Tag Archives: SciStarter

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 8 – 16, 2017

Greeting’s to everyone! If you’re celebrating the holiday weekend, I hope it’s a good one. For those not celebrating, I hope your spring/autumn is going as well as possible. Here in the USA, the severe weather season is in full swing this week with several days of challenging forecasts. Also, don’t forget the March For Science is coming up on 22 April 2017! This week’s post will be a bit on the brief side due to a developing severe weather setup…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A disconcerting privacy read. In the process of trying to guard privacy rights, some people are trying to “trash their tracks.” Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. Polluting your web history won’t keep you from having your rights violated by nefarious opportunists.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a good read on spring-time citizen science projects from SciStarter! Why sit on the sidelines when you can take part? Citizen scientists add valuable data to research projects that, in most situations, would be difficult to obtain.

Citizen science and weather go hand-in-hand exceptionally well! Here are four ways you can enjoy citizen science get involved and contribute valuable weather and climate data to data bases and research!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It seems as if wind energy gets less expensive month by month…and that’s some very good news!

The drought in California may by “officially” over, but it’s best to not think it won’t happen again.

Speaking of California, here’s some very good renewables news. On one day in March, 2017, California got fifty percent of it’s electricity from solar power.

NASA has a new Night Light Map that shows patterns of human settlement across our humble home.

Challenging times ahead for the EPA. With air quality in the USA still problematic, the health of millions is at stake.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If this past winter seemed short for much of North America, you weren’t imagining things. For the southwestern USA states in particular, spring is coming earlier every year.

This is the kind of record breaking data that doesn’t bring about smiles. We’ve yet another record breaking month for low Arctic sea ice.

Here’s a very informative Science Friday interview with climate scientist Michael Mann on his recent House Committee on Science, Space, & Technology hearing testimony.

Time is running short. “We Must Reach Peak Carbon Emissions By 2020, Says Former UN Climate Chief.

Weather balloons carry instrument packages that supply invaluable data for forecasting and observations. Check out this video of a weather balloon exploding at 100,000 feet!

The Heartland Institute is at it again…this time will a well oiled PR campaign based on unfounded accusations sans evidence.

PUBLIC POLICY

NASA continues to be the target of budget cuts that, in the long run, will mean the demise of valuable data that benefits us all.

Now that former Oklahoma AG Scott Pruitt is running the USA’s EPA, some climate change denialists are bemoaning that, “he won’t fight.”

While on that topic, the train wreck continues. “Scott Pruitt Calls For An ‘Exit’ From The Paris Accord, Sharpening The Trump White House’s Climate Rift.”

Last but definitely not least, don’t forget the March For Science is only days away on 22 April 2017! Currently, there are over 500 satellite marches that will be taking place the world over!

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…glad you’re along for the fun! Interesting times ahead.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! Hope everyone’s having a good week and, if spring has sprung in your locale, I hope you’ve been enjoying the change of seasons. There’s plenty to cover this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Cyber-trolling appears to be an Internet manifestation of everyday sadism.” I couldn’t agree more.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

National Citizen Science Day is coming up soon in the USA! SciStarter has a page where you can find local citizen science events.

Check out this read about Aurorasaurus, a very cool citizen science project that helps NASA researchers understand auroras.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Good things come to those who wait until May, 2018. And I can’t wait to see the kind of awesome data NASA’s InSight mission collects on Mars.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

It’s hard to imagine that this is still a public health & quality of life issue in the 21st century.

The effects of climate change run far, wide, and include detrimental impacts on agriculture.

Interesting read on recent advances on making renewable plastics from plants and carbon dioxide.

Today’s youth are a priceless resource…and much of the future of our planet depends on science educational opportunities, environmental science in particular.

Mass media “cherry picking” is a common occurrence,  especially when it comes to communicating science stories to non-scientists.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There are 122 National Weather Service offices across the USA. They’re all engaged in social media; Facebook, YouTube, and (most importantly) Twitter. In addition to media weather outlets of your choice, it would behoove you to follow them.

The contiguous USA has nothing on Alaskan winters. “By Alaskan Standards, 29 Below Equals A Warm Winter.”

Meanwhile in Finland…”In its latest official reading of local weather patterns, the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI declared that in the future spring will arrive in Finland progressively earlier.”

In spite of the plethora of knowledge about El Niño, forecasting the event and it’s effects can be a daunting challenge.

An excellent Op-Ed by Climate Central’s Heidi Cullen: “The Climate And Weather.”

A fascinating look at climate data from the mid 20th century. Human induced climate change has existed much longer than previously thought.

A thought-provoking read (with plentiful links for more info) on a recent study claiming that climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of flood events.

By some accounts, weather events are this years most under-reported stories.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For July 15 – 22, 2015

If it’s sizzling hot with summer heat where you are, I hope you’ve been able to keep your cool. For much of North America, a ridge of high pressure (often referred to colloquially by storm chasers as the “death ridge”) has dominated much of the mid-summer weather. Temperatures in the mid to upper 90F combined with dew points in the 70’s has created a torrid sauna that only the most staunch fans of summer can love. For those (like yours truly) who prefer a more temperate summer, hang tight. In a matter of week’s the heat will pass swiftly and the seasons will change.

This week’s post, for the sake of dealing with a myriad of time constraints, will be rather brief. In fact, I may experiment with a more concise format for a period of time. Having had several in-depth conversations on the social psychology behind social media with people who, in a professional capacity, are engaged public relations has been very enlightening. In general, most people like you and me prefer to digest as much information in shorter segments rather than long-winded accounts. Having said that, let’s not waste any more time.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

As I explained in this week’s introduction, much evidence shows that brevity is key in social media success…i.e. the ideal Twitter tweet is between 70-100 characters.

A startling look at the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s fourth annual “Who Has Your Back” report on the tech sector’s customer privacy practices. Though this report is from May, 2014, all indications are that little (if anything has) changed.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

SciStarter and NASA are enlisting citizen scientists for a nationwide research project that will examine water availability and soil moisture conditions.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA has released a new photograph of our humble home that is true to its description. Epic!

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The biggest news this week in weather and climate was NOAA’s latest State Of The Climate Report. The bottom line; 2014 was the warmest year on record for planet Earth.

The latest US Drought Monitor showed a great deal of improvement…except, of course, for the drought plagued western states. The newest report will be issued tomorrow and, in spite of recent California rains, will likely show little change.

In spite of a recent rebound, the dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice continues.

Are heat advisories and/or excessive heat warnings “over-the-top hype” or are they beneficial to the public? Personally, I believe it’s the latter, but many strongly disagree.

Last but definitely not least is a “shout out” to “This Week In Science” (TWIS) with Kirsten Sanford, PhD, Justin Jackson, and Blair Bazdarich providing the web’s most entertaining and informative look into a wide spectrum of science topics. If you’ve not seen an episode, you should check it out.

That’s a wrap for this week’s post! I’d like to welcome my new followers…glad you’re along for the fun. Stick around folks, there are some very cool things in the works for Tornado Quest.

Cheers!

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