Tag Archives: renewable energy

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 16 – 23, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active spring across much of North America in the past few days with everything from severe weather to massive wildfires to blizzard conditions in the mix. Fortunately, those of us who live on this continent are conditioned to expect such extremes as the seasons change. Speaking of seasons changing, here’s one reminder for severe weather safety on the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

As usual, there are plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION/PHYSICS

If you’ve never read “The Feynman Lectures on Physics” and are interested in this essential element of a comprehensive scientific education, you’re in for a treat. The most popular book on physics is now available online.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

The planet we call “home” is an amazing place. Here’s a list of thirteen thing about our humble home that everyone should know.

Here’s some excellent renewable energy news. There are four USA states that are getting over thirty percent of their electrical power from wind…and they are (from a political standpoint) conservative Republican states.

This past 22 April was Earth Day. Here’s a good way to take a look at your personal carbon footprint. The most important factor to keep in mind is that the small changes are often the most important.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

One of the pervasive myths about tornadoes is that they don’t hit cities. In spite of many events, this myth persists to this day. Dr. Marshall Shepherd has written an excellent essay that puts a stake in the heart of a potentially dangerous fallacy.

Here’s a comprehensive review from NOAA of the global climate conditions and events of March 2018.

An interesting new study shows a unique perspective on climate change and how it has affected a climactic boundary.

Many areas in the Northern Hemisphere had a rather cold winter but for the Arctic, there was a very different story.

Do the climates of the past have anything to offer us today? Indeed they do. A keen understanding of past climates helps us understand today’s weather in a myriad of ways.

Here’s a spot-on and very important climate essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Climate Change Or Global Warming? Three Reasons Not To Be Distracted By The Name Game.”

An excellent read and retrospective by Michael E. Mann on Earth Day and the 20th anniversary of the Hockey Stick.

Slowly but surely, the tide is changing in public opinion regarding climate change. “Seventy percent of Americans now accept that climate change is happening, outnumbering those who don’t by a 5 to 1 ratio, according to a new survey by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. More than half of those surveyed, 58 percent, said they also understand global warming is caused mostly by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels.”

This interactive graphic from Climate Central shows data on how the USA has been warming ever since the first Earth Day.

Finally, here’s some exciting news regarding weather satellites…the capability to map lightning which is critical data for meteorologists.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s good to have you along!

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 20 – 26, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s spring here in the Northern Hemisphere and, in spite of the snow that still remains, many areas are greening and warming up nicely. Across the southern states and great plains of North America, the severe weather season has been off to a rather quiet start…but that could change. There’s always plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re incensed about the latest Facebook FUBAR, you’re not alone…and chances are your privacy was compromised in a major way. Stopping Facebook from tracking you isn’t easy, but with persistence it can be done.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

This amazing graphic could not have been made without the help of a nationwide network of citizen science. It’s a few words of encouragement for folks who are anxiously awaiting spring…but the amazing graphics are possible only through folks who collect data on blooming plants and trees in spring.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

More than a half-year after Hurricane Harvey devastated a large portion of Houston, (the USA’s fourth-largest city), the extent of the storm’s environmental impact is beginning to surface, while questions about the long-term consequences for human health remain unanswered.
An unsettling read about the massive plastic garbage patch in the Pacific ocean. Sadly, this patch is only one of several.
Regardless of where you live, this is good news…and hopefully new wind energy records will become commonplace.
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Though weather and climate are close in many ways, there are significant differences that are important to understand.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

The World Meteorological Organization has released a new State Of The Climate report. This is an important read (40 page PDF document) so settle in and get up to date on the latest in climate science.

Speaking of climate, it’s been a while since the IPCC issued its latest report. In the past five years, we’ve learned a lot about climate…here’s a great update.

There’s an irrevocable link between wildlife, nature, and climate. Nations fighting climate change must understand this in order to meet the requirements of the Paris Accord.

If you’ve got a lot of snow to move, might as well make a mountain out of it all. I wonder how long it’ll take for all of this to melt?

PUBLIC POLICY

Truth stranger than fiction. “Web of Power: Cambridge Analytica And The Climate Science Denial Network Lobbying For Brexit And Trump.”

