Tag Archives: social media

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 14 – 21, 2018

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. We’ve had some recent spells of severe weather in the USA, but the rest of May looks unusually quiet. Considering the alternative, I’m not complaining. Speaking of severe weather, here’s a quick reminder to check your NOAA weather radio as we navigate our way through the peak of the North American severe weather season and prepare for the beginning of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Only time will tell if this works. “Twitter Changes Strategy In Battle Against Internet Trolls.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

At least the largest of these will fall in desolate areas. “Large boulders 2 metres across and weighing 10 tonnes could soon begin blasting out from Kilauea, the erupting volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island.”

Kilauea is a major volcanic event. In spite of that, “the largest possible explosive event from Kilauea would still be tiny compared to other volcanoes around the world, from Krakatoa to Mount St. Helens to Vesuvius.”

Property damage isn’t the only victim of Kilauea’s activity. Public health is an ongoing issue that need more media coverage than property damage.

In retrospect, here’s a look at the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. (Article originally published in 2014.)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Here’s an interesting read on combining renewable energy and collecting NOAA environmental data. “Adaptable And Driven By Renewable Energy, Saildrones Voyage Into Remote Waters.”

The challenges on how to handle plastic pollution are not easy to sort out. Here’s one perspective on how solutions could be worse than the current situation.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest US Drought Monitor is out. There’s little to no relief in sight for drought ravaged regions in the Extreme/Exceptional areas from the southwest into Oklahoma and Texas.

Sample of U.S. Drought Monitor

A wider perspective on the current USA drought conditions can be found at the US Drought Portal page.

The dismal snow pack in many western USA states isn’t a good sign for the summer heat and wildfires that often occur in this mountainous region.

There has been some discussion recently on the topic of heat bursts. They’re a common phenomenon, especially in the USA’s great plains. Here’s a good read on a fascinating weather event.

Hurricane Harvey was a powerful hurricane on its own. The record heat in the Gulf of Mexico just added more fuel to the fire. Unfortunately, this also means that tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin could pack more of a powerful punch than people in their path are capable of dealing with.

In a new report released on 17 May 2018, NOAA confirmed that April 2018 was the 400th consecutive month of warmer-than-average global temperatures. “The year-to-date (January-April) global temperature was the fifth warmest such period in the 139-year record.”

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/april-2018-global-significant-events-map.png

Infographic courtesy NOAA

New studies hint at climate change and its ramifications could be far worse than we anticipate.

PUBLIC POLICY

Becoming a politically engaged scientist has become less of an option and more of a requirement in today’s politically volatile climate.

The plot thickens as the train wreck continues. The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been engaged in some unscientific actions as of late…and that’s putting it politely.

An interesting tale of a USA government sea level rise report finally being released after charges of censorship. “Although National Park Service officials say the report was handled properly, the study’s lead author says the administrative review process has morphed from a “rubber stamp” into a tool for the government to suppress inconvenient science. “Censorship is a good word for that,” said Maria Caffrey, the University of Colorado, Boulder, researcher who led the study.” There’s no shortage of censorship and twisting facts when it comes to climate change denialists.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun. Stay safe and keep your eyes on the sky!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For May 7 – 14, 2018

Greetings everyone! In spite of the relatively quiet spring severe weather season in the USA, it’s a good idea to stay on our toes and not let complacency set in. All it takes is one regional outbreak to change the statistics for the year. Here’s an important reminder on the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning. More information can be found in the Weather Safety portion of this week’s post. There’s plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

You’ll find more information in the Weather Safety portion of this post.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This study has some disconcerting findings regarding the spread of false information across social media. If anything, it drives home the point that you should always rely on official National Weather Service and broadcast meteorologists for weather information, severe weather in particular. “During disasters, active Twitter users are likely to spread falsehoods. That’s according to new research that examined false tweets from Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombing. Researchers found that 86 to 91 percent of active Twitter users spread misinformation, and that nearly as many did nothing to correct it.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The USA does have its share of volcanoes. Some like Kilauea are quite active. In spite of its menacing appearance, the red hot lava isn’t how most people die from a volcano. Take a look at how volcanoes kill people.

