Tag Archives: public health

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 15 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking in your location. The big storms across the United States this week has been the solar eclipse, the first significant one for almost a century. The tropical Atlantic has been somewhat more active as of late. The major concern at this date (22 August 2017) is the remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey which could bring substantial rainfall totals to much of Texas and possibly Louisiana. There are plenty of other topics to touch on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

The presence of the troll in social media is nothing new. The sad fact is most anyone can (during a momentary lapse of decorum) can become one.

PUBLIC HEALTH

There is a myriad of hazards from weather and climate conditions. Depending on the time of year and location, bugs can be an even greater hazard…many of which spread diseases for which there is no cure.

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s an essay that’s quite good in reminding us of the fact that science, in its best form, is its harshest critic. It’s all part of how the scientific method works.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

After thousands of years, solar eclipses are still fascinating to scientists…and that’s a very good thing!

If you get the chance to watch another eclipse, please remember to take the necessary safety precautions.

If you missed the 21 August 2017 eclipse, don’t worry. There are several others in the coming years that will pass across North America.

Over the next 50 years, you can travel to a number of locations around the globe to witness an eclipse.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. “The increasing presence of wind and solar in the United States helped prevent the premature deaths of up to 12,700 people between 2007 and 2015.”

In consideration of the abundance of bad news, here are some amazingly beautiful images of our incredible home that will offer a visual respite.

 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For months, several Atlantic hurricane season outlooks have stated that 2017 would be an active year. This still could come to fruition. The most important element to remember; regardless of how many storms form, it only takes one tropical cyclone landfall to make for a major disaster.

Here’s a look at tropical cyclone formation outlooks from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center from 23 August to 5 September 2017. An active period is anticipated in portions of both the Pacific and Atlantic.

Graphic courtesy Climate Prediction Center

In California, scientists are taking the reigns of climate research in their own hands. Considering the current hostilities toward climate research, this may be necessary for many other USA states.

It may be August, but for parts of Sweden, it’s time for a touch of snow.

Studying climates of the past (paleoclimatology) is important because it can give us glimpses into the climates of the future.

PUBLIC POLICY

Considering all parties involved, this should come as no surprise to those of us who live in Oklahoma. The Sooner State’s new Attorney General is opposed to the proposed Oklahoma wind farm that could be the largest in the United States.

Nothing good can come from this. “US president Donald Trump’s administration has disbanded a government advisory committee intended to help the country prepare for a changing climate.”

In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence and a global consensus, some of climate change’s most vulnerable victims are the most fervent skeptics of science.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun. Tornado Quest covers a diverse range of topics including environmental issues, climate change, renewable energy sources, and much more. You’ll find much to enjoy, or provoke thought, with our accounts on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Summer Heat Illness: Potentially Deadly Yet Preventable. #SummerHeat

With the early summer heat that’s forecast for many states, it’s a good idea to review some summer heat safety precautions. The National Weather Service has one of the most comprehensive Heat Safety sites available. You’ll find not only how to stay cool, but how to care for children, pets, and vehicles, but information on ultraviolet (UV) safety and a heat index graphic which shows you (in spite of the actual air temperature) what temperature your body thinks it is and will react to.

Even the heartiest of souls can fall victim to heat illness. Here’s a quick reference infographic on the differences between Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke…the latter of which can easily turn deadly. 

See the Common Heat Related Illnesses tab at the  NWS Heat Safety site for more important details on how this health issue can impact you.

In the meantime, stay cool and hydrated, dress for the weather, and don’t forget the sunscreen!

Cheers!

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Email: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For May 1 – 8. 2017 #HurricaneStrong

Hurricane Preparedness Week #HurricaneStrong has started for the USA. This week’s focus will be on preparing for these powerful storms. If you live in a hurricane prone region, now is the time to prepare. There are numerous websites from the National Weather Service, the American Red Cross, and FEMA that have helpful information.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

With the current USA’s Environmental Protection Agency now out of the climate science business, here are some good resources to keep yourself informed.

Here’s some very good renewables news. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), a new wind turbine was installed every two and a half hours in the United States during the first quarter of 2017.

Arbor Day may only officially be celebrated once a year, but in reality every day can be arbor day.

In spite of improvements in many countries, air pollution still is a substantial public health issue round the world with developing countries having the most troubles.

