Tag Archives: public policy

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links Week In Review For August 6 – 13, 2018

Greetings to one and all! If you’re dealing with summer, I hope you’re keeping your cool. We’ve got several more weeks of warm weather ahead and many of my colleagues are ready for a cool-down. Here are this week’s top links…including a revised look at this year’s Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook.

EDUCATION

This is a habit that I’ve been actively involved in for over thirty-five years. I highly recommend it! “Why You Should Surround Yourself With More Books Than You’ll Ever Have Time To Read.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

With climate change comes public health hazards. The spread of diseases from ticks, mosquitoes, and flies will increase exponentially globally.

We can only hope that this will catch on in other countries…the sooner the better. New Zealand will ban single-use plastic bags over the next year.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This is very good news for areas prone to Atlantic basin tropical cyclones. “NOAA Forecasters Lower Atlantic Hurricane Season Prediction. Regardless, the National Hurricane Center still encourages people to prepare in spite of the outlook. It only takes one storm…and that one storm could be a major disaster.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows approximately 30.2% of the USA and 76.7 million people experiencing some level of drought conditions.

U.S. Drought Monitor

A new report from the government of Puerto Rico claims a Hurricane Maria death toll of over 1,400 people. As is often the case in disasters of this magnitude, an exact death toll may never be known.

The critical nature of recent data on climate change may induce a sense of submission. The truth is that giving up is the last thing humanity can afford to do. Now is the time to be more proactive than ever.

The dangers of summer heat are highly underrated. Here’s an excellent overview of just five of the effects of these horrendous heat waves that much of the Northern Hemisphere has been dealing with in recent weeks.

PUBLIC POLICY

The majority of United States citizens feel it is essential for the USA to remain a global leader in space exploration…however…”majorities say monitoring climate or tracking asteroids should be a top NASA priority; only 13% say the same of putting astronauts on the moon.” I couldn’t agree more.

The politics behind California’s wildfires is not pretty. It certainly doesn’t help the people who are suffering in ways most of us can’t comprehend. Not surprisingly, some powers-that-be prefer to point fingers of blame rather than take responsible and rational actions to help Americans they’re sworn to protect.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “thank you” to my long-time followers. It’s great to have you along!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For March 26 – April 2, 2018

Greetings everyone! If spring is on the menu for your location, I hope that it’s meeting your expectations and the weather is clement in your area. For much of North America, spring also means the peak of the annual severe weather season. We’ll have a bit of safety info on that. There’s plenty of other topics to look over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Taking into consideration the recent events concerning social media, some are wondering if it can be saved from itself?

If you think that Facebook and Google have a lot of information on you, this article on just how much will make you even more wary about what you share.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news from NASA. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is in final preparations for its April 16 launch to, “find undiscovered worlds around nearby stars, providing targets where future studies will assess their capacity to harbor life.”
Here’s a question that we’ll likely never have the answer to. “Is Humanity Unusual In The Cosmos?”
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
A change in perspective can make an amazing difference. “Satellite Images From Highly Oblique Angles Are Pretty Mindblowing.”
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
For all the good it has done, the Paris Climate Accord has its flaws that need to be examined and debated closely. “The debate lies in exactly how the Paris climate target is defined and measured, which has not been precisely established.”
While not comprehensive or made for the advanced weather aficionado, this basic cloud guide is a good starting point for anyone with a basic interest in weather and wants to know more about how clouds can convey what’s happening in our atmosphere.
Signs of spring are finally showing up in Sweden where some locations, having gone without much sunlight for months, will get above freezing for the first time since last autumn.
The ice sheets in Greenland give us a clear idea of what is happening with climate change. Unfortunately, they’re melting at a rate faster than at any other time in 400 years.
WEATHER SAFETY
With the arrival of the severe weather season in North America, it’s time to prepare for some of the planet’s most volatile weather. Ready.gov has a good springboard for starting a family plan for many types of disasters.
Here’s a simple overview of the Storm Prediction Center’s severe weather risk categories, the extent of storms expected, and the impact that you should prepare for.
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/SPC
Your mobile device can be an invaluable source of severe weather information. Be sure to follow reliable and official sources of information.
Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS
PUBLIC POLICY
The current train wreck at the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency gets worse with every new story. Pruitt and company get more paranoid and histrionic every day.
While focused on Canada, it would not be surprising to see this come to fruition in many other countries. “‘We’re Talking Very Big Bucks’: New Bill Could Put Oil Companies On The Hook For Climate Change Costs.”
Last but not least, the current USA presidential administration intends to eliminate NASA’s climate research programs. “Critics say NASA’s Earth Science Division is a waste of taxpayer dollars and a distraction from the agency’s core mission of space exploration. But NASA has a critical role to play in understanding human-caused climate change, by operating satellites that monitor the earth’s forests, deserts, oceans and atmosphere.”
That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long time followers…near and far. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.
Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 20 – 26, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s spring here in the Northern Hemisphere and, in spite of the snow that still remains, many areas are greening and warming up nicely. Across the southern states and great plains of North America, the severe weather season has been off to a rather quiet start…but that could change. There’s always plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re incensed about the latest Facebook FUBAR, you’re not alone…and chances are your privacy was compromised in a major way. Stopping Facebook from tracking you isn’t easy, but with persistence it can be done.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

