Tag Archives: science literacy

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For January 3 – 13, 2017

Greetings everyone! This has been a wild weather week across much of the western USA with California getting tons of snow, more than enough rainfall to put a dent in much of the drought stricken areas, and even an EF-0 tornado near Sacramento. Much of the midwest is bracing for an ice storm and, as of this date (13 January 2017) Ice Storm Warnings are in effect from the northeast Texas panhandle across Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and even into west-central Illinois. As usual, there’s a plethora of other topics to cover. On a personal level, it’s been a “full dance card” week for me with many projects that led me to delay this week’s post. On that note, let’s get started…

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Excellent read from American Scientist magazine on nurturing scientific literacy among the general public. What is meant by ‘scientific literacy?’

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a fascinating story of a man who, in search of a quiet existence in a remote area, inadvertently had a significant effect on climate change science.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read about researchers getting the first look at a very rare kind of galaxy.

A recent study found evidence that the Earth’s moon is older than scientists thought…millions of years earlier than previously believed.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

An idea that, for the sake of our future generations, should come to fruition. “How To Save $23 Trillion Per Year: 100% Renewable Energy For The World.”

Good advice to get the new year started off right. “All too often environmentalism is about stopping doing something, but maybe it’s time to be more active and start doing something instead?”

As of late, the air pollution in China has literally become lethal in nature. This article explains why their air pollution is on the rise again.

China isn’t the only country struggling with severe air pollution problems. Just five days into 2017, London has breached its annual air pollution limit.

Those of us in Oklahoma know all too well what Trump’s EPA nominee Scott Pruitt is capable of. Now, the rest of the country has the chance to find out for themselves.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An interesting read on a study that says the frequency of large-scale tornado outbreaks is increasing in the USA, particularly when it comes to the most extreme events. A link to the original study is included.

Tornadoes in California? You bet. On 10 January 2017, the Sacramento area was visited by an EF-0 tornado.

The latest US Drought Monitor shows over 20% of the contiguous USA is experiencing drought conditions. Recent rain and snowfall throughout the southern states should provide relief that will be evident on the next Drought Monitor.

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There’s often a great deal of confusion about winter weather advisories, watches, and warnings. This NWS infographic has got you covered.

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Are you prepared for an ice storm? If you’re in the areas under an Ice Storm Warning, all the preparations in this info-graphic (courtesy of the St. Louis, MO National Weather Service) should be rushed to completion.

are-you-prepared-for-an-ice-storm

While it may sound bizarre, you can have a blizzard even when it’s not snowing.

In 2016, a total of 121 flood related deaths occurred in the USA. This map from the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center gives a state-by-state breakdown. High death tolls in West Virginia were due to June floods, Texas deaths from flooding in late May.

2016-usa-flood-deaths-map

Just when you thought the new year couldn’t get off to a more bizarre start. “House Science Committee’s Twitter Account Is Now Just Another Climate Science Denial Troll.”

While not necessarily representative of the whole of American society, this survey gives an informative ‘snapshot’ of the daunting challenges atmospheric scientists are up against when trying to convey climate science to the general public.

Another challenge is conveying the risk of climate change to the public. A recent World Economic Forum report ranks climate change and associated environmental factors as the greatest risk facing humanity.

Here’s a disconcerting ‘must-read’ on the anti-science crusade that continues to build steam in the USA. “The Congressional Attack On Science.”

A concise overview from the Capital Weather Gang of ten extreme weather events outside of the USA that killed thousands and cost untold billions during 2016.

In the Antarctic, an ice shelf is breaking up from the inside out. The ice shelf is bigger than New York’s Long Island and when it breaks off, it could result in global sea level rise that threatens many large cities close to the world’s coasts.