The contentious atmosphere (no pun intended) surrounding the current presidential administration, the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues with nefarious overtones.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

It’s Hurricane Preparedness Week in the USA from May 7 – 13, 2017. Now is the time to get prepared if you live in a hurricane prone region. The National Weather Service has a comprehensive hurricane preparedness website with all the information you need. On Twitter, you can also follow @NWS along the #hurricanePrep #HurricaneStrong & #ItOnlyTakesOne hashtags for more information.

Here’s a very nice infographic from the National Weather Service with a plethora of information on the WSR-88D weather radars that are an invaluable part of the forecasting and warning process.

NOAA has a very useful tool you can use to find out how climate change will affect your neighborhood.

Taking into consideration the recent changes in the Antarctic ice shelves, a major break could be imminent.

A slower rise in global temperatures from 1998 to 2012 has been hailed by climate change denialists as proof that Earth’s climate isn’t changing and future projections are irrelevant. In fact, new data show that the “hiatus” has no impact on long-term climate change projections.

Big changes in the broadcast meteorology field with the minority finally becoming the majority. Broadcast meteorologists are coming to the inevitable conclusion that they’re not only the only scientists their viewers will ever see on television, but that climate change is now a part of the essential information they must convey to their viewers.

The recent drought in California may be linked to a newly identified climate pattern.

This past week marked the eighteen anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas and Oklahoma tornado outbreak, the largest outbreak to date in the history of Oklahoma. The National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, OK has a comprehensive retrospective with a wealth of information. And yes, it can and will happen again.

This past week also marked the tenth anniversary of the Greensburg, KS EF-5 tornado. Thanks to fast and effective warnings from the Dodge City, KS National Weather Service and good coverage by broadcast meteorologists, many people had plenty of warning. A few decades ago, a tornado of this magnitude would have resulted in dozens of fatalities.

We’ve not heard the last of this for a long, long time. “New York Times Wants To Offer Diverse Opinions. But On Climate, Facts Are Facts.”

Finally, some helpful lightning safety information courtesy the National Weather Service office in Burlington, VT. Every year approximately thirty people are killed and hundreds injured in the USA alone from lightning. Most if not all of these deaths and injuries are avoidable.

That’s a wrap for this post…see you next time!

Cheers!


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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links For November 10 – 17, 2016

Greetings everyone! How’s the weather in your neighborhood this week? Hopefully it’s to your liking. In parts of North America, we’ll be getting a good shot of cold autumn weather for mid November. In spite of that, much of the NOAA outlooks for the next week or so hint at relatively clement weather…which is good if you’ll be doing any traveling for the American Thanksgiving holiday. Regardless, be sure to keep tabs on forecasts for both your local area, destination, and all points in between. Things can and will change unexpectedly. It’s been a very busy week here with my dance card full and my cup runneth over repeatedly…so this post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE EDUCATION

The fine folks at Science Friday have compiled a very cool list of six things you can break down right now!

Much to my delight, “the Paris Agreement includes Article 12, calling for the promotion of climate-change education — and the 2030 Agenda includes a comprehensive Sustainable Development Goal on education, with a specific target on education for sustainable development. Education is key to understanding climate change — it is vital to learning to adapt and take action, for today’s generation and tomorrow’s.”

Like it or not, science and politics (both foreign and domestic) go hand in hand more so now than ever before. With the recent USA election in mind, a few prominent scientists shared their reactions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

For many years, a clean energy transition was said to be much too expensive and troublesome by skeptics and special interests. Furthermore, they claimed it would make consumers’ energy bills very expensive and increase operating costs. They were dead wrong.

Most everything we use can be recycled. If that’s the case, why don’t we do more recycling than we do now?

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Stop what you’re doing and take a deep breath. Chances are that the air you just breathed in and out is polluted.

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ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

October, 2016 was yet another record-breaking month for global temperatures. On its current track, 2016 looks to top 2015 for the year as a whole.

oct-2016-temp-mapFor October 2016, NASA’s map show lots of yellow, orange, and red. Simply put, those are areas where temperatures were well above average for the month. Map courtesy Climate Central & NASA.

Here’s an excellent piece by climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. “Dear President-Elect: Climate Change Is Not A Hoax, And We’re All In This Together.”

La Niña is here and is playing a major role in the ongoing drought and worsening wildfires in the southern USA states.

Regardless of who is president, climate…and nature overall…supersedes any policy designed to focus on short-term goals.