Apparently someone who should know better is in desperate need of a refresher course on the scientific method. “Scott Pruitt Will Restrict The EPA’s Use Of Legitimate Science.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For February 26 – March 5, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s severe weather safety awareness week in many locations…and we’re no exception. With this week’s post, we’ll take a look at some essential safety links that pertain to thunderstorms, tornadoes, lightning, flooding, and NOAA weather radios. It’s also been a wild weather week across much of North America and parts of Europe. A powerful Nor’Easter pounded the northeastern states and much of northern Europe was impacted by a substantial winter storm.  Many other subjects to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in astronomy…or how our universe came to be. “A Potentially Game-Changing Message From The Dawn Of Time.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It would be nice to see this put into action within Oklahoma. “The risk of human-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth’s crust, according to new research.”

Here’s some very good renewable energy news. More than 100 cities around the world are getting most of their electricity from renewable energy sources. Furthermore, the number of cities that get at least 70% of their electricity from renewables has more than doubled in the last three years.

Oklahoma is the number 2 state in the USA in wind energy…but that’s not stopping some who are threatened by those facts from instigating some actions that are dubious in integrity.

Some of the most spectacular and priceless natural gems in the USA are potentially under the gun if the current presidential administration removes their protection.

Speaking of protection, a re-organization at the USA’s EPA could remove a federal environmental office that works to test the effects of chemical exposure on adults and children and merge it with other EPA offices.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Recent warming in the Arctic is alarming to that point that many climate scientists are taken aback at the level at which it’s occurring. The Arctic warming which is technically known as a warm air intrusion, may be somewhat common in the Arctic climate. However, climate scientists say this event was not like previously ‘normal’ climate events.

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, and Lightning: Nature’s Most Violent Storms.

The Storm Prediction Center’s Online Tornado FAQ.

Tornado Safety by Roger Edwards of the Storm Prediction Center.

Safety info about derechoes…powerful and dangerous thunderstorms with hurricane force winds.

From the American Red Cross: Severe Weather Safety Tips…plus a myriad of other important information.

Turn Around, Don’t Drown…flooding is one of the most lethal aspects of severe thunderstorms and kills more people annually than tornadoes and lightning combined.

NOAA Weather Radio: for many people, this is their first line of defense during a severe weather event. NOAA weather radios should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Having multiple ways of receive warnings is an essential part of being prepared for severe weather and your mobile device is no exception.

Building a severe weather safety kit is easy. It’s just a matter of following some steps and getting your kit together promptly and having it in location where it can be easily reached.

PUBLIC POLICY

A top EPA regulator has the potential to obliterate environmental protections one small step at a time. Interlopers like this can operate at a level that, if not closely monitored, does a significant amount of damage whose ramifications are not noticed until it’s too late.

That’s a wrap for this week! One last reminder…as with ALL severe weather events, please be sure to follow reliable and official sources of watch and warning information. Your life may depend on it. I’d also like to thank my followers…I’m glad you’re along.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For February 12 – 19, 2018

Greetings to everyone! There’s a little bit of everything to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into weather, citizen science, and would like to contribute to weather research, check out the mPING project where you can send in year round weather reports from the USA and Canada. The app is free, is a very small download, and is available for iOS and Android. Reports can also be sent online from a desktop or laptop computer.

PHYSICS/ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

What came before the Big Bang? There are several theories…and it’s a topic that never gets dull to discuss.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

How do you build a healthy city? It should come as no surprise than a Scandinavian country has the figured out. Take a look at Copenhagen and what Denmark has done for its citizens.

Those of us who take the challenges of living a green lifestyle seriously get our share of strange look and names…but it’s becoming less “weird.”

Speaking of green lifestyles, here’s some food for though on indoor air quality and many of the cleaning products we use every day.

Contrary to the skeptics, wind farms are not the “bird killers” that runs wild in the gossip mills. Such irony that fossil fuel interests that have little interest in environmental and wildlife protection are suddenly wringing their hands over a few birds. Bottom line: wind farms are a threat to their monopoly.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest USA Drought Portal shows that 30.4% and 77.4 million people in the USA are being affected by dry/drought conditions. The most up-t0-date data from the USA Drought Monitor has information on specific regions.

Graphic courtesy US Drought Monitor

Here’s a fascinating look at how powerful hurricanes can have an effect on the Gulf Stream.