THOUGHT PROVOKING

Last but not least, when asked about death and the ‘afterlife,’ astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson gives a spot on answer that is particularly enlightening.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome all my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Jan. 26 – Feb. 2, 2015

This past week across North American has been active, not only in weather, but in robust discussions of how the “blizzard of 2015” should have been handled. To say that the opinions expressed (particularly the ones critical of the National Weather Service) were as powerful as the blizzard itself is a vast understatement. The chasm between the general public and forecasters isn’t going to narrow anytime soon. As we’ll see in a few links below, the rift between a certain demographic (unfamiliar with the methodology of science) and scientists (including citizen scientists) is as strong as ever. Taking into consideration the current political divisiveness which includes not at little anti-science hyperbole, we haven’t heard the end of this yet.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Here’s a very thought-provoking article with a scientist who’s near the top of my “most admired” list…the inimitable E.O. Wilson.

Here are three articles on the division between the general public and science.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

I was thrilled to take part in the first #CitSciChat, sponsored by SciStarter on Twitter. Caren Cooper has a very nice recap. Be sure to join us again on February 25th!

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Thank you Verizon! Customers can now opt out of ID tracking. For those of us who are privacy conscious, this is good news.

Smart Keyboard Gets A Charge Out Of You.” I’d gladly give one of these a spin!

A spot-on essay. “Don’t Be On Social Just To Be On Social.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

The connection between population, environmental science, and climate is laying the groundwork for challenges that have no easy solutions.

Why do zebras have stripes? Believe it or not, temperature plays a part.

Oklahoma, you are slowly but surely getting on the right track! The Sooner state now ranks fourth nationally in wind power.

Some good news on the solar front. Thousands of U.S. schools are running on solar.

I’d love to see this spread far and wide. “Spain reveals plans for first ever public street light system powered by wind and sun.”

It would behoove us, for the benefit of future generations, to mind the problematic challenge of “drowning in plastic.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

How do snowflakes form? Is it true that no two snowflakes are alike? Here’s a good essay with answers.

Speaking of snow, many folks considered the January, 2015 blizzard to be a underachiever.” To the contrary, it was anything but that. Still, the fallout was strong and widespread.

Are you interested in becoming a Skywarn spotter but can’t attend a National Weather Service spotter training session? The National Weather Service in Norman, OK will have three free online webinars during February and March. Though the focus may be geared towards parts of Oklahoma and Texas, there will be valuable information that is absolutely essential to know before taking on the responsibility of community service.

The preliminary agenda for this year’s ChaserCon is now online…and it’s a great lineup!

While ozone is beneficial in the upper atmosphere, at ground level it can cause serious health problems. Oddly enough, thunderstorms aren’t helping.

Nice video, but “microburst” is the correct meteorological term and they’re not that rare.

I can’t wait to see the data from NASA’s new SMAP observatory which will measure soil moisture just beneath ground level.

A very cool read from Climate Central. “Climate Calculator Lets You Create A New World.”

Climactic rivalry? “The U.S. Is A Country Divided By Seasons And Warming.”

The urban heat island effect is nothing new to this urbanite as heat waves are becoming more prominent in urban areas.

A geological connection to climate change. Iceland is rising as its glaciers melt.

The latest U.S. Drought Monitor map has changed very, very little from last week as the relentless drought continues for many areas…CA, NV, OK, & TX in particular.

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

As a veteran target for the “Serengeti Strategy,” I can attest to the validity of this essay…which I’m passing along for the benefit of others who are victims. Bullying and intimidation isn’t segregated to the schoolyard. It’s alive and well in the “adult” world.

Egads…and just when I thought the “chemtrail” conspiratists took the cake, I (misguidedly) came across this.

Ending on a more positive note…I’d like to pass along a quick reminder that Tornado Quest is not only on WordPress, but also on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, and Facebook. You can easily find links to all of these social media sites on the Tornado Quest About Me page! Also, I’d like to send a sincere “thank you” to all my followers. Each and every one of you are appreciated and never taken for granted. Social media, from my perspective, has never been about numbers, shilling, or a popularity contest. It truly is a perfect example of quality over quantity.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

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