Ending on an aesthetically positive note, take a look at these spectacular autumn vistas captured by drones.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For October 10 – 17, 2016

Greetings to everyone! I hope you’re all having a great start to  your week and the weather where you live is being kind to you. The big weather story this week is the ongoing flooding in parts of the southeastern USA, North Carolina in particular, that resulted from Hurricane Matthew. In climate science, substantial progress has been made with dozens of countries agreeing on pacts that will have a dramatic impact on the quality of life for every one of us. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION/SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

A nice overview of the challenge of communicating science to the general public.

A fascinating take on the gender differences that are often perpetuated within the sciences. “Metaphorically Speaking, Men Are Expected To Be Struck By Genius, Women To Nurture It.”

A chilling segment broadcast on Science Friday on 14 October 2016 on the ‘dangers’ involved in scientific research.

A very thought-provoking essay and overview of four new books that, “one way or another, our planet is wilder and weirder than the rules we are used to would predict.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES/RECYCLING

Ozone is beneficial in the upper levels of our atmosphere. The opposite is true at ground level where humans and other life forms exist. While many effects of ozone are understood, more are being researched and, as our planet warms, concern is growing about the public health and environmental impacts of this toxic substance.

A unique solution to a renewable energy challenge. “Scotland region will be 100% powered by kites within a decade.”

You’d think that in this day and age, irresponsibility like this wouldn’t be an issue, but it is. “British Households Fail To Recycle A ‘Staggering’ 16 Million Plastic Bottles A Day.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Ever wonder what it’s like to ride along with hurricane hunters? It’s not for the faint of heart. This video gives you an inside view.

If there’s a good chance of La Nina for North American in the coming months, how will it affect the coming winter?

Are you a storm chaser or have a particular interest in severe weather and tornadoes? Here’s a good read that should spearhead some of your own research into tornado genesis. “Wind Patterns In Lowest Layers Of Supercell Storms Key To Predicting Tornadoes.”

Simply put, this headline is spot on. “If Congress Invests In Seasonal Weather Forecast Research, Everybody Wins.”

Ever feel dismayed about overwhelming evidence on climate change? There’s no need to. Here’s a good viewpoint on how to “make lemonade out of climate change.”

Here’s an excellent Q & A from the Union Of Concerned Scientists regarding drought conditions that plague over 40% of the USA.

This is perhaps the biggest climate change news in quite some time. Over 190 countries have agreed to limit the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in the battle to combat climate change. It’s a very important step that is vital to the world we live in today…and for future generations.

A startling look at the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti with photos and maps.

ONE IMPORTANT LAST MESSAGE…

Please show your support & wear Orange this Wednesday.

UNITY DAY: Together against bullying — united for kindness, acceptance and inclusion. Wednesday, October 19, 2016

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 26 – October 3, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to your week. For much of North American, there’s a touch of autumn in the air while spring is starting to kick in for the Southern Hemisphere. The big news this week (and for many days to come) is Hurricane Matthew, the first hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic season to achieve major hurricane status and the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic/Caribbean basin in almost a decade. Matthew has provided a consistent forecasting challenge and will continue to do so for several more days. As of today 4 October 2016) evacuations are pending for many areas along the southeastern USA coast. There’s also a severe weather threat in the USA’s central plains today…lots going on weather-wise for much of North America…so lets get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

With Hurricane Matthew threat to many areas of the Caribbean (and North America), here’s some helpful information on making your own emergency preparedness kits. “Making a preparedness kit is one important way you can protect yourself and those around you. Remember that there are many types of emergencies – from those caused by illness to natural disasters – and you need different types of kits for a variety of situations.”

Further hurricane safety information…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Do you live in a noisy location? If so, it can affect your quality of life. Here’s a cool citizen science project you can take part in…find out how noisy your location is while supplying data for an important study.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Perhaps we’re not out in the boonies as much as we thought. “It’s tricky to map an entire galaxy when you live in one of its arms. But astronomers have made the clearest map yet of the Milky Way – and it turns out that the arm that hosts our solar system is even bigger than previously thought.”

New research on Pluto suggests that it could have a deep salty ocean.

Check out this spectacular view…the first of its kind…of a billion stars shining in the Milky Way galaxy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read on why you shouldn’t put all of your trust in a hurricane’s “cone of uncertainty.” Forecasters have a daunting challenge that is often made much worse by the almost unfathomable complexities of our planet’s atmosphere.

The NRDC has an excellent a concise overview on global warming that covers most any question anyone could ever have about this aspect of our changing climate.