A new study shows that you can’t blame hurricanes for most big storm surges that affect the northeastern parts of the USA.

Extreme weather events ranging from heat waves to floods are very likely to increase worldwide if Paris climate agreements are not met.

By some accounts, Americans have a long way to go when it comes to a full comprehension of climate change, but it’s very fortunate that they are increasingly getting their information from climate scientists and ignoring hyperbole via polemics.

PUBLIC POLICY

The current presidential administration has proposed a budget that would target NASA, NOAA, EPA, and much more. That also includes satellites, education programs and science centers.

Power has its privileges…and not a few of us are calling “BS” on EPA head Scott Pruitt’s demand to fly first class when he travels.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…and a thanks to all the folks who have been with me for years. Glad to have you along!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For February 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. Here across much of the Great Plains of the USA, drought conditions persist. Not a few of us, including yours truly, are more than ready for spring…and the beneficial rains that are usually the norm. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project you can participate in from just about anywhere. The Great Backyard Bird Count is scheduled from 16-19 February 2018.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Happy International Darwin Day! Charles Darwin was born on 12 February 1809. Darwin Day celebrates his birthday and, “the achievements of humanity as represented in the acquisition of verifiable scientific knowledge.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft recently took the most distant photograph ever…and it’s amazing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Why is a big utility company embracing wind and solar? In parts of the USA, “wind and solar plants built from scratch now offer the cheapest power available, even counting old coal, which was long seen as unbeatable.”

Part of a monster “fatberg” has gone on display in a London museum. This is the disgustingly ugly side of “out of sight, out of mind” that tells a great deal about how we live. There have been plenty of these in USA cities too.

Speaking of waste, electronic waste (aka E-Waste) is a growing problem with up to 80% not being properly recycled or disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner.

Not only is the Arctic permafrost melting at an alarming rate due to climate change, but the permafrost holds a dangerous amount of mercury.

These images of rare species from unexplored area of Antarctic seabed “highlight need to protect life in one of the most remote places on the planet.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

NOAA has just released a detailed report on January 2018 in the USA. The first month of the new year brought (among other things) the largest drought footprint in nearly four years to the USA.

Below is a NOAA map of significant climate anomalies and events for January 2018.

Here’s an excellent essay on the complexities of climate change. The most important takeaway is the fact that our planet, and its climate, is not a “black-and-white” issue.

What causes someone to go from being a climate change denialist to someone who is sincerely alarmed about the changes we’re seeing? Read this and find out.

By some government accounts, no decline in the USA’s carbon emissions is expected by 2050. If there was ever a reason to motivate action, this should be it. We’ve no other choice.

Critical thinking is one of the most useful tools one can use to spot false claims, especially in the realm of science. Here’s how it can be beneficial when dealing with climate change denialists.

Spectacular Swedish view at -22C! To get a halo like this, you need just the right amount of everything at the right time.

PUBLIC SAFETY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

When given an evacuation order, many people choose to stay in spite of life-threatening conditions. Here’s an interesting look at a study that gives insight as to why some people don’t follow evacuation orders when presented with the risk of wildfires.

THE QUIXOTIC PUBLIC POLICY

Apparently, global warming will help the human species to flourish. It takes a special level of ignorance to back such a statement…but then again we’re talking about EPA head Scott Pruitt.

Backpedaling at its best. At least it is going in the correct direction. “The Trump Administration Brought A Climate Change Policy Back From The Dead.”

Last but not least, this should come as no surprise. “Fines Against Polluters Drop Sharply Under Trump EPA.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “thank you” to the folks who have been following for some time. I’m glad you’re all along for the ride! More fun to come!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For January 6 – 13, 2018

Greetings to one and all! I hope that everyone in North America is handling the current cold snap well and you’re staying warm. There are at least two different viewpoints regarding this cold weather that will make for good reading. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Recent evaluation of these amazing images of Mars shows the existence of huge water reserves.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

This was a long time coming. The UK has finally banned microbeads in cosmetics and personal care products.

In this day and age of bad news and non-stop contentiousness, here’s some good news on the renewable energy front. “USA Utility-Scale Solar, Wind Capacity Could Double By 2020.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA climate report is out…2017 was the third warmest year on record. Even worse, it was the costliest year on record for weather and climate disasters.