Here are some spectacular images of Kilauea along with an interesting perspective on what residents of Hawaii see and its contrast with the viewpoints of geoscientists. “Both geoscientists and native Hawaiians agree that Hawaii’s lava is special. But they have different ways of talking about why that is—and different ways of seeing the substance that defines their profession or gives them a home.”

The visual impact of Kilauea can’t be denied when you look at this selection of images that go back to 5 May 2018.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Wildfires alone carry their own potentially deadly threat, but the smoke can have very serious health consequences to some people miles away from the fires.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Can the sounds made by a tornado give a warning to a community? This novel idea in research seems to think so.

Here’s an interesting look at tornado activity and a state-by-state examination of distribution, monthly activity, etc. You’ll find some surprising data here

This is a nice piece with Rick Smith of NWS Norman, OK discussing the daunting challenges of forecasting weather in the world’s bullseye for tornado activity.

With the Atlantic hurricane season only weeks away, take a look at how supercomputers are revolutionizing one of the most daunting tasks a meteorologist can face…forecasting tropical cyclones.

The political bent of climate change and the contention that arises from it is quite absent in many other countries…except for the USA.

This may not be official White House policy, but the head of the USA’s Coast Guard isn’t afraid to discuss climate change. After all, rising sea levels are critical to their operations.

There’s been a lot of hyperbole as of late about air travel being a horrendous demon when it comes to CO2 emissions and it playing a major role in climate change. That makes for good headlines and, perhaps most oddly, some people swearing off air travel. The truth is that the real problem is what people do when they get where they’re going…even if they get there via a banana boat.

The latest State Of The Climate report for April 2018 is out…and one common thread is that is was quite dry in the plains and southwest and unusually cool for much of the contiguous USA.

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/april-2018-us-significant-events-map.png

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, is well underway.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Last but not least…if you missed any safety information during National Hurricane Preparedness Week you can catch up at this link from the National Weather Service.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun. Much more to come so stick around.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 30 – May 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active severe weather week across much of the USA. Oddly enough, Oklahoma went the entire month of April without a single tornado. That came to an end in the first week  of May when multiple rounds of severe weather added several tornadoes to the count. We’re also just weeks away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season (June 1st) and May 6 – 12, 2018 is National Hurricane Preparedness week. Even though the peak of hurricane activity isn’t for several months, now it the time to prepare. Check out the link below in Weather Safety for more comprehensive information from the National Weather Service. As usual, there’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen scientist is easy (no Ph.D required) and gives you an opportunity to contribute valuable data year round. Check out “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data for climate data banks and severe storm and radar research.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re not to enthralled about the recent happenings with Facebook, there are plenty of good alternatives.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been very active lately…and that has volcanologists very nervous.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC HEALTH

Ticks are always a hazard to humans with the ability to spread a myriad of life altering diseases. The USA’s Center For Disease Control (CDC) has expressed concern over the matter, but has been cautious in expressing a connection to climate change in this public health hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A recent dust storm in India killed over 100 people. There were many weather elements involved, including violent thunderstorms with damaging straight line winds.

Part 2 of this essay should be very telling and not a little interesting. “The 1970’s Global Cooling Zombie Myth And The Tricks Some People Used To Keep It Alive: Part 1.”

One of the biggest challenges for our society to comprehend current CO2 levels is because when they were at current levels in the past, humans didn’t exist.

Arctic sea ice is already at record low levels. A recent spike in winter temperatures has happened on consecutive years is making a bad situation even worse.

Climate change means big health issues for those with seasonal allergies. Growing seasons are getting longer and that means a longer pollen season.

Residents of California are getting use to a new weather and climate norm that’s not a little troubling. “Turbulent California faces a future of parched croplands and then flooded townships. Climate scientists call such things whiplash events.”

This past week marked the 19th anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas & Oklahoma tornado outbreak. It was the largest outbreak in the history of Oklahoma, had the 1st billion dollar tornado which was also the 1st time the NWS issued a Tornado Emergency, & had four OK tornadoes in progress simultaneously at the height of the event.

This is the wording used by the Norman, Oklahoma National Weather Service when they issued the first ever Tornado Emergency…the highest level of Tornado Warning that can be issued and is, according to the NWS, “An exceedingly rare tornado warning issued when there is a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage from an imminent or ongoing tornado. This tornado warning is reserved for situations when a reliable source confirms a tornado, or there is clear radar evidence of the existence of a damaging tornado, such as the observation of debris.”