This amazing graphic could not have been made without the help of a nationwide network of citizen science. It’s a few words of encouragement for folks who are anxiously awaiting spring…but the amazing graphics are possible only through folks who collect data on blooming plants and trees in spring.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

More than a half-year after Hurricane Harvey devastated a large portion of Houston, (the USA’s fourth-largest city), the extent of the storm’s environmental impact is beginning to surface, while questions about the long-term consequences for human health remain unanswered.
An unsettling read about the massive plastic garbage patch in the Pacific ocean. Sadly, this patch is only one of several.
Regardless of where you live, this is good news…and hopefully new wind energy records will become commonplace.
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Though weather and climate are close in many ways, there are significant differences that are important to understand.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

The World Meteorological Organization has released a new State Of The Climate report. This is an important read (40 page PDF document) so settle in and get up to date on the latest in climate science.

Speaking of climate, it’s been a while since the IPCC issued its latest report. In the past five years, we’ve learned a lot about climate…here’s a great update.

There’s an irrevocable link between wildlife, nature, and climate. Nations fighting climate change must understand this in order to meet the requirements of the Paris Accord.

If you’ve got a lot of snow to move, might as well make a mountain out of it all. I wonder how long it’ll take for all of this to melt?

PUBLIC POLICY

Truth stranger than fiction. “Web of Power: Cambridge Analytica And The Climate Science Denial Network Lobbying For Brexit And Trump.”

Apparently someone who should know better is in desperate need of a refresher course on the scientific method. “Scott Pruitt Will Restrict The EPA’s Use Of Legitimate Science.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along!

Cheers!

—————————————————————————————-

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! For many of you, winter is holding on with a firm grip. Much of the northeastern USA has taken a beating lately from repeated rounds of snow, wind, and generally very unpleasant weather. For those folks, spring can’t arrive soon enough. As for the rest of us, it’s a mixed bag. A few severe weather episodes have occurred in the southern part of North America…and there will be much more to come. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE & EDUCATION

Contrary to popular opinion, university scientists are indeed interested in teaching. From personal experience, all of my university professors were keenly devoted to conveying knowledge.

Print books are still hard to beat. In spite of the convenience of mobile devices, holding the printed page in your hands has a special feel to the words and images within the covers. As a voracious reader, print will always be my personal preference.

Interesting perspective that is somewhat unsettling. Many people don’t understand science (bad), yet want their children to take an interest in it (very good).

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Here’s a handy climate-friendly car guide that might help you choose a model that has a smaller carbon footprint than what most of us are driving.

Smart phones have been an amazing addition to technology. But sometimes, we all can go a bit overboard in how we use them. Here’s a thought provoking read on breaking your phone addiction.

As the saying goes, “A lie will circle the globe before the truth has a chance to cross the street.” Fake news, whether from nefarious interlopers or hyperbole/adrenaline junkies, is at an epidemic level…with no end in sight.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science read. “Citizen Science Birding Data Passes Scientific Muster.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s an unavoidable connection between trees and climate change. By some accounts, trees are in trouble. “New evidence shows that the climate is shifting so quickly, it’s putting many of the world’s trees in jeopardy.”

With the temptations of computer games and binge watching television, kids are often inside when they could be exploring some amazing facets of our natural world. Here are five reasons why kids need to spend more time with nature.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you aware of the different types of tornadoes? Not all tornadoes or vortexes are associated with supercell thunderstorms. he most important thing to remember is that each of these carries its own hazards…regardless of how benign it may appear.