Here’s an excellent read on how the recent (and ongoing as of this post date) cold snaps across North America are clearly linked to a warming Arctic region.

A strong polar vortex (left, from December 2013) is centered over the Arctic. A weakened polar vortex (right, from January 2014) allows cold air to dip farther south. Credit: NOAA

In another story, here’s another take on the January 2017 cold snap. Ultimately, it’s up to the reader to weigh the information and, with critical thinking skills, form their own opinion.

The latest Drought Monitor shows dry to drought conditions affecting up to 67 million Americans in the contiguous USA.

NOAA’s GOES-13 weather satellite had been effectively retired. It’s like losing an old friend, but the new generation of satellites coming in the near future will be worth it.

Puerto Rico officials are re-evaluating the death toll from Hurricane Maria. As is the case all too often, it’s unfortunate that many deaths will be unreported and no exact death toll will ever be known.

Adding salt to the wound. After devastating wildfires, parts of California have been dealt another blow with deadly mudslides that have killed over a dozen people.

Here’s an excellent overview from Capital Weather Gang on how the California Thomas fire set the stage for the deadly mudslides.

And that is a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to my followers…old and new…in social media. It’s great to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 11 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! Thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re having good weather wherever you are. Here across much of North America, we’re getting a touch of autumn…some areas are enjoying the spectacular fall foliage, others are still reeling from devastating hurricanes and wildfires. There’s plenty to look over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

The US state of New Mexico has reversed course (somewhat) on a recent public education issue with startling changes to proposed science standards. In the 21st century, it’s hard to believe that any of these changes were even proposed.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

One underrated hazard from natural disasters is the prevalence of PTSD which, all too often, can be permanently disabling.

A little social science combined with technology. “Our Toxic Smartphone Addiction.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An excellent video summary from the BBC on why the California wildfires are so deadly.

There’s a definite connection between climate change and the California wildfires. Here’s what is know so far.

As of 20 October 2017, California wildfires have caused over one billion US dollars in damages.

This is an excellent perspective on the California wildfires. “Promoting the right kind of fire—and smarter development—is safer and more cost-effective than fighting a losing battle.”

While part of the recent California wildfires can be attributed to climate change and natural causes, humans must be willing to accept responsibility for our part.

Using plastics is almost unavoidable…and can be precarious. Here’s an excellent guide on what kinds of plastics to chose and which ones to avoid altogether.

Why are scientists so bad at recycling? Unfortunately, many laboratory scenarios have certain challenges…but zero waste can be achieved.

In Europe, the 2014 death toll from air pollution is estimated to have been as high as 500,000 early deaths.

The potential for wind energy worldwide is immense…and now’s the time to start harnessing this renewable source of clean energy.

A small town in the very Red state of Texas is the perfect example of what an American eco-friendly city of the future looks like.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has been remarkable. 2017 became the first year in more than a century and only the fourth on record with 10 consecutive Atlantic storms reached hurricane strength.

Read how and why Ophelia was the strongest storm to hit Ireland in almost half a century.

An interesting read from Climate Central on the effect climate change is having on fall foliage.

The watch and waiting game for La Niña continues. “The October ENSO forecast says La Niña conditions are favored during the fall and winter 2017-18, but at press time the ocean-atmosphere system didn’t quite meet the criteria for a La Niña Advisory.”

Here’s a look at this week’s USA Drought Monitor. Here’s a detailed region-by-region look at current drought conditions.

The road to recovery for Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria is going to be a long one that will take years.

PUBLIC POLICY

No words to describe this continuation of the train wreck. “In announcing his abandonment of the Clean Power Plan, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt boasted, “The war on coal is over.” That means the war on children has begun.”

Here’s another “head scratcher” that isn’t really surprising. The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency has scrubbed their website of references to ‘climate change.’

This is an interestingly disconcerting development. “Trump Pics Weather Company Chief to Lead NOAA.”


