Tag Archives: Mars

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 17 – 29, 2016

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. For those in the USA who celebrated the holiday, I hope you had a very Happy Thanksgiving. I took advantage of the rare opportunity for some R&R time for myself, so this week’s post will be a bit shorter than usual, but still full of thought-provoking ideas. There’s plenty to catch up on, especially on the front lines of climate change. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

If you celebrated the USA’s Thanksgiving holiday, be thankful for many things, including science. There’s a myriad of topics to discuss and inspire a sense of wonder.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A reminder that even though winter may be settling in across North America, your mPING and CoCoRaHS reports are still important. They’re not just for severe thunderstorms. Every single report counts!

GEOGRAPHY

The Mercator maps that so many of us are familiar with give a very distorted view of the world. How distorted? This article with an interactive map with show you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Interesting news on Mars. “Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what’s in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Oklahomans are suing frackers over earthquakes. I sincerely wish them luck in their pursuit of justice. Their defendants are capriciously deviant and very wealthy.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

People in urban areas are at risk of air pollution induced health problems with around 85% exposed to levels deemed harmful by the World Health Organization. These particles are too small to see or smell, but have a devastating impact.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What scientists are seeing happening to the Arctic ice is both surprising and not a little alarming. Another spot-on and apt description is that the current scenario is, “seriously weird.”

The first decade of the 21st century set the pace. From Climate Central: USA Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming.

Perilous times ahead in the USA regarding climate science & renewable energy. “The world is waiting to hear what President-elect Donald Trump has in mind for governing the U.S. Among the biggest questions is what will happen to the budget for climate and energy-related activities.”

An ominous note to what lays ahead in the world wide theater. In early 2017, the USA is poised to begin a potentially disastrous retreat from climate science leadership. China is more than happy to step up, don the crown and seat themselves in the throne. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

The new GOES-R weather satellite is the most advanced one launched to date. It will not only provide amazing data, but could save your life someday.

As expected, Trump intends to dump the Paris climate accord, but at least 71 percent of the American public support it.

chart_paris-agreement-survey_718x361

It’s been a very quiet year in the USA for tornadoes. As of November 21, 2016, 830 preliminary tornado reports so far which is well below the statistical average.

cx5qmmouaaaryfw-jpg-largeThat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you live. Autumn is beginning to make its presence known in parts of North America. As of this post, a very warm spell has settled over much of the southern and central Great Plains of the USA. It’s been a long, hot summer and I’m ready for some cool crisp mornings with a change in fall foliage color. The tropical Atlantic is rather active at this time. Fortunately, none of the systems that are being watched are a current threat to any land masses or populated areas. As usual, there’s plenty to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read where scientists answer twenty questions on the future of humanity.

Speaking of questions, here’s an excellent and very objective read by Lawrence Krauss on twenty questions for this year’s presidential candidates. “The net result? There is something here for everyone, because every view, no matter how inconsistent, is presented somewhere.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very good Psychology Today article from 2014 on the nature of the online troll. Considering recent events, it’s a read worth revisiting.

Do you use WhatsApp? Be prepared to share (unwillingly) a great deal of your private information with Facebook. There’s an opt-out, but personally speaking. I’d recommend you change over to Telegram.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A look at an interesting concept of the possible climate of Mars past…and how it could have led to its present day appearance.

No, Cupid didn’t make the “heart” on Pluto. It was something else far more interesting.

Don’t mess with the Milky Way. “Kamikaze galaxy explodes after diving into the Milky Way.”

From the BBC…from auroras to galaxies… a nice collection of spectacular imagery.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

New scientific ways of monitoring and predicting the affects climate change have on our ecosystems are coming to fruition.

Ghost Forests” are on the increase thanks in no small part to climate change. Unfortunately, this is a trend that will be on the upswing for some time.

Driven by climate change, large masses of trees across the USA are succumbing to diseases, insects, droughts, and wildfires.

Check out this nice “gif” of the USA’s growing use of wind power. Take note that the South has a lot of catching up to do.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Meteorologists with the National Weather Service (NWS) have a tough job with many daunting tasks and challenges. They need all the public and governmental support they can get. Your local National Weather Service office as well as other NWS social media accounts are the definitive source for all-important and potentially life-saving information.

An excellent comic that should put (temporarily) the kibosh on “the climate has always been changing” denier crowd.

Part climate science and part public policy in an interesting read on how climate adaptation can save money and improve the quality of life.

A very good climate read. “Why We Don’t Know If It Will Sunny Next Month But We Know It’ll Be Hot All Year.”

I could talk about this until I’m blue in the face. There is a distinctive difference in weather and climate. Hopefully, this short video will clear up the confusion.

Over a month after the devastating August, 2016 Louisiana floods, environmental and health concerns are growing along with anger among residents in the affected areas.

Flooding of low lying coastal areas in the USA due to sea level rise is no longer a theoretical concept.

And that’s a wrap up for this post! For my new followers in social media, I’d like to extend a warm welcome…I am quite active in other forms of social media and would really enjoy connecting and collaborating with other folks into the sciences.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! If it’s hot in your location, I hope you’re keeping cool and comfortable. Here in the southern plains of the USA, we’ve got quite a heat wave thanks to a large dome of high pressure that’s parked itself over the region. Buckle up and enjoy the ride, this is going nowhere soon. Recent trends show much of the severe weather activity is occurring in the northern plains which is the climatological norm. Before we begin, I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There’s plenty of interesting reads in many areas, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA is racing to finish a new Mars rover, and the mission just got a launch and land date. The new rover will leave Earth by August 2020, and in February of 2021, it will hit the surface of the Red Planet to search for signs of life.

In this research project, the thick clouds that cover Venus are no hindrance to exploring the surface of the planet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A bizarre yet fascinating look at what happens when lava swallows a tree.

An interesting read on how some San Andreas fault earthquakes in the western USA can be triggered by the gravitational forces of the sun and Earth’s moon.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. The largest offshore wind farm in the USA could be coming soon to New York, if the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) approves the project as expected.

This is only bound to get worse. The largest freshwater lake in Florida, USA is covered in a scum of blue-green algae which is also traveling down nearby waterways and out to the coastline. Unfortunately, Florida’s current governor has done nothing in the past to prevent this environmental mess.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A big “Congratulations” to Jim Cantore who’s celebrating thirty years at The Weather Channel!

An excellent read that’s worth a re-post. “Meteorologists shouldn’t just ‘stick to the weather,’ they should openly discuss climate change.”

Is climate change truly here to stay? Yes…and here’s a list of seven (of many more) reasons why.

The true power of many becoming one can be invaluable. “Thirty-One Top Scientific Societies Speak With One Voice On Global Climate Change.”

Are the potential health dangers of climate change enough to make the public sit up and take notice? By some accounts, the answer is in the affirmative.

In order to reach climate goals & the 2°C (3.6°F) threshold, new technology is needed ASAP.

Unfortunately, billion dollar weather and climate disasters are becoming more commonplace…and it’s not because of inflation.

For those of us who live in large urban areas, this is no surprise. USA cities are becoming dangerously hot during our scorching summers.

You’ve probably been enjoying this year’s El Niño without realizing it. If your weather as of late has been pleasurable, hopefully you enjoyed it while it lasted.

Have you ever wondered how a NOAA National Weather Service office layout is setup? Here’s some fine examples.

Why are Swedes happy about a 25C “heatwave?” Simple…those kind of temperatures are rare in Scandinavia…even in the middle of summer.

Thanks a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! Hope everyone’s having a good week and, if spring has sprung in your locale, I hope you’ve been enjoying the change of seasons. There’s plenty to cover this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Cyber-trolling appears to be an Internet manifestation of everyday sadism.” I couldn’t agree more.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

National Citizen Science Day is coming up soon in the USA! SciStarter has a page where you can find local citizen science events.

Check out this read about Aurorasaurus, a very cool citizen science project that helps NASA researchers understand auroras.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Good things come to those who wait until May, 2018. And I can’t wait to see the kind of awesome data NASA’s InSight mission collects on Mars.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

It’s hard to imagine that this is still a public health & quality of life issue in the 21st century.

The effects of climate change run far, wide, and include detrimental impacts on agriculture.

Interesting read on recent advances on making renewable plastics from plants and carbon dioxide.

Today’s youth are a priceless resource…and much of the future of our planet depends on science educational opportunities, environmental science in particular.

Mass media “cherry picking” is a common occurrence,  especially when it comes to communicating science stories to non-scientists.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There are 122 National Weather Service offices across the USA. They’re all engaged in social media; Facebook, YouTube, and (most importantly) Twitter. In addition to media weather outlets of your choice, it would behoove you to follow them.

The contiguous USA has nothing on Alaskan winters. “By Alaskan Standards, 29 Below Equals A Warm Winter.”

Meanwhile in Finland…”In its latest official reading of local weather patterns, the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI declared that in the future spring will arrive in Finland progressively earlier.”

In spite of the plethora of knowledge about El Niño, forecasting the event and it’s effects can be a daunting challenge.

An excellent Op-Ed by Climate Central’s Heidi Cullen: “The Climate And Weather.”

A fascinating look at climate data from the mid 20th century. Human induced climate change has existed much longer than previously thought.

A thought-provoking read (with plentiful links for more info) on a recent study claiming that climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of flood events.

By some accounts, weather events are this years most under-reported stories.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Jan. 25 – Feb. 1, 2016

Happy February everyone! The first month of 2016 has come and gone in a flash. Before we know it, summer heat will be settling in over the Northern Hemisphere. In the meantime, January has been very active weather-wise for parts of North America and the UK. Both regions have experienced significant storms with hurricane force winds, blinding rains, devastating floods, and potentially deadly blizzard conditions. Let’s hope that February will be better behaved but, as is always the case, nature has the better hand and the money is always on the house. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Critical thinking and the scientific method are the key ingredients of sorting through the rubbish of conspiracy mindsets from proven facts.

So sad that in the 21st Century, this kind of retrograde mentality is not only being taken seriously, but flourishing with disturbing frequency.

TECHNOLOGY

Understandably so, Americans from across the political spectrum have become increasingly outraged and outspoken as they have learned more about growing surveillance by governments and corporations.

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Could you outrun a hungry Tyrannosaurus Rex? Even if you could, I would advice against it. 😉

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA’s Opportunity rover has gone above and beyond the call of duty by now purring smoothly into it’s 12th year of exploration.

This week marked the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. NASA marks the anniversary with a pledge to travel to Mars.

Can’t wait to see this finally in action! “Mirror on the Cosmos: NASA’s Next Big Telescope Takes Shape.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Wind and sunshine could power most of the United States by 2030 without raising electricity prices.

I’m really hoping that this comes to fruition. “By 2030, Renewables Will Be The World’s Primary Power Source.”

Huge hurricane resistant wind power turbines? Sounds like a sound idea to me!

A very sound idea! Denmark is preparing for climate change by building parks that can transform into ponds during heavy rainfall events.

Speaking of Denmark, the beautiful city of Copenhagen is set to divest from fossil fuels.

A sobering read on the increasing amounts of mercury found in rain water over the central and western parts of the USA.

It should come as no surprise that most of the earth’s pollution is created by only a small percentage of polluters.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Many of us, including yours truly, love snow…but is it safe to eat?

An interesting read on the recent USA snowstorm and it’s connection to climate change.

A good climate read. “Study Finds Slim Odds Of Record Heat, But Not As Slim As Reported.”

Using data going back centuries, climate scientists have found that modern-day European summers are the warmest since the height of the Roman empire. For all practical purposed, this will mean a new way of life.

In spite of recent rains and modest improvements, drought conditions persist in parts of California and Oregon where some reservoirs remain well below half of their capacity.

Capture 1

This one day view of our Earth from a satellite is spectacular and a “must see.”

THE QUIXOTIC

Well said! “I hope that by showing how eye-wateringly unlikely some alleged conspiracies are, some people will reconsider their anti-science beliefs.”
Burying one’s head in the sand may feel good for the moment, but it’s not a courageous way to face scientific facts for which there is indisputable evidence.
And that’s a wrap for this post!
I’d like to extend a warm welcome and “Hello” to all my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!
Cheers!
Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch
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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Nov. 8 – 15, 2015

Fortunately, for the time being, the tropics in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific are quiet. Very soon, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season will come to an end. 2015 will be another year in the books with North American not having a landfall from a major hurricane. It’s understandable that many folks in meteorology and emergency management are concerned about public complacency since 2005 was the last year the USA had a major hurricane make landfall.

In spite of the recent horrific events in Paris, the climate talks will commence without disruption…which is the way it should be. Never, ever give in or give up. And if you have an interest in the future of our planet, please keep tabs on the Paris climate talks as they progress.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC POLICY

If there was ever a time for a “break up” to occur, this is it. Considering the hostility that has arisen in the past few years, it’s time science moved on to greener pastures.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Your tweets (20 million of them) reveal a great deal about your behavior and real-world situations.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Citizen science and your body and health are a good match. Check out these six projects.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

There could be many contenders for this title, but I’d have to agree overall that Darwin’s “Origin Of Species” is a good choice as the most influential academic book.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Intriguing read about one of our solar system neighbors. NASA probe shows how solar burps may have stripped Mars of water.

5,400 MPH winds were discovered blasting around an exoplanet. I wonder what that would be on the EF-Scale?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A bit of public health and environmental science. The health benefits to spending time in nature are unmistakably good to your health.

A dubious milestone indeed. Our humble home is on track to end 2015 with an average of 1 degree C of warming.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A sobering read on the rising levels of global atmospheric carbon dioxide.

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a detailed review of USA significant weather anomalies and events for October, 2015.

Oct 2015 Weather

Here’s a nice map from the Storm Prediction Center of preliminary USA tornado totals for 2015. With severe weather having occurred in the past week and more storms on tap for 16 November, 2015, these numbers will go up.

2015 USA Tornado Count

The states with above normal numbers of documented tornadoes are listed in red. The above average list not only includes traditional “Tornado Alley” states of CO, IL, KS, OK, and TX, but also HI and MA. It’s also interesting to note that many states, such as AR, MS, and TN (located in what’s often referred to as “Dixie Alley”) are having a well below average years. Annual anomalies in tornado occurrence are very common and often the numbers of confirmed tornadoes is or isn’t dependent on population density, topography, and when the tornadoes occurred.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere “welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Instagram & Tumblr.

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Oct. 14 – 25, 2015

There have been many big weather and climate relates stories this week but the one that was most dominant was Hurricane Patricia. There’s no doubt that Patricia was one for the record books, but the manner in which that was conveyed by mainstream media to the general public has brought about a great deal of discussion. The latest US Drought Monitor shows a startling increase in drought conditions from Texas into Mississippi as the western states drought has become the “status quo.” As for our climate, the latest State Of The Climate report has been issued and, to no one’s surprise, September 2015 was indeed warm…globally.

Shifting gears here a bit at Tornado Quest. Our weekly Science Links And More will now be posted on Sundays. As a result, and due to several other ongoing (but exciting) projects, this post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Fight For The Future is worth checking out, especially if you have concerns about privacy rights.

If you use the iOS operating system, there’s 184 new emojis to choose from…including a tornado!

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a list of six cool citizen science projects to help you monitor the environment around you.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Mars has a very unique climate…a bit like Earth’s, and simultaneously a bit “alien.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

No surprise here. In fact, this was quite inevitable. USGS study links earthquakes due to fracking as far back as the 1920’s.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out. One of the most startling (but sadly not unexpected) findings is that during September, 2015, record warmth was documented globally.

The public perception of climate change is finally beginning to change itself and concur with the overwhelming scientific evidence.

This week’s US Drought Monitor (20 October 2015) shows the rapid spread of drought conditions from central Texas into western Mississippi.

Hurricane Patricia was a truly remarkable event in the eastern Pacific. Here’s a very nice overview from NASA with some spectacular imagery.

Near the height of Patricia’s intensity, this is what the Category 5 hurricane looked like from a visible satellite viewpoint at 9:15AM (1415 UTC) on 23 October 2015.

Hurricane Patricia Vis Sat 1 23 Oct 2015 1415 UTC

Finally, a somewhat technical but interesting read on atmospheric chemistry and air pollution in China.

I’d like to send a hearty “welcome” to my new followers on social media! Glad you’re along for the fun! 😎

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Sept. 23 – 30, 2015

All eyes are on the Atlantic as Hurricane Joaquin intensifies and is forecast to effect the eastern USA seaboard and many inland areas. There still exists a great deal of forecast uncertainty and there are a myriad of variables to contend with. We’ll touch on that later. In other news, a very nice lunar eclipse provided quite a spectacle for tens of millions of people. Trust me, it was quite a sight. There was also exciting news from NASA regarding the presence of water on the planet Mars. In consideration of the ongoing events (Joaquin) and several important projects underway, this week’s post will be exceptionally brief.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

National Preparedness Month may be coming to a close, but that doesn’t give anyone permission for complacency or the luxury of not worrying because, “those things only happen to other people. Yes, it can happen to you. The impacts to you could be considerable, even as a storm is weakening, well inland, and no longer has many of its tropical characteristics. This is a case where it’s best to err on the side of caution…just in case.

 GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Bad science is always fair game…and should be. It should also be “called on the carpet” at every opportunity.

The USA is stuck with an anti-science congress. Unfortunately, that’s not likely to change soon.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out the myriad of citizen science opportunities from NOAA.

Like to help document light pollution in urban areas? There’s an app for that.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The exciting astronomy news this week: salty water detected flowing on Mars in close proximity to the Curiosity rover.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Air pollution kills millions every year. Who does it kill and why…and what can be done about it?

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read by Greg Laden: The Climate Change Consensus Extends Beyond Climate Scientists.

Hurricane Joaquin is the big meteorology story for the next several days. In addition to the broadcast meteorologists of your choice, NOAA weather radio, and your local National Weather Service office, follow the National Hurricane Center for the latest updates on Joaquin. For the benefit of the safety of your loved ones as well as yourself, please use very strong discretion in filtering information about Joaquin. Your weather information, including potentially life-saving warnings, needs to come from official sources. In the twenty-plus years I’ve been using the internet, a great deal of speculation can find its way into the public’s discussion. At this time, my bottom line message to you is prepare ahead of time while you have time.

THE QUIXOTIC

Another loose cannon donning a tin foil hat is on the loose. What will they dream up next? 8-/

On the brighter side, two last bits of business…

  • I’d like to send a very warm welcome and “hello” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you folks are along for the fun. The best is yet to come and I’m in this for the long haul.
  • Coming soon, I’ll be hosting weather and science “hangouts” on FriendLife. Dates and times will be posted on Tornado Quest’s Twitter, Facebook, and WordPress social media outlets. I look forward to chatting with many of you!

That’s a wrap for this week!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For March 23 – 30, 2015

To say that the severe weather season for the contiguous USA got started with a “bang” is a vast understatement. Nature pulled a fast one on us. What appeared as a potentially big (literally) hail day with a Moderate and Enhanced Risk for parts of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma turned out to be an event with all modes of severe weather occurring. At the bottom of this post will be sites with up-to-date information relevant to the event. Is this an omen as to what the rest of the severe weather season will bring? Not likely, but then again, nature always has the better hand and the ace up the sleeve. We’ll have to wait and find out. As for preparedness, it’s best to be prepared for emergencies even if one doesn’t occur. There’s plenty of other interesting topics for this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very telling read about scientists studying journalists that cover science.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Once again Twitter shows off its third-rate milquetoast attitude towards trolls and bullying.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The scorch marks left by our rovers are Mars quickly fade as the red planet reclaims traces of our presence.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

As a former HVAC technician, I can vouch for the validity of this infographic on the dangers of indoor air pollution.

A new study shows the extent that humankind has tailored the Earth’s landscapes to our own devices at the expense of the rest of the natural world.

The current California drought isn’t helping the already problematic air quality issues.

Did you take part in Earth Hour on 28 March 2015? I did…and didn’t miss anything I thought I might.

Here’s some awesome renewables news from the Lone Star state! Georgetown, Texas will get all of its power from solar and wind. They should win an award. Now, who’s next?

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s the latest US Drought Monitor. Unfortunately, little to no change from last week. This past week’s rainfall in the southern plains didn’t fall on the parts of Oklahoma and Texas that need it the most.

Interesting new study based in part on NASA satellite data has shows an increase in large, well-organized thunderstorms is behind increased rainfall in the wettest tropical regions.

A very thought-provoking read on the media’s response to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

It’s our responsibility to leave a health planet for our children, grandchildren, and the many generations to follow. “Tackling Climate Change ~ For Our Kids.”

Antarctica may have seen a recent high temperature record. 63.5F may not be blistering hot, but it’s toasty for that continent.

Speaking of Antarctica, it’s ice shelves are not in the best of shape.

THE 25 MARCH 2015 OKLAHOMA AND ARKANSAS SEVERE WEATHER EVENT

First, some handy safety tips from AAA on what to do if you’re driving and find yourself caught in a storm. Ideally, the best thing to do is not wind up in that kind of bind in the first place!

Summary pages of the 25 March 2015 severe weather events from the Tulsa, Norman, Springfield, and Little Rock National Weather Service offices. Much of this information is preliminary and updates will be added often.

Here’s an excellent video by broadcast meteorologist George Flickinger of Tulsa’s KJRH discussing the Sand Springs, OK tornado and how the silly myths (rivers and/or hills protecting a town or city) were blown away by this storm.

Nice radar images from the Tulsa NWS of the Sand Springs, OK tornado.

An impressive gallery of images from the Tulsa World of the Sand Springs, OK tornado damage.

An excellent must-read for anyone who really wants to understand the dynamics of severe weather: “The Science Behind The Oklahoma And Arkansas Tornadoes Of March 25, 2015.”

As time allows, I may add a few more links with further information regarding this event.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d also like to extend a hearty welcome to my new followers…very glad you’re along for the fun!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Dec. 29, 2014 – Jan. 6, 2015

By now, most of you have had your fill of “new year wishes” but bear with me and allow me to indulge in one more. To all my loyal followers…old and new…I’d like to wish you a great 2015. In spite of the fact that New Year’s Eve is one of the most overblown “holidays” of the year, let’s learn what we can from our mistakes and/or miscalculations in 2014 and look to the future. It’s my sincere hope that lady luck flies in close to all of us on each perilous mission we take. This year will also be a pivotal one in terms of climate change, sustainable lifestyles, renewable sources of energy, space exploration, and so much more.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’ve got the means, you can take part in the world’s biggest high altitude balloon flight.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Deleting yourself from the internet grid isn’t easy, but here are some tips on how to get started.

When a Google search isn’t enough, there are alternatives.

If you’re browsing in private mode, it may not be as private as you think.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A 3.9 billion year old meteorite from Mars is giving insight into that planet’s history.

How would this rate on the Enhanced Fujita Scale? The Hubble telescope has peered into the depths of our Milky Way galaxy and discovered a point where an eruption drove gases outwards at 2 million miles per hour.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Being a sustainability optimist, I can’t help but share this good essay. “9 Reasons Not To Be Depressed About The Planet.”

Dont’ toss that dried up Christmas tree in the trash. Here are four ways to recycle your tree for wildlife.

Speaking of Christmas, how is it possible to recycle Christmas lights?

Any good news is always welcome on the environmental science front. Here are ten reasons to be encouraged that environmental progress was made in 2014.

On the downside, the news regarding sea levels isn’t good.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

From the fine folks at NCAR/UCAR, a look back at their top ten stories of 2014.

Most of us have always heard that no two snowflakes are alike. Here’s an interesting look at a new perspective on snowflake formation.

As the final data from 2014 comes in, it’s looking more and more likely that last year was the warmest ever for our planet. The Japanese Meteorological Agency has solid data.

The Guardian has their take on the last best chance to reach an agreement on cutting carbon emissions.

Good tips on how to become a climate change activist.

Here’s a “spot-on” read…”18 Scientists And What They Actually Think About Climate Change.”

Sir David Attenborough: Climate change threatens humanity – but those in power deny it. Why? It’s easier (and more profitable) that way.

Not even the Pope is immune to the rants of climate change denialists.

Why isn’t Greenland…green? It’s partially climate, partially geology.

Finally, 2014 will go down as the year Oklahoma had the fewest tornadoes since official records began in 1950. Considering the brutal beatings from tornadoes the Sooner state has taken in the last 15 years, who in their right mind would complain?

That’s a wrap for this post…

Cheers!

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