Infographic courtesty NOAA/NWS

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA for February 2018. The main takeaway…above normal temperatures and dry to drought conditions for much of the USA. The report also covers the winter of 2017-2018. The maps below show the departure from normal for temperature and precipitation.

Maps courtesy NOAA

Thundersnow is a spectacular event to witness. Here in Oklahoma, robust snowstorms are often laced with lightning. Here’s an excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the science behind thundersnow.

Here’s a very nice video that’s concise and aimed at the layperson who may not understand the technicalities of climate change and it’s connection to extreme weather events. “Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Wetter. Here’s How We Know.”

One sobering reminder of the impact of climate change is the number of billion dollar disasters that are increasing with stunning frequency.

Conveying climate change information to the general public can be an occupational hazard for broadcast meteorologists, In spite of the challenges, many are successfully passing on important information that, for their own good, the public needs to know.

If each spring in the Northern Hemisphere looks a bit warmer with each passing year, it’s not your imagination.

Up to 41 million Americans may live in flood zones…and millions of them may not even know about it.

Here’s an excellent read on the priceless value that weather satellites provide to meteorologists and the challenges that come with the technology.

PUBLIC POLICY

This is one of those scenarios that reveals the true inefficiency of bureaucracy that so infuriates an INTJ personality like me. “The U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board has not met in at least six months, and some of its members say it’s being sidelined to avoid getting in the way of agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s anti-regulatory agenda.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…I’m glad you’re along for the fun. For my followers who have been with me through thick and thin, I appreciate every one of you. Your loyalty is not taken for granted.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For February 26 – March 5, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s severe weather safety awareness week in many locations…and we’re no exception. With this week’s post, we’ll take a look at some essential safety links that pertain to thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, flooding, and NOAA weather radios. It’s also been a wild weather week across much of North America and parts of Europe. A powerful Nor’Easter pounded the northeastern states and much of northern Europe was impacted by a substantial winter storm.  Many other subjects to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in astronomy…or how our universe came to be. “A Potentially Game-Changing Message From The Dawn Of Time.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It would be nice to see this put into action within Oklahoma. “The risk of human-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth’s crust, according to new research.”

Here’s some very good renewable energy news. More than 100 cities around the world are getting most of their electricity from renewable energy sources. Furthermore, the number of cities that get at least 70% of their electricity from renewables has more than doubled in the last three years.

Oklahoma is the number 2 state in the USA in wind energy…but that’s not stopping some who are threatened by those facts from instigating some actions that are dubious in integrity.

Some of the most spectacular and priceless natural gems in the USA are potentially under the gun if the current presidential administration removes their protection.

Speaking of protection, a re-organization at the USA’s EPA could remove a federal environmental office that works to test the effects of chemical exposure on adults and children and merge it with other EPA offices.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Recent warming in the Arctic is alarming to that point that many climate scientists are taken aback at the level at which it’s occurring. The Arctic warming which is technically known as a warm air intrusion, may be somewhat common in the Arctic climate. However, climate scientists say this event was not like previously ‘normal’ climate events.

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, and Lightning: Nature’s Most Violent Storms.

The Storm Prediction Center’s Online Tornado FAQ.

Tornado Safety by Roger Edwards of the Storm Prediction Center.

Safety info about derechoes…powerful and dangerous thunderstorms with hurricane force winds.

From the American Red Cross: Severe Weather Safety Tips…plus a myriad of other important information.

Turn Around, Don’t Drown…flooding is one of the most lethal aspects of severe thunderstorms and kills more people annually than tornadoes and lightning combined.

NOAA Weather Radio: for many people, this is their first line of defense during a severe weather event. NOAA weather radios should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Having multiple ways of receive warnings is an essential part of being prepared for severe weather and your mobile device is no exception.

Building a severe weather safety kit is easy. It’s just a matter of following some steps and getting your kit together promptly and having it in location where it can be easily reached.

PUBLIC POLICY

A top EPA regulator has the potential to obliterate environmental protections one small step at a time. Interlopers like this can operate at a level that, if not closely monitored, does a significant amount of damage whose ramifications are not noticed until it’s too late.