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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 19 – 26, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We’ve just had the autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and for some folks, a chill is in the air and foliage is changing to the traditional autumn colors. South of the equator, spring is in the air as their season begins to warm. The big weather story as of late has been the hurricane activity in the Atlantic…we’ll touch on that and a few other topics…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

A surprising read for my fellow dinosaur enthusiasts. “Plant-eating dinosaurs usually found plenty to eat, but occasionally they went looking for a nutritional boost.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Unlike hurricanes, winter storms, or severe convective weather events, there is no reliable or easy way to predict a significant earthquake.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

Hurricanes often bring about or exacerbate bad environmental issues. Hurricane Maria and its effects on Puerto Rico are a good example.

In spite of many naysayers, clean energy is one way to circumnavigate aging and poorly maintained energy infrastructures in the wake of many natural disasters.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The weather forecasting done today is more accurate than ever but by some accounts, the public takes issue with that.

If you live in the USA and love summer, you’re probably enjoying the longer hot spells. Be warned, the details will prove that longer summers aren’t good.

Has the Atlantic hurricane season been active? Yes. Is it the worst hurricane season ever? Hardly. Not even close.

The recovery from Hurricane Maria will take months in Puerto Rico…which has not experienced a major hurricane for almost ninety years.

The current, and long-lasting, effects from Hurricane Maria can best be described as a humanitarian emergency for Puerto Rico.

Very well said in regards to Hurricane Maria. “To deny climate change is to procrastinate while the earth sinks; it is to deny a truth we have just lived.”

Here’s an exceptionally shocking collection of photos from Puerto Rico that will give you an idea of just how bad the current crisis is.

From Carbon Brief…Factcheck: Climate Models Have Not “Exaggerated” Global Warming.

Truth stranger than fiction. The USA’s EPA has tapped the Heartland Institute for “non-alarmist” climate “experts” for various purposes…similar to having the fox guard the henhouse.

PUBLIC POLICY

The train wreck continues. The unfortunate part is many folks on all points of the political spectrum have sincere and honest environmental concerns. “GOP Runs Roughshod Over Democratic, Environmental Safeguards.”

The current EPA’s Clean Power Plan is due for drastic changes…and nothing good can come of this.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 15 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking in your location. The big storms across the United States this week has been the solar eclipse, the first significant one for almost a century. The tropical Atlantic has been somewhat more active as of late. The major concern at this date (22 August 2017) is the remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey which could bring substantial rainfall totals to much of Texas and possibly Louisiana. There are plenty of other topics to touch on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

The presence of the troll in social media is nothing new. The sad fact is most anyone can (during a momentary lapse of decorum) can become one.

PUBLIC HEALTH

There is a myriad of hazards from weather and climate conditions. Depending on the time of year and location, bugs can be an even greater hazard…many of which spread diseases for which there is no cure.

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s an essay that’s quite good in reminding us of the fact that science, in its best form, is its harshest critic. It’s all part of how the scientific method works.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

After thousands of years, solar eclipses are still fascinating to scientists…and that’s a very good thing!

If you get the chance to watch another eclipse, please remember to take the necessary safety precautions.

If you missed the 21 August 2017 eclipse, don’t worry. There are several others in the coming years that will pass across North America.

Over the next 50 years, you can travel to a number of locations around the globe to witness an eclipse.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. “The increasing presence of wind and solar in the United States helped prevent the premature deaths of up to 12,700 people between 2007 and 2015.”

In consideration of the abundance of bad news, here are some amazingly beautiful images of our incredible home that will offer a visual respite.

 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For months, several Atlantic hurricane season outlooks have stated that 2017 would be an active year. This still could come to fruition. The most important element to remember; regardless of how many storms form, it only takes one tropical cyclone landfall to make for a major disaster.

Here’s a look at tropical cyclone formation outlooks from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center from 23 August to 5 September 2017. An active period is anticipated in portions of both the Pacific and Atlantic.

Graphic courtesy Climate Prediction Center

In California, scientists are taking the reigns of climate research in their own hands. Considering the current hostilities toward climate research, this may be necessary for many other USA states.

It may be August, but for parts of Sweden, it’s time for a touch of snow.

Studying climates of the past (paleoclimatology) is important because it can give us glimpses into the climates of the future.

PUBLIC POLICY

Considering all parties involved, this should come as no surprise to those of us who live in Oklahoma. The Sooner State’s new Attorney General is opposed to the proposed Oklahoma wind farm that could be the largest in the United States.