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, has arrived.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Good infographics with severe weather safety information that’s specific to tornadoes.

Once you’re in a structure, there are specific places you need to go for the best protection

Infographics courtesy NOAA & NWS Norman, OK

National Hurricane Preparedness week runs from May 6 – 12, 2018. The National Weather Service has an excellent hurricane preparedness page that covers most everything you need to know. The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) also has a very informative page.

Remember, your mobile device can be your best friend in a weather emergency, whether it’s a tornado or a hurricane.

 

THE QUIXOTIC

This writer visited a Flat Earth Convention (yes, there is such a thing) and learned a great deal about not only the group in question, but insight into certain dimensions of human behavior.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a hearty thanks to my long time followers. It’s nice to have all of you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 23 – 30, 2018

Greetings everyone! If it’s spring in your location, I hope the weather is warming up nicely. For much of North America, the spring warmth got off to a slower than usual start, but that doesn’t mean that a cool summer is on tap. For my friends south of the equator, I hope your autumn is being good to you. Here in the USA, the typical severe weather “season” has been rather quiet, but that could change in a manner of days. At the bottom of this week’s post are several links regarding severe weather safety and a couple of infographics that I hope you’ll find helpful. There’s plenty of other topics to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

With recent concerns over Facebook and privacy, others are looking at social media and websites in general for how they collect information on you. Here’s a good read on how to find out which apps have access to your Google information.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data year round.

Do the changing of the climate seasons seem off kilter to you? If so, you can help document changes in this impressive citizen science project…and anyone can help.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The best image of our galaxy to date has just been published and it’s truly spectacular.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Very small pieces of automobile tires and synthetic fabrics are making their way into our oceans in a microscopic form.

Many companies are pledging to cut plastic pollution. Quite a few are household names with international business. This is good and well, but if it’s only occurring in the UK and a handful of other countries, the benefits will be very, very limited.

Interesting development for the future of the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). “Pruitt Proposes New Rule Defining What Science Can Be Used By EPA.” Understandably so, scientific organizations are very concerned this will exclude valuable data from EPA’s rule-making process.

Here’s some very encouraging renewable energy news. Wind and solar accounted for more than 98 percent of all new USA electrical generation placed into service in the first two months of this year.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past April 24, 2018 was the 25th anniversary of the Tulsa/Catoosa, OK tornado. A pair of strong/violent tornadoes heavily damaged areas in the northeastern parts of the metro. Here’s a look back at the aftermath.

The world’s first trillion dollar natural disaster could happen in California in a wintertime mega-flood that would be the equivalent of eight Hurricane Katrinas. With climate change in the mix, the chances of it happening within a century have increased dramatically.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is far from totally inclusive of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity across North America arrives in May and lasts well into June…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Now for a few infographics. Here’s an important word on those “tornado sirens” that people put far too much importance on…

The bottom line: Sirens are an old school Cold War era technology that often malfunction for a myriad of reasons, can only warn people in very close proximity, and are at the whims of local emergency management. The National Weather Service has NO control over sirens. In the cacophony of a raging supercell thunderstorm that’s parked over your head, you’ll not hear a siren…so it would behoove you to get your potentially life-saving severe weather warning information from a reliable source.

If severe weather is forecast for your area, what do those “risk” categories mean? This infographic should clear up any questions you have. The Storm Prediction Center website is where you will find all of the details specific to your area.

Quite often, if you’re in a risk area (Slight, Enhanced, etc.) a Severe Thunderstorm Watch or Tornado Watch will be issued for your area. There are likely to be warnings as well. This infographic explains the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Lastly, remember to follow your local National Weather Service office and the broadcast meteorologists of your choice for local information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long-time followers. It’s great to have you all along for the fun.

Cheers!

—————————————————————————————-

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For March 26 – April 2, 2018

Greetings everyone! If spring is on the menu for your location, I hope that it’s meeting your expectations and the weather is clement in your area. For much of North America, spring also means the peak of the annual severe weather season. We’ll have a bit of safety info on that. There’s plenty of other topics to look over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Taking into consideration the recent events concerning social media, some are wondering if it can be saved from itself?