A look into climates past. The longest lasting deserts on Earth are approximately 30 million years old and can give us a glimpse into future climate.

An interesting read on a surprising source of greenhouse gases…reservoirs built for many uses, including hydropower, drinking water, farm irrigation, and flood control, etc.

Part climatology, part public health in this read that, while focused on Australia, is applicable to all countries. Many in the medical profession are unsure of how to deal with climate change and its irrevocable connection to our health and well being.

Our planet’s future does depend on your vote. And this year, the stakes are higher than ever.

Speaking of the future, “Dear Tomorrow” is a project where today’s parents are writing letters concerning climate change to children of the future.

Finally, a sobering read that can be summed up by simply saying, “Science, Know Thy Enemy.” How The Attack On Science Is Becoming A Global Contagion.

Sorry to end this post on such a dour note, but unfortunately that is the current political, theological, and cultural climate we live in.

On a lighter note, I’d like to extend a sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There are lots of good times ahead.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links More For September 5 – 12, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope that everyone’s having a great week and the weather is being kind to you. For the time being, the tropics are void of any substantial tropical cyclones, but that could change. We’re at the peak of the hurricane/typhoon season with many weeks left to go in both the Atlantic and Pacific. On a local note, the most intense earthquake in the history of Oklahoma occurred on the morning of September 3, 2016 as a whopping 5.8 magnitude quake shook the Sooner state and was felt for hundreds of miles. And, as usual, there’s plenty of interesting climate news to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Pawnee, OK earthquake of 3 September 2016 has been upgraded by the USGS to a 5.8 magnitude…the strongest earthquake (so far) in the history of Oklahoma. The saga of shake, frack, & roll continues much to the chagrin (and not a few frazzled nerves) to many residents of the Sooner state.

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Short term gain with disregard to irrevocable negative effects on future generations. A new study shows humans have destroyed one-tenth of the Earth’s remaining wilderness in the last twenty-five years.

Some of these photographs are awe-inspiring views of nature, others sobering reminders of the challenges we face. All are, from a photographic perspective, spectacular images.

From Climate Central, a very good read on the irrevocable link between climate and life forms. “The soaring temperature of the oceans is the “greatest hidden challenge of our generation” that is altering the make-up of marine species, shrinking fishing areas and starting to spread disease to humans, according to the most comprehensive analysis yet of ocean warming.”

Good news on renewables energy sources is always welcome and this certainly fits the bill. The USA has unveiled its vision for wind farms off of nearly every U.S. coastline by 2050 which could generate 86 gigawatts of electricity from offshore wind which would be enough zero-carbon power for over 23 million homes.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The summer of 2016 was scorching across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic USA states, with several in those regions recording their hottest August in 122 years.

It’s been over a decade since a major hurricane has made landfall in the USA. “While the U.S. has been in a major hurricane drought since 2005, those top level storms have actually become more common in the Atlantic basin. The reason could be linked to rising sea surface temperatures — fueled in part by global warming — as seen in ocean buoy data collected along the U.S. coast.”

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NOAA’s National Center for Environmental Information has a new way of displaying the USA’s climate data on maps. Check it out here!

We’ve a long way to go, but here’s a good first step in a long journey. “Here’s What China And The U.S. Just Committed To On Climate.”

California is spearheading the way to climate change legislation, but with forty-nine states to go, we’ve a long road ahead.

An ominous sign of things to come. A link between the recent Louisiana flooding and climate change has been established.

With glaciers disappearing at an alarming rate, scientists are storing pieces of glacier ice for safekeeping.

Poor air quality, regardless of its origins, is a costly issue in terms of finances and human lives and kills more people annually than all other forms of natural disasters combined.

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

If this is what sophomoric ne’er-do-wells do with their vehicles, goodness knows what goes on in their homes behind closed doors. “Rolling Coal: The Grownup Equivalent Of Soiling Your Pants.”

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That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m very glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! If it’s hot in your location, I hope you’re keeping cool and comfortable. Here in the southern plains of the USA, we’ve got quite a heat wave thanks to a large dome of high pressure that’s parked itself over the region. Buckle up and enjoy the ride, this is going nowhere soon. Recent trends show much of the severe weather activity is occurring in the northern plains which is the climatological norm. Before we begin, I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! There’s plenty of interesting reads in many areas, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA is racing to finish a new Mars rover, and the mission just got a launch and land date. The new rover will leave Earth by August 2020, and in February of 2021, it will hit the surface of the Red Planet to search for signs of life.