That’s a wrap for this week! One last reminder…as with ALL severe weather events, please be sure to follow reliable and official sources of watch and warning information. Your life may depend on it. I’d also like to thank my followers…I’m glad you’re along.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For February 19 – 26, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope that the weather is to your liking wherever you are. February has been interesting across much of North America with record highs set in many eastern states. We’ve also seen a small increase in the number of severe weather events. It’s that time of year to prepare for severe weather and review safety precautions. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you love weather and want to get involved in citizen science, the CoCoRaHS precipitation network is an excellent way to collect valuable data.

PALEOBIOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

A fascinating read on the history of our humble home. “Plants Colonized The Earth 100 Million Years Earlier Than Previously Thought.”

Here’s a fascinating read for my fellow dinosaur fans. “Paleontologists Discovered A Huge Ancient Fossils Trove In Bears Ears National Monument.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Are Americans hitting their breaking point on the environment? It appears that is the case.

Can you reduce or do without plastics in your life? Some have tried…and found it challenging.

Floating wind farms are becoming a major source of power in many locations. With many countries having windy areas relatively close to shore, this is a trend that has fantastic potential.

Why do kids need to climb trees? For any number of positive reasons including getting in touch (literally) with nature…plants, soil, and those amazing clouds that fill our skies.

Take a look at some amazing photos from the 2017 International Landscape Photographer of the Year contest.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest State Of The Climate Report has been issued. January 2018 was the fifth warmest on record for the globe. The map below is a look at some selected climate anomalies and events for the first month of 2018. The main takeaway…it was a very warm month from a global perspective.

Map courtesy NOAA

For meteorologists, this is BIG news! “Here are five reasons why GOES-S will be such a game-changer for weather forecasts from California to Alaska and beyond.”

Depending on the layout of the city you live in, your urban location has its own weather. The Urban Heat Island Effect plays a bit part in short-term weather and long-term climate data for cities worldwide.

Delaying a reduction in carbon emissions will be nothing short of disastrous. Sea level rise could continue for an estimated 300 years.

Why is studying a continent as remote as Antarctica so important? “What was once thought to be a largely unchanging mass of snow and ice is anything but. Antarctica holds a staggering amount of water.”

According to a new Climate Central analysis, a warming world means our winters will be changing…and we’ll be dealing with less snow and more rain. There’s a good and a bad side to that.

Even though it’s only late February, signs of spring are showing up in  parts of Sweden…including a village where winter never really arrived.

The latest US Drought Portal still shows a significant portion of the southern half of the USA in dry/drought conditions. A detailed look at the drought conditions in a region-by-region format can be found at the US Drought Monitor. Rainfall in many areas has eased the drought conditions temporarily, but the overall trend for much of the Southern Plains is still in Extreme Drought status.

Last but not least…”The publisher of an academic journal beloved by climate science deniers has been revamped to ensure it meets industry standards of peer-review and editorial practice. Its climate science denier editor has also stepped down.” Sometimes you’ve just got to love “karma.”

PUBLIC POLICY

Better late than never. “Republican Lisa Murkowski Says It’s Time For Her Party To Take Climate Change Seriously.”

And that is a wrap for this post! A sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For February 12 – 19, 2018

Greetings to everyone! There’s a little bit of everything to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into weather, citizen science, and would like to contribute to weather research, check out the mPING project where you can send in year round weather reports from the USA and Canada. The app is free, is a very small download, and is available for iOS and Android. Reports can also be sent online from a desktop or laptop computer.

PHYSICS/ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

What came before the Big Bang? There are several theories…and it’s a topic that never gets dull to discuss.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

How do you build a healthy city? It should come as no surprise than a Scandinavian country has the figured out. Take a look at Copenhagen and what Denmark has done for its citizens.

Those of us who take the challenges of living a green lifestyle seriously get our share of strange look and names…but it’s becoming less “weird.”

Speaking of green lifestyles, here’s some food for though on indoor air quality and many of the cleaning products we use every day.

Contrary to the skeptics, wind farms are not the “bird killers” that runs wild in the gossip mills. Such irony that fossil fuel interests that have little interest in environmental and wildlife protection are suddenly wringing their hands over a few birds. Bottom line: wind farms are a threat to their monopoly.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest USA Drought Portal shows that 30.4% and 77.4 million people in the USA are being affected by dry/drought conditions. The most up-t0-date data from the USA Drought Monitor has information on specific regions.

Graphic courtesy US Drought Monitor

Here’s a fascinating look at how powerful hurricanes can have an effect on the Gulf Stream.