Nothing good can come from this. “US president Donald Trump’s administration has disbanded a government advisory committee intended to help the country prepare for a changing climate.”

In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence and a global consensus, some of climate change’s most vulnerable victims are the most fervent skeptics of science.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun. Tornado Quest covers a diverse range of topics including environmental issues, climate change, renewable energy sources, and much more. You’ll find much to enjoy, or provoke thought, with our accounts on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For August 8 – 16, 2017

Greetings everyone! It’s been a busy weather and science news week with a story on virtually any topic from A to Z. Recent severe weather events, including the 6 August 2017 Tulsa, OK tornado have kept me busy & delayed this post by one day. So…without further delay, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

 

EDUCATION

This isn’t strictly limited to science education, but is applicable to everyone…regardless of your occupation. “9 Super Successful People Share Their Reading Habits.” As a voracious reader, I can attest to the validity of the information within the article.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re into weather and citizen science, one way you can contribute is taking part in the mPING crowdsourcing project. Whether using a desktop or mobile device, you can contribute valuable data year round to the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) to help weather research. The mobile app is free and available for iOS or Android.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Regardless of where you live and what hazards you may be susceptible to, an emergency kit is essential to any home or workplace. They’re easier to put together than you think too!

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

Conveying science to the general public is a daunting challenge. The answer to this challenge is in using less “jargon” and explaining the basic facts.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

An interesting look at how the solar energy industry will handle the 21 August 2017 solar eclipse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

What does the USA’s National Weather Service do? More than you can imagine. Here’s a great overview of a government agency that quite often saves lives in addition to putting together your local forecast.

Here’s the latest US Drought Monitor. Dry conditions continue to worsen across the north central states.

Graphic courtesy @DroughtCenter

NOAA has just released an updated 2017 Atlantic hurricane season outlook. There are some substantial changes from the outlook in May. Remember, an outlook is not a forecast. The bottom line, a more active season is now expected.

Graphic courtesy National Weather Service Caribou, Maine

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report reiterates what many of us have suspected the past few months. 2016 surpassed 2015 as the warmest year in 137 years of record keeping.

 

The State Of The Climate map below shows a startling increase in global surface temperatures. From the report, “Aided by the strong El Niño early in the year, the 2016 annual global surface temperature observed record warmth for a third consecutive year, with the 2016 annual global surface temperature surpassing the previous record of 2015.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA National Center For Environmental Information

Climate Central has an excellent read on the recent data on 2016 being a record year for global climate change.

As global temperature trends rise, are we willing to face the role current generations play in the lives of future ones and how climate change will affect their world?

A new analysis with data from NASA shows the vast El Niño weather pattern of 2014–16 caused tropical forests to produce approximately 3 billion tons of carbon. That’s equivalent to nearly 20% of the emissions produced during the same period by making cement and burning fossil fuels.

If you think that heat waves in cities across the USA are longer than in years past, you’d be correct. Extended streaks of heat, most likely in urban areas due to the heat island effect, are becoming more common.

Climate change deniers had a field day with a recent SNAFU within a New York Times story.

After 30 years, the challenge of dealing with the Earth’s ozone problem still remains very elusive.

New Orleans is once again dealing with floods. This city, which largely rests below sea level, will continue to have flooding problems until either a proper infrastructure is in place, or the city no longer exists.

After the Tulsa tornado of 6 August 2017, there was quite an unnecessary backlash and reaction to the “tornado sirens” not being sounded in the city of Tulsa. This was the correct decision. Here’s an infographic on the basis of what these archaic toys are meant for. Opinions vary on the usefulness of these sirens, but they have many faults and are (at best) Cold War era technology that is, at best, minimally useful. My sound advice: forget sirens even exist. There are far more effective means of getting potential life-saving weather warnings.

Graphic courtesy National Weather Service Tulsa, Oklahoma

PUBLIC POLICY

This should come as no surprise to those of us in Oklahoma who are familiar with our former attorney general’s proclivities. “Scott Pruitt Brushes Off ‘So-Called Settled Science’ On Conservative Radio Show.” Keep in mind that this individual is now the head of the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency. He also doesn’t want to “politicize science,” but due to the nature of our rapidly changing society, that can’t be done.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the ride!

Cheers!

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