In this research project, the thick clouds that cover Venus are no hindrance to exploring the surface of the planet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A bizarre yet fascinating look at what happens when lava swallows a tree.

An interesting read on how some San Andreas fault earthquakes in the western USA can be triggered by the gravitational forces of the sun and Earth’s moon.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. The largest offshore wind farm in the USA could be coming soon to New York, if the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) approves the project as expected.

This is only bound to get worse. The largest freshwater lake in Florida, USA is covered in a scum of blue-green algae which is also traveling down nearby waterways and out to the coastline. Unfortunately, Florida’s current governor has done nothing in the past to prevent this environmental mess.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A big “Congratulations” to Jim Cantore who’s celebrating thirty years at The Weather Channel!

An excellent read that’s worth a re-post. “Meteorologists shouldn’t just ‘stick to the weather,’ they should openly discuss climate change.”

Is climate change truly here to stay? Yes…and here’s a list of seven (of many more) reasons why.

The true power of many becoming one can be invaluable. “Thirty-One Top Scientific Societies Speak With One Voice On Global Climate Change.”

Are the potential health dangers of climate change enough to make the public sit up and take notice? By some accounts, the answer is in the affirmative.

In order to reach climate goals & the 2°C (3.6°F) threshold, new technology is needed ASAP.

Unfortunately, billion dollar weather and climate disasters are becoming more commonplace…and it’s not because of inflation.

For those of us who live in large urban areas, this is no surprise. USA cities are becoming dangerously hot during our scorching summers.

You’ve probably been enjoying this year’s El Niño without realizing it. If your weather as of late has been pleasurable, hopefully you enjoyed it while it lasted.

Have you ever wondered how a NOAA National Weather Service office layout is setup? Here’s some fine examples.

Why are Swedes happy about a 25C “heatwave?” Simple…those kind of temperatures are rare in Scandinavia…even in the middle of summer.

Thanks a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For June 28 – July 5, 2015

Greetings to one and all! For those of you who just celebrated the USA’s Independence Day and Canada Day, I hope you had a great holiday weekend! Let us all take a moment and be grateful for the freedom and liberty we so often take for granted.

United States Declaration Of Independence Quote

Happy-independence-day-america-2016

Here’s a nice four-minute video with a concise overview of the USA’s Declaration of Independence. It’s truly an amazing document. Also amazing is the fact that the largest portion of our Declaration of Independence is a twenty-eight count indictment of the late 18th century British monarchy, and specifically King George III.

Summer has a firm grip on much of the plains states across North America. Unfortunately, at least at my location, triple digit head indexes have become the norm several weeks earlier than usual. Otherwise, there’s plenty to check out this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

EDUCATION

Many universities and employers are just now realizing what many of us  have known for years. Business schools are cranking out robots that are lackluster employees because of a deficit of liberal arts (and specifically science) courses as part of their curriculum.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Until Galileo kick-started modern astronomy in the early 1600s, the record of the sun’s activities was basically blank—or so scientists thought.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Juno spacecraft has finally reached Jupiter and will begin studying its mysterious atmosphere and what lays underneath.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The 2016 wildfire season in the western USA is just getting underway…and already it’s gotten an unfortunate head start.

When close to a record-breaking 36 million Americans took their holiday road trips this past Independence Day weekend, they were part of what’s quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation.

Would you like to lower your summer utility bills? I’ve tried all of these tips and trust me, they work!

A sobering video on the irrevocable link between air pollution and human health. No one is immune.

While on the topic of air pollution, an overwhelming majority of urban dwellers have concerns over air quality and it’s effects on public health.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An encouraging and thought-provoking read on six steps that we can take now that may help slow the progression of climate change.

Another warning from the “silent killer.” “Heat Waves Could Bring Lots More Deaths To NYC.”

I couldn’t have said this better myself. Top science groups have told climate change deniers in Congress to, “knock it off.”

There’s not been much news as of late regarding our Earth’s ozone layer. Fortunately, it’s been good news.

Nothing personal, but folks who’ve lived in the interior western USA may not fully understand what “air-you-can-wear” humidity is like.

“Defenses against storms and floods, built on past events, will fail unless emergency planners use forward-looking data that account for rapid climate change.”

Congratulations to the Wall Street Journal for demonstrating yet again that their sympathies reside with climate change denialists.

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad to have you along and hope that the information you’ll find here is helpful, educational, and useful in many ways. Glad you’re aboard!

Cheers!

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