If you think that Facebook and Google have a lot of information on you, this article on just how much will make you even more wary about what you share.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news from NASA. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is in final preparations for its April 16 launch to, “find undiscovered worlds around nearby stars, providing targets where future studies will assess their capacity to harbor life.”
Here’s a question that we’ll likely never have the answer to. “Is Humanity Unusual In The Cosmos?”
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
A change in perspective can make an amazing difference. “Satellite Images From Highly Oblique Angles Are Pretty Mindblowing.”
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
For all the good it has done, the Paris Climate Accord has its flaws that need to be examined and debated closely. “The debate lies in exactly how the Paris climate target is defined and measured, which has not been precisely established.”
While not comprehensive or made for the advanced weather aficionado, this basic cloud guide is a good starting point for anyone with a basic interest in weather and wants to know more about how clouds can convey what’s happening in our atmosphere.
Signs of spring are finally showing up in Sweden where some locations, having gone without much sunlight for months, will get above freezing for the first time since last autumn.
The ice sheets in Greenland give us a clear idea of what is happening with climate change. Unfortunately, they’re melting at a rate faster than at any other time in 400 years.
WEATHER SAFETY
With the arrival of the severe weather season in North America, it’s time to prepare for some of the planet’s most volatile weather. Ready.gov has a good springboard for starting a family plan for many types of disasters.
Here’s a simple overview of the Storm Prediction Center’s severe weather risk categories, the extent of storms expected, and the impact that you should prepare for.
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/SPC
Your mobile device can be an invaluable source of severe weather information. Be sure to follow reliable and official sources of information.
Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS
PUBLIC POLICY
The current train wreck at the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency gets worse with every new story. Pruitt and company get more paranoid and histrionic every day.
While focused on Canada, it would not be surprising to see this come to fruition in many other countries. “‘We’re Talking Very Big Bucks’: New Bill Could Put Oil Companies On The Hook For Climate Change Costs.”
Last but not least, the current USA presidential administration intends to eliminate NASA’s climate research programs. “Critics say NASA’s Earth Science Division is a waste of taxpayer dollars and a distraction from the agency’s core mission of space exploration. But NASA has a critical role to play in understanding human-caused climate change, by operating satellites that monitor the earth’s forests, deserts, oceans and atmosphere.”
That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a big “Thank You” to my long time followers…near and far. I’m glad you’re along for the fun.
Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For March 5 – 12, 2018

Greetings everyone! For many of you, winter is holding on with a firm grip. Much of the northeastern USA has taken a beating lately from repeated rounds of snow, wind, and generally very unpleasant weather. For those folks, spring can’t arrive soon enough. As for the rest of us, it’s a mixed bag. A few severe weather episodes have occurred in the southern part of North America…and there will be much more to come. There’s plenty to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE & EDUCATION

Contrary to popular opinion, university scientists are indeed interested in teaching. From personal experience, all of my university professors were keenly devoted to conveying knowledge.

Print books are still hard to beat. In spite of the convenience of mobile devices, holding the printed page in your hands has a special feel to the words and images within the covers. As a voracious reader, print will always be my personal preference.

Interesting perspective that is somewhat unsettling. Many people don’t understand science (bad), yet want their children to take an interest in it (very good).

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Here’s a handy climate-friendly car guide that might help you choose a model that has a smaller carbon footprint than what most of us are driving.

Smart phones have been an amazing addition to technology. But sometimes, we all can go a bit overboard in how we use them. Here’s a thought provoking read on breaking your phone addiction.

As the saying goes, “A lie will circle the globe before the truth has a chance to cross the street.” Fake news, whether from nefarious interlopers or hyperbole/adrenaline junkies, is at an epidemic level…with no end in sight.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science read. “Citizen Science Birding Data Passes Scientific Muster.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

There’s an unavoidable connection between trees and climate change. By some accounts, trees are in trouble. “New evidence shows that the climate is shifting so quickly, it’s putting many of the world’s trees in jeopardy.”

With the temptations of computer games and binge watching television, kids are often inside when they could be exploring some amazing facets of our natural world. Here are five reasons why kids need to spend more time with nature.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you aware of the different types of tornadoes? Not all tornadoes or vortexes are associated with supercell thunderstorms. he most important thing to remember is that each of these carries its own hazards…regardless of how benign it may appear.

