Tag Archives: led bulbs

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For May 5 – 12, 2015

The last day of an active severe weather episode is underway as of this post with tornado and severe thunderstorm watches in effect for parts of the Great Lakes and Ohio valley region. The focus of most of the week’s severe weather has been across the central and southern plains. If you’d like to review some of the data from past severe weather events, visit the Storm Prediction Center’s Severe Weather Events Archive. It’s a treasure trove of information that can prove helpful in many regards, especially for those interested in using past events and their relation to forecasting techniques. It’s also been a very long week for me…so this will be a very short post. Still, there are several items I’d like to share with you.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

How often should you post on social media? It depends on what you’re using. The most important “A-#1” rule to remember is…quality over quantity.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out iSeeChange… a crowdsourced citizen science journal of community submitted local weather and environment observations.

A reminder for you to download the mPING app for your iOS or Android smart phone. It’s a very small app, won’t take a lot of space, and will help weather research with your real-time reports!

Has Wyoming criminalized citizen science? Certainly seems suspiciously malevolent to me.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

“Using the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers have observed a gas clump in the early stages of its gravitational collapse for the first time.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

There’s a reason I never use incandescent bulbs unless absolutely necessary. “The Shocking Truth About LED lights.”

The western drought hasn’t spared Arizona from the same kind of water woes California is facing.

Starbucks is going to stop selling bottled water in drought-ravaged California.

The western drought isn’t only bringing problems related to water, the coming “fire season” is expected to be difficult as well.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

With the addition of the Marginal and Enhanced SPC risk categories, I’m often asked what is the meaning behind it all. Fortunately, the folks at SPC have this handy graphic.

A very interesting read on weather forecasters, specifically those in broadcast media, and changing attitudes toward climate change.

A very tough job indeed. “Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action.”

Being a geoscientist can be very hazardous work. Unfortunately, two scientists recently lost their lives while studying climate change.

It’s becoming increasingly difficult to access research stations in Antarctica due to sea ice which is increasing due to a variety of reasons.

Thanks to Hadley Cells, we can take a look at an interesting map that averaged cloud cover over our planet for the past thirteen years.

This past week was the 110th anniversary of the Snyder, OK tornado…one of the top 20 deadliest tornadoes in USA history. The death toll of 97 is approximate since there is no data on exactly how many people were killed. One of the more sobering images is the mass grave containing more than thirty unidentified fatalities from the tornado.

A QUICK NOTE TO MY NEW FOLLOWERS…

I’d like to extend a sincere “Welcome!” to my new followers! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There are some cool things in the works for Tornado Quest over the next few months. Like all good things, it takes time and finding the right people for the right job. If you’re new to Tornado Quest, don’t let the name fool you. I purposefully explore and share a wide spectrum of earth science information, specifically geoscience, environmental, and atmospheric science topics. There’s always something interesting going on with this amazingly complex planet we live on. To focus only on storm chasing and specifically tornadoes, really misses the point. As one of my meteorological mentors told me in the spring of 1984, “All weather is interesting. There’s something fascinating going on every day. If someone can’t grasp that and tornadoes are all they’re interested in, well…they’ve no business being a part of this science.” He couldn’t have been more correct.

That’s a wrap for this post! See you folks again soon!

Cheers!

Advertisements

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Nov. 2 – Nov. 9, 2014

This past week has seen a rather tranquil period of weather across most of North America. Alas, it won’t last. The coldest air of the season is scheduled to make its way across the eastern half of the US and will give many a good taste of winter. Grab those sweaters and put an extra log on the fire. We will need it.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Normally, I’m a very apolitical person. Taking into consideration recent political events, this is a very apt essay.

SOCIAL MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY

It’s about time a tool like this showed up on the internet. Meet WAM. While it is specifically geared towards women being harassed online, it can apply to anyone…male or female, young or old. Individuals engaging in harassment and or trolls had best mind their behavior…online and off.

Scientists are rapidly discovering the benefits of using social media for networking and sharing information.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’ve not checked out the Citizen Science Center’s website, I highly recommend you do. “You Can Do Science Too.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

LED bulb efficiency is pulling ahead of compact fluorescent bulbs…and they’re becoming more price friendly too.

A very interesting and encouraging look at America’s solar boom.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A connection between fracking and earthquakes? Surely you jest.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

I’ve had several inquiries via social media and email from folks wanting to know what the coming winter holds. Hopefully this information from NOAA will clear things up. Keep in mind, this is an outlook and NOT a forecast. There is a difference.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has written a very interesting, but rather technical, nine page PDF document on ENSO and the El Nino outlook for this year.

An interesting read on the connection between climate change and emerging diseases.

“In light of the recent IPCC report, we want to dismiss these fallacies and reiterate the truth.” Very well put.

Waters off the west coast of North America are running quite warm. What could this mean for the coming winter?

This is an amazing and rare “must-see” video of glaciers in action. Taking climate change into consideration, this is likely to become more commonplace.

And that’s a wrap for this post! See you folks again soon!

Cheers!

%d bloggers like this: