Tag Archives: science friday

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 8 – 16, 2017

Greeting’s to everyone! If you’re celebrating the holiday weekend, I hope it’s a good one. For those not celebrating, I hope your spring/autumn is going as well as possible. Here in the USA, the severe weather season is in full swing this week with several days of challenging forecasts. Also, don’t forget the March For Science is coming up on 22 April 2017! This week’s post will be a bit on the brief side due to a developing severe weather setup…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A disconcerting privacy read. In the process of trying to guard privacy rights, some people are trying to “trash their tracks.” Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. Polluting your web history won’t keep you from having your rights violated by nefarious opportunists.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a good read on spring-time citizen science projects from SciStarter! Why sit on the sidelines when you can take part? Citizen scientists add valuable data to research projects that, in most situations, would be difficult to obtain.

Citizen science and weather go hand-in-hand exceptionally well! Here are four ways you can enjoy citizen science get involved and contribute valuable weather and climate data to data bases and research!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It seems as if wind energy gets less expensive month by month…and that’s some very good news!

The drought in California may by “officially” over, but it’s best to not think it won’t happen again.

Speaking of California, here’s some very good renewables news. On one day in March, 2017, California got fifty percent of it’s electricity from solar power.

NASA has a new Night Light Map that shows patterns of human settlement across our humble home.

Challenging times ahead for the EPA. With air quality in the USA still problematic, the health of millions is at stake.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If this past winter seemed short for much of North America, you weren’t imagining things. For the southwestern USA states in particular, spring is coming earlier every year.

This is the kind of record breaking data that doesn’t bring about smiles. We’ve yet another record breaking month for low Arctic sea ice.

Here’s a very informative Science Friday interview with climate scientist Michael Mann on his recent House Committee on Science, Space, & Technology hearing testimony.

Time is running short. “We Must Reach Peak Carbon Emissions By 2020, Says Former UN Climate Chief.

Weather balloons carry instrument packages that supply invaluable data for forecasting and observations. Check out this video of a weather balloon exploding at 100,000 feet!

The Heartland Institute is at it again…this time will a well oiled PR campaign based on unfounded accusations sans evidence.

PUBLIC POLICY

NASA continues to be the target of budget cuts that, in the long run, will mean the demise of valuable data that benefits us all.

Now that former Oklahoma AG Scott Pruitt is running the USA’s EPA, some climate change denialists are bemoaning that, “he won’t fight.”

While on that topic, the train wreck continues. “Scott Pruitt Calls For An ‘Exit’ From The Paris Accord, Sharpening The Trump White House’s Climate Rift.”

Last but definitely not least, don’t forget the March For Science is only days away on 22 April 2017! Currently, there are over 500 satellite marches that will be taking place the world over!

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…glad you’re along for the fun! Interesting times ahead.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links For November 10 – 17, 2016

Greetings everyone! How’s the weather in your neighborhood this week? Hopefully it’s to your liking. In parts of North America, we’ll be getting a good shot of cold autumn weather for mid November. In spite of that, much of the NOAA outlooks for the next week or so hint at relatively clement weather…which is good if you’ll be doing any traveling for the American Thanksgiving holiday. Regardless, be sure to keep tabs on forecasts for both your local area, destination, and all points in between. Things can and will change unexpectedly. It’s been a very busy week here with my dance card full and my cup runneth over repeatedly…so this post will be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/SCIENCE EDUCATION

The fine folks at Science Friday have compiled a very cool list of six things you can break down right now!

Much to my delight, “the Paris Agreement includes Article 12, calling for the promotion of climate-change education — and the 2030 Agenda includes a comprehensive Sustainable Development Goal on education, with a specific target on education for sustainable development. Education is key to understanding climate change — it is vital to learning to adapt and take action, for today’s generation and tomorrow’s.”

Like it or not, science and politics (both foreign and domestic) go hand in hand more so now than ever before. With the recent USA election in mind, a few prominent scientists shared their reactions.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

For many years, a clean energy transition was said to be much too expensive and troublesome by skeptics and special interests. Furthermore, they claimed it would make consumers’ energy bills very expensive and increase operating costs. They were dead wrong.

Most everything we use can be recycled. If that’s the case, why don’t we do more recycling than we do now?

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Stop what you’re doing and take a deep breath. Chances are that the air you just breathed in and out is polluted.

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ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

October, 2016 was yet another record-breaking month for global temperatures. On its current track, 2016 looks to top 2015 for the year as a whole.

oct-2016-temp-mapFor October 2016, NASA’s map show lots of yellow, orange, and red. Simply put, those are areas where temperatures were well above average for the month. Map courtesy Climate Central & NASA.

Here’s an excellent piece by climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. “Dear President-Elect: Climate Change Is Not A Hoax, And We’re All In This Together.”

La Niña is here and is playing a major role in the ongoing drought and worsening wildfires in the southern USA states.

Regardless of who is president, climate…and nature overall…supersedes any policy designed to focus on short-term goals.

Ending on an aesthetically positive note, take a look at these spectacular autumn vistas captured by drones.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Dec. 6 – 14, 2015

There’s been a wide variety of stories this week, but the big news has been the COP21 Paris Agreement Climate Talks. Though the agreement could have more teeth to it, it’s a start…and the quicker we start being proactive regarding climate change, the better. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Check out this very cool science quiz from the inimitable folks at Science Friday!

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Nothing good can come of this. Twitter is seriously looking into sorting tweets by “presumed relevance” rather than chronological order. The shills would have a field day with this.

Why do people get “unfriended” or “unfollowed” in social media? Here’s an interesting take that focuses on Facebook.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out “Season Spotter” which is a citizen science project that helps identify how climate change effects trees and plants.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Fascinating astronomy read about scientists watching a planet being born.

A “ghost from the past” revisits the early days of the Milky Way.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Air you can cut with a knife and can kill you…literally. Beijing recently issued their first-ever “Red Alert” for horrid air pollution.

Due to the spread of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency improvements, a recent study hints at hope in reducing global CO2 emissions.

One of the most troubling mysteries about sea level rise may have just been solved.

A very sobering yet beautiful view of a glacier’s vanishing act.

It should come as no surprise than a recent undercover Greenpeace investigation, “suggests that fossil fuel companies secretly funnel money into prominent scientists’ pockets to manufacture doubt about mainstream climate change science.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a detailed look at the latest NOAA State Of The Climate report.

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The COP21 closing comments by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon.

A nice info-graphic on key points of COP21.

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I couldn’t have said this better myself. “The opinion piece published in The Wall Street Journal by Matt Ridley and Benny Peiser (“Your Complete Guide to the Climate Debate” Nov. 27, 2015) is riddled with false statements, cherry-picked evidence and misleading assertions about climate science, according to an evaluation by a dozen scientists.”

On a positive note, there are reasons to smile about the Paris climate talks.

Earlier in the Paris climate talks, many wondered what would a strong climate pact look like?

Once ignored, this is a one way street in which backing up is not an option.

Astronauts (past and present) are sending a very clear message about climate change.

The vicious circle of water scarcity and climate change can no longer be ignored.

Speaking of water scarcity, this is what climate change looks like when viewing mountains with little snow.

An excellent read on a not-so-new science. Climatology (the study of climates) has been around for quite some time. So have concerns over global warming and climate change.

The autumn of 2015 will go into the record books as the warmest autumn yet on record for the contiguous USA.

A very important article on building code improvements based on studies done after the Joplin, MO, USA tornado of 22 May 2011.

Do women and men have differing views on climate change? Absolutely.

The two key points about climate change that “skeptics” (aka deniers) always miss.

Why do many United States citizens remain skeptical of climate change in spite of overwhelming scientific evidence? The answer is more within psychology than climatology.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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