A new study shows that you can’t blame hurricanes for most big storm surges that affect the northeastern parts of the USA.

Extreme weather events ranging from heat waves to floods are very likely to increase worldwide if Paris climate agreements are not met.

By some accounts, Americans have a long way to go when it comes to a full comprehension of climate change, but it’s very fortunate that they are increasingly getting their information from climate scientists and ignoring hyperbole via polemics.

PUBLIC POLICY

The current presidential administration has proposed a budget that would target NASA, NOAA, EPA, and much more. That also includes satellites, education programs and science centers.

Power has its privileges…and not a few of us are calling “BS” on EPA head Scott Pruitt’s demand to fly first class when he travels.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…and a thanks to all the folks who have been with me for years. Glad to have you along!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For February 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. Here across much of the Great Plains of the USA, drought conditions persist. Not a few of us, including yours truly, are more than ready for spring…and the beneficial rains that are usually the norm. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project you can participate in from just about anywhere. The Great Backyard Bird Count is scheduled from 16-19 February 2018.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Happy International Darwin Day! Charles Darwin was born on 12 February 1809. Darwin Day celebrates his birthday and, “the achievements of humanity as represented in the acquisition of verifiable scientific knowledge.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft recently took the most distant photograph ever…and it’s amazing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Why is a big utility company embracing wind and solar? In parts of the USA, “wind and solar plants built from scratch now offer the cheapest power available, even counting old coal, which was long seen as unbeatable.”

Part of a monster “fatberg” has gone on display in a London museum. This is the disgustingly ugly side of “out of sight, out of mind” that tells a great deal about how we live. There have been plenty of these in USA cities too.

Speaking of waste, electronic waste (aka E-Waste) is a growing problem with up to 80% not being properly recycled or disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner.

Not only is the Arctic permafrost melting at an alarming rate due to climate change, but the permafrost holds a dangerous amount of mercury.

These images of rare species from unexplored area of Antarctic seabed “highlight need to protect life in one of the most remote places on the planet.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

NOAA has just released a detailed report on January 2018 in the USA. The first month of the new year brought (among other things) the largest drought footprint in nearly four years to the USA.

Below is a NOAA map of significant climate anomalies and events for January 2018.

Here’s an excellent essay on the complexities of climate change. The most important takeaway is the fact that our planet, and its climate, is not a “black-and-white” issue.

What causes someone to go from being a climate change denialist to someone who is sincerely alarmed about the changes we’re seeing? Read this and find out.

By some government accounts, no decline in the USA’s carbon emissions is expected by 2050. If there was ever a reason to motivate action, this should be it. We’ve no other choice.

Critical thinking is one of the most useful tools one can use to spot false claims, especially in the realm of science. Here’s how it can be beneficial when dealing with climate change denialists.

Spectacular Swedish view at -22C! To get a halo like this, you need just the right amount of everything at the right time.

PUBLIC SAFETY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

When given an evacuation order, many people choose to stay in spite of life-threatening conditions. Here’s an interesting look at a study that gives insight as to why some people don’t follow evacuation orders when presented with the risk of wildfires.

THE QUIXOTIC PUBLIC POLICY

Apparently, global warming will help the human species to flourish. It takes a special level of ignorance to back such a statement…but then again we’re talking about EPA head Scott Pruitt.

Backpedaling at its best. At least it is going in the correct direction. “The Trump Administration Brought A Climate Change Policy Back From The Dead.”

Last but not least, this should come as no surprise. “Fines Against Polluters Drop Sharply Under Trump EPA.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “thank you” to the folks who have been following for some time. I’m glad you’re all along for the ride! More fun to come!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For January 20 – 29, 2018

Greetings to everyone! While winter has many weeks to go in the Northern Hemisphere, our friends south of the equator in Australia have been baking in one of the worst heat waves in quite some time. This post will begin being published on Monday as of today…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

PUBLIC POLICY

The USA is quickly loosing its grip as a worldwide leader in science and technology. “China’s Breathtaking Transformation Into A Scientific Superpower.”

Any government shutdown affects National Weather Service employees. “How A Government Shutdown Affects Your Weather Forecasts Today And In The Future.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Whether you’re into weather, citizen science, or both, the mPING project is a fantastic way for you to send in real-time reports to help in very important weather research.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very handy guide to all of the full moons you hear about.

