change run far, wide, and include detrimental impacts on agriculture.

Interesting read on recent advances on making renewable plastics from plants and carbon dioxide.

Today’s youth are a priceless resource…and much of the future of our planet depends on science educational opportunities, environmental science in particular.

Mass media “cherry picking” is a common occurrence,  especially when it comes to communicating science stories to non-scientists.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There are 122 National Weather Service offices across the USA. They’re all engaged in social media; Facebook, YouTube, and (most importantly) Twitter. In addition to media weather outlets of your choice, it would behoove you to follow them.

The contiguous USA has nothing on Alaskan winters. “By Alaskan Standards, 29 Below Equals A Warm Winter.”

Meanwhile in Finland…”In its latest official reading of local weather patterns, the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI declared that in the future spring will arrive in Finland progressively earlier.”

In spite of the plethora of knowledge about El Niño, forecasting the event and it’s effects can be a daunting challenge.

An excellent Op-Ed by Climate Central’s Heidi Cullen: “The Climate And Weather.”

A fascinating look at climate data from the mid 20th century. Human induced climate change has existed much longer than previously thought.

A thought-provoking read (with plentiful links for more info) on a recent study claiming that climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of flood events.

By some accounts, weather events are this years most under-reported stories.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Feb. 22 – 29, 2016

Greetings to all! I hope everyone’s had an enjoyable week. Across North America, winter is winding down to a certain degree, but not without a recent spate of severe weather that, unfortunately, left several fatalities from tornadoes from Louisiana to Virginia over a two-day period. In spite of the calendar saying it’s still “winter,” severe weather knows no season…and there’s a plethora of examples of how severe thunderstorms and tornadoes can occur in the United States from January 1st to December 31st. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

An excellent read on the hazards of the online world. “Your Virtual Friendships Come With Privacy Risks.”

A very interesting look at ten surprising ways NASA technology has improved our standard of living and life on Earth.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An intriguing read on astronomers narrowing the search for “Planet Nine” in our solar system.

Check out this spectacular NASA video of a year in the life of our Sun.

A spectacular look at the rings of Saturn.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In North America’s driest place, millions of yellow flowers are blanketing parts of Death Valley.

Which country has the worst air pollution? The answer surprises many people.

Bra gjort, Norge! 🙂 “Norway announces plans for Europe’s largest onshore wind farm

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’ve not seen the new NOAA website, take a look. It’s very, very nice!

Do you have a new NOAA weather radio with Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME)? Here’s a list of state-by-state SAME codes for you to help with programming.

Interested in becoming a Skywarn spotter for your local National Weather Service? Here’s what you need to know.

Speaking of learning about weather, here’s a nice beginner’s page on reading synoptic weather charts.

A spectacular video of a trio of waterspouts over Louisiana’s Lake Pontchartrain on 23 February 2016.

Heat waves that were, back in the day a rare occurrence, could become the annual norm.

A look at climates past and present. The ice on Antarctica could be headed for a major meltdown.

Another very interesting look at the comparisons of climates past and present.

As tropical cyclone Winston weakened in the Pacific, NASA took some amazing views of a very potent storm.

Unfortunately, it’s not science that frequently guides acceptance or rejection of climate science.

For many denialists, this is the modus operandi. “What’s the easiest way to show the world isn’t warming? Simple: ignore the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels.”

Another example of climate denialism run amok as West Virginia, USA lawmakers push hard to block new science standards in schools.

Sadly, the climate change denialists that I referred to in the two previous posts will gladly stick their heads in the sand when faced with a case for optimism on climate change.

Last but definitely not least, here’s some potentially life-saving information on flood safety from the National Weather Service. Remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

CcB9szrW8AApdSV.jpg large

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For January 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope the new year is off to a good start for all of you. So far this year, at least for most of North America, it’s been a relatively tranquil winter. El Nino is still a big player on a larger scale, many of its effects are yet to be seen. There’s plenty of good news on the renewables front with wind power in particular taking a lot of steam out of the fossil fuels.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Of interest to users of the Windows OS. “Windows 8, Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, and 10 (mostly) consigned to the dustbin of history.”

Sometimes going offline is the best way to spend your time. I take regular breaks from the “online” world and highly recommend them!