Infographic courtesty NOAA/NWS

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA for February 2018. The main takeaway…above normal temperatures and dry to drought conditions for much of the USA. The report also covers the winter of 2017-2018. The maps below show the departure from normal for temperature and precipitation.

Maps courtesy NOAA

Thundersnow is a spectacular event to witness. Here in Oklahoma, robust snowstorms are often laced with lightning. Here’s an excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the science behind thundersnow.

Here’s a very nice video that’s concise and aimed at the layperson who may not understand the technicalities of climate change and it’s connection to extreme weather events. “Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Wetter. Here’s How We Know.”

One sobering reminder of the impact of climate change is the number of billion dollar disasters that are increasing with stunning frequency.

Conveying climate change information to the general public can be an occupational hazard for broadcast meteorologists, In spite of the challenges, many are successfully passing on important information that, for their own good, the public needs to know.

If each spring in the Northern Hemisphere looks a bit warmer with each passing year, it’s not your imagination.

Up to 41 million Americans may live in flood zones…and millions of them may not even know about it.

Here’s an excellent read on the priceless value that weather satellites provide to meteorologists and the challenges that come with the technology.

PUBLIC POLICY

This is one of those scenarios that reveals the true inefficiency of bureaucracy that so infuriates an INTJ personality like me. “The U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board has not met in at least six months, and some of its members say it’s being sidelined to avoid getting in the way of agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s anti-regulatory agenda.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a warm welcome to my new followers in social media…I’m glad you’re along for the fun. For my followers who have been with me through thick and thin, I appreciate every one of you. Your loyalty is not taken for granted.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For January 29 – February 5, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope those of you that are in winter are handling the cold well. For our friends in Australia, they’re dealing with quite the heat wave. I’m hoping this isn’t an omen for the coming summer. There’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Leave it to the Swedes to come up with a great idea like this. Let’s hope that “plogging” catches on in other countries as well.

It’s unfortunate that in the 21st century, air pollution is still a major public health concern. Even more disconcerting that certain members of our society are more vulnerable than others.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Straight from the USA’s Department of Defense is a new Pentagon report that says climate change threatens half of America’s military bases worldwide.

Could global warming be behind this winter’s histrionic behavior? “A very new and “hot topic” in climate change research is the notion that rapid warming and wholesale melting of the Arctic may be playing a role in causing persistent cold spells.”

Blue shading on this map shows how far south some Arctic air spread spread in recent weeks. Map courtesy NASA Earth Observatory.

 

The latest USA Drought Monitor shows a drastic increase in dry/drought conditions spreading from CA to the Southern Plains (OK & TX are particularly hard hit) and extending east to the Gulf Coast states. Here is a region by region summary with specific details for your location.

From Climate Central, a global temperature review of the past year. 2017 was yet another year of climate records with each continent except Antarctica having set warming records.

January 2018 has gotten off to a very warm start for New Zealand with that month being the hottest month ever recorded.

The earth’s oceans can provide somewhat of a ‘buffer’ on carbon emissions, but it comes at a price to their detriment.

Last but not least, today (5 February 2018) is National Weatherperson’s Day. I can’t imagine what our lives would be like without the professional atmospheric scientists who work so diligently around the clock and every day of the year keeping and eye on weather, climate, and compiling valuable information for research, public safety, et al. Dr Marshall Shepherd has written as excellent essay on imagining our lives with out meteorologists. For me, it’s impossible.

THE QUIXOTIC

No, it isn’t alright that this has become the norm, but it’s the unfortunate truth that won’t be changing anytime soon.

People that buy followers on Twitter are a dime a dozen…and from now on, there’s a heavy price to pay for that kind of foolishness.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. Nice to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For October 30 – November 6, 2017

Greetings everyone! There’s plenty of topics to review this week with the biggest story being the latest National Climate Assessment…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Communicating science can be challenging enough but bring trolls into the mix, and you’ve got quite a toxic brew. Fortunately, these nefarious interlopers can be taken down more than a few notches.

Here’s an excellent segment from the 3 November 2017 edition of Science Friday that is a “must-listen” – “Defending Science In A ‘Post-Truth’ Era.”

Convincing the general public that the environment is an important factor in our health, quality of life, economics, et al, is not easy…but some studies are showing hope.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Time for many folks to switch to Standard Time…and while you’re at it, switch to LED light bulbs. I’ve been using them for some time and can’t recommend them highly enough.