There’s quite a spectacle on tap for 31 January 2018 when our moon is going to put on quite a show. Here’s to hoping you have a good view!

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Tsunamis are one of the most devastating effects of earthquakes. A new real-time tsunami warning system could save many, many lives in the future.

The National Weather Service has an excellent Tsunami Safety Home Page that has potentially life-saving information if you live in a tsunami prone region.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s nothing like cutting off your nose to spite your face. It’s no secret that our current presidential administration’s tariffs on solar panels will cost the USA’s solar industry thousands of jobs.

At least there’s some good news on the renewables front. Last year, the state of Texas got 18% of its energy from solar and wind power.

And here’s some more good news. “Natural Gas Killed Coal – Now Renewables And Batteries Are Taking Over.”

Here’s a step in the right direction for England addressing the problem of plastic waste. “Network Of Water Refill Points Aims To Tackle Problem.”

Plastic pollution, which is something that can be found all over our planet…even in the middle of oceans…is finally getting some badly needed attention.

This is a bit of a long-read on air quality but a very important one. Air quality is currently the leading threat to public health on a global scale. “The 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental health and ecosystem vitality.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Portal and Drought Monitor shows dry/drought conditions spreading rapidly across much of the USA’s southern plains. As of 17 – 23 January 2018, 76.8 million people in the U.S. and 76.8 in the lower 48 states were experiencing varying degrees of dry conditions.

A very informative and interactive look at USA temperature trends since 1970 from Climate Central.

In this article from Scientific American, climate experts chime on the myth that climate change and rising levels of CO2 would benefit plants.

An excellent read with Katharine Hayhoe. “The True Threat Is The Delusion That Our Opinion Of Science Somehow Alters Its Reality.”

Speaking of altered reality, there are publishers of dubious integrity who are more than glad to publish papers from climate change deniers that are supposedly based on “science.”

There is a new wave of mini low-cost satellites that could vastly improve climate research in general and specifically predictions of weather and climate change.

WINTER SAFETY

Reminder on safety when shoveling snow…there’s a right way to do it with the right tools.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to thank my followers for being a part of this and welcome the new folks. I’m glad you’re along. Remember that the publishing day for this post has now shifted to every Monday afternoon with re-posts on Monday evening and Tuesday morning. It will also be posted on Tornado Quest’s Twitter feed, Facebook page, and Tumblr blog.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For December 16 – 23, 2017

Happy Holidays & “astronomical winter” greetings to one and all! If you’re celebrating, I hope your holiday season is going well. Due to the holidays, this will be an abbreviated post, but has some information that I hope will benefit you, especially in understanding winter weather terms. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s a good read in the critical thinking realm that sets the foundation for many a lively (if not contentious) conversations. If you present facts to someone that are contrary to their beliefs, will they change their mind? We’d like to think so, but chances are they won’t.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a very informative info-graphic from the Storm Prediction Center on winter weather conditions, how they form, and what impacts they can have on you.

Info-graphic courtesy Storm Prediction Center

The latest Global Climate Assessment from NOAA shows our planet had its fifth warmest November on record and its third warmest year to date.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Taking into consideration climate change that will occur in the coming decades, here’s a chilling view of a hypothetical scenario of a major hurricane hitting Miami, Florida in the year 2037.

It’s not likely that the Arctic will ever be the same again. “Using 1,500 years of natural records compiled from lake sediments, ice cores, and tree rings as context, the NOAA report says the Arctic is changing at a rate far beyond what’s occurred in the region for millennia.”

This sounds counter-intuitive, but when you understand why, it makes sense that climate change will increase the amount of snowfall in Alaska.

What is the difference between the meteorological and astronomical seasons? Read this essay to find out!

Here’s an interesting story on looking to the past for clues on how other civilizations that are long gone dealt with climate change and what they can teach us.

PUBLIC POLICY

In recent days, the USA’s CDC received a list of “forbidden” words. At first I thought this must be a sophomoric joke. Sadly enough, it isn’t.

And then there’s this…”More than 700 people have left the Environmental Protection Agency since President Trump took office, a wave of departures that puts the administration nearly a quarter of the way toward its goal of shrinking the agency to levels last seen during the Reagan administration.” To make matters worse, over 200 of them are scientists…and they’re not being replaced.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Holidays” to all my followers and hope, regardless of whether you’re celebrating the holiday season or not, the coming days and new year brings you happiness, good health, and prosperity.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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