PHYSICS

This has the potential to be big in the world of physics. “Rumors are rippling through the science world that physicists may have detected gravitational waves, a key element of Einstein’s theory which if confirmed would be one of the biggest discoveries of our time.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Say “Hello” to the Titanosaur, a species that may be the largest dinosaur ever discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very nice primer on fracking…explained plain and simple.

This was inevitable, and completely justified. “Oklahoma Residents Sue Earthquake Companies Over Earthquake Damage.”

A look at an underrated health hazard. “Shock figures to reveal deadly toll of global air pollution.”

An interesting look at the geology/climate connection. “Growth rings on rocks give up North American climate secrets.”

Ah, the good old days…they weren’t really all that good.

There are only five countries than can be held responsible for up to sixty percent of the plastic pollution in our oceans.

Here’s some awesome renewables news. “Wind power supplied 97% of electricity needs of Scottish households in 2015.”

Even in an oil state like Texas, wind power is making it’s mark and setting records.

If you live in an urban environment and ever needed a reason to plant a tree or two (or a dozen), here’s your excuse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A long-awaited upgrade will triple the forecasting computing power of the USA’s National Weather Service.

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on Hurricane Alex, a rare January, 2016 tropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

Here’s an impressive view of Hurricane Alex from NASA.

Could the ongoing El Nino lead to a below average number of tornadoes across the USA for 2016?

Not so long ago, the ozone hole was the talk of the atmospheric sciences. What happened to it?

There’s a strong correlation between the recent record breaking floods and rains in the UK and climate change.

A list of ten climate related records that you don’t necessarily want to have broken.

JUST FOR FUN

As the saying goes, “When In Rome…” Or, in this case, my beloved Sweden in winter... 🙂

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Dec. 29, 2015 – Jan 4, 2015

First and foremost, I’d like to wish all of my followers and readers a very Happy New Year! I hope the coming year brings you a wealth of new knowledge, good health, and a plethora of good times!

There’s a lot to be optimistic about in the coming year. In spite of ongoing obstacles, I’ve a strong intuitive sense that the best is yet to come for our generation and future ones.

This week’s post will have a few retrospective links taking a look back at various science stories of 2015…so on that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

From the American Association For The Advancement Of Science, a nice look back at their “best of 2015” science stories.

It’s hard to believe in 2016 that this is still and issue, but sadly it is. “Gender Equality In Science Will Require A Cultural Shift.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter has a new policy to ban hateful conduct, specifically terrorist groups.

A very disconcerting privacy and security read. “Recently Bought A Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Had Your Encryption Key.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Nice read on the Hubble telescope viewing the merger of two galaxies.

A fascinating retrospective. “‘Forgotten’ 19th Century Images of Eclipses, Stars, & Planets Found.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The “Quakegate” saga continues. Oklahoma State Rep on oil companies and earthquakes: “No one is taking this issue seriously.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In spite of some negatives, there were many positive environmental events during 2015.

A spectacular array of the top fifteen images of Earth from NASA taken during 2015.

More amazing NASA imagery of reading the English alphabet from space.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Hurricane Patricia is Climate Central’s image of the year. Considering the intensity of Patricia, it’s a sound choice!

A nice retrospective from Climate Central of their picks for the seven most interesting climate findings of 2015.

From Climate Reality, their take on the top climate moments of 2015.

Will 2016 be as warm as 2015? If the trend continues, the chances are good it will be as warm if not warmer.

A very thought-provoking read on four myths about how to deal with climate change.

El Nino may be responsible for havoc in some locations, but the folks in California see a positive side.

From Dr. Marshall Shepherd, a nice read on satellite vs. “ground” temperature readings.

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

For my fellow silent film fanatics…”The Most Risque Moments In Silent Cinema.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! See you folks next time!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Dec. 21 – 28, 2015

For those who are celebrating, Happy Holidays! Whether you’re with family and friends or alone…taking a few days off or working…I hope you’re having a nice holiday season. Since this is the holiday season, this week’s post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very important look at the cultural shift that has to come to fruition before gender equality in science can exist.

Check out this collection of the “best” science images of 2015.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

You can never read enough good advice on netiquette…and this article and this one are a “must reads.”

CRITICAL THINKING/SCIENCE EDUCATION

A very thought-provoking read. “Scientific Method And The Better Angels Of Our Nature.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

For those into birds and citizen science, here’s the perfect project to get you through the drudgery of the holiday season.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Changes in the way of life are an unfortunate byproduct of living in a city that has some of the world’s worst air quality.

Here’s some very encouraging renewables news. “Africa Could Lead World On Green Energy.”

Getting rid of holiday rubbish can be a hassle. Here’s a good read on how to handle the Christmas trash.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Polar Vortex was a hot topic amongst atmospheric scientists in the past two or three years, but not so much lately. What happened?

Did this year’s Christmas seem rather warm to you? Indeed it was…and a record shattering one at that.

A very nice read with an optimistic viewpoint. “This Is Why Scientists Have Hope For The Climate.”

That’s a wrap for this post! Once again, if you’re celebrating the holidays, I hope you’re having a grand time!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Nov. 29 – Dec. 6, 2015

Winter precipitation across the USA Great Plains has been one big story this week. While long-term outlooks are somewhat ambivalent as to what the rest of the season holds, the recent short-term has been active with quite a vigorous ice and snow event from Texas and Oklahoma into the Dakotas. Having said that, a significant portion of this and subsequent posts will focus on the United Nations Conference On Climate Change or COP21.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

When Apps Talk Behind Your Back.” An unsettling privacy and security read regarding some of Google Play’s most popular apps. There’s a good chance you may use one.

Technology has it’s good and bad sides. Here’s a sobering look at some vital life and social skills that may soon (if not already) seem bizarre and foreign to the “iGens.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you like weather, history, and citizen science, here’s the ideal project from NOAA.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Spectacular! “This Timelapse Video Of Radio Observatories Is Just Breathtaking.”

Amazing images! “Fly Over Pluto’s Craters, Mountains, And Plains…at 80 Meters Resolution!”

Fly Over Pluto’s Craters, Mountains, and Plains… at 80 Meters Resolution!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The state of Oklahoma has finally created a website devoted to the recent spate of earthquakes.

After two years of silence, Sicily’s Mount Etna erupted this past week.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Renewable energy sources are now becoming less expensive to use than the (inevitably ill-fated) fossil fuels.

Christmas Island may be small, but the amount of environmental data it can give regarding climate change is big.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Hot And Bothered” is a very nice COP21 overview from The Economist (16 page PDF file).

Another very nice concise overview of COP21 from Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “So What Is This Paris Climate Meeting Anyway? The Basics Of COP21.”

Here’s another good read that will clear the air (no pun intended) on translating technical climate and environmental terms for the general public.

One very good question. “Why Are World Leaders Calling Paris A “First Step” After 21 Years Of Climate Negotiations?

Two viewpoints on COP21: Even with a mutually beneficial deal, the earth’s warming will continue regardless.

“In Paris, All Eyes Turn To The Climate Negotiators.” And as of 2 December, 2015, they were behind schedule.

According to some recent polls, most Americans “believe climate change is real, and want the U.S. to take the lead in fighting it.”

Almost 200 nations have agreed on a rough draft for reducing emissions and staring climate change in the face. This good read from NPR has a link to the 48 page draft.

Considering the uptick in online vitriol concerning climate change and COP21, this is a badly needed article from Dr. Marshall Shepherd that is spot on. “3 Reasons Why People Are Loosing Friends Over Climate Change.”

Excellent read on climate change, sustainability, and the public health connection. “A transition to a sustainable society is thus not about sacrifice, but is a prerequisite for maintaining our health and welfare.”

Some very nice interactive maps for exploring climate change.

The ongoing California drought may have a deleterious effect on your grocery shopping.

A good review of the Central Pacific’s busy 2015 hurricane season.

With that vast majority of winter weather ahead for much of the Northern Hemisphere, here’s some handy Winter Weather Safety info from NOAA’s National Weather Service.

Being a female in broadcast meteorology isn’t easy, especially in small markets. Here’s the story of the “viral dress” that tells a lot about what it’s like to be a female TV meteorologist.

THE QUIXOTIC

As I’ve heard (and agreed) with many comments regarding this article, “Is this a third-rate Guardian editorial piece or something the author was too embarrassed to reveal her/his identity on?” Regardless, it’s quite a rich gem.

And that’s a wrap! I’d like to extend a sincere “Welcome” to my new followers on social media! Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

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