Here’s a “head scratcher” read that makes you wonder. “Blocking The Sun”: New Report Documents Efforts To Undermine Rooftop Solar.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4) was released on 3 November 2017. “This report is an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States. It represents the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990.”

This is a nice concise summary of the climate assessment that gives you the most important points.

Nations are urged to step up ambitions to cut emissions as floods, hurricanes, et al. are being linked to climate change.

Here’s a summary from the National Hurricane Center of the very busy 2017 Atlantic hurricane season to date.

The latest NOAA outlook for November shows warmer than usual temperatures for much of the southern contiguous USA and northern Alaska.

Here’s a look at November’s precipitation outlook. Please keep in mind that these are outlooks and not forecasts. Local deviations can and will occur. 

As for drought conditions, much of the USA is in decent shape save for portions of South Dakota and Montana.

COP23 will be taking place in Bonn, Germany on November 6, 2017 for the next round of United Nations climate talks. Here are four signs to watch for that are critical issues.

An Antarctic research station is preparing to close as cracks in the nearby ice shelf are growing. I wouldn’t stay around either.

While ice shelves are developing cracks, global warming is also a significant threat to major cities the world over. Why? Simple. These cities will literally drown.

Could we have a new world record for the lowest recorded barometric (atmospheric) pressure?

Nothing good can come of this. “Understaffed National Weather Service Scales Back Balloon Launches That Collect Vital Forecast Data.”

PUBLIC POLICY

The train wreck continues. “Pruitt Takes Steps To Remove Science From Decisions Affecting The Health Of American Families.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. It’s good to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For September 12 – 20, 2017

Greetings everyone. Running a day late due to recovery from a medical procedure and keeping tabs on two very potent hurricanes…hence the short post for this week. Obviously, the big stories this week are the tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and the central Mexican earthquake which (as of this post) has killed over 200 people. Tropical cyclones Jose and Maria have been front and center in terms of weather. We’re still in the “peak” of the Atlantic hurricane season, so there are potentially several active weeks ahead. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This is an interesting, and disconcerting, read on where a surveyed segment of society gets their news online. Unfortunately, Twitter, which is more up-to-the-minute and accurate, isn’t at the top.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The Cassini spacecraft will soon have its swan song with a spectacular plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Many areas in and around Houston, TX that were flooded by Hurricane Harvey have an extra hazard to the aftermath…toxic chemicals in the flood waters.

Hurricane Irma left behind an environmental and public health hazard that has a level of disgust all its own.

The recent wildfires in the western USA presented another hazard to those in their paths or downwind from the fires…smoke that can cause serious health problems.

Plastic fibers have been found in water samples from around the world. If that sounds bad, just wait until you find out what it can do to your body when you drink it.

Our changing climate is inevitably going to change our diets.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest information on Hurricane Maria and Tropical Storm Jose can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s website.

Here’s the latest State Of The Climate report. “The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for August 2017 was the third highest for the month of August in the NOAA global temperature dataset record, which dates back to 1880.”

Graphic courtesy NOAA

This week’s Drought Monitor shows a sustained drought maintaining its hold from the north central plains to the Pacific northwest.

Graphic courtesy US Drought Monitor

The long-term view of climate change is of the utmost importance. Future generations depend on it.

NOAA’s latest La Niña outlook is out.  “There is an increasing chance (~55-60%) of   during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2017-18.” By some accounts, the southern half of the contiguous USA will be warmer than usual. It’s also important to keep in mind that this is only an outlook and NOT a forecast.

Here’s a spot-on read by Eric Holthaus. “Harvey, Irma, Maria: This Is The Hurricane Season Scientists Expected…And Feared. ”

Why don’t more broadcast meteorologists convey information and/or educational information to their viewers regarding climate change? “Part of the problem is that while TV meteorologists may not be climate-change deniers, too many are climate-change ignorers.” It may not be the broadcast meteorologists that have a say in this…but the corporate media powers-that-be.

The social and psychological effects of tropical cyclones (and other significant weather events) always give a sobering reminder of the power of nature.

An excellent post by meteorologist Dan Satterfield. “You And Your Congressman REALLY Need To Read This.”

Severe weather phobias are very real and, for countless people, a major source of stress and anxiety that takes a significant toll on their quality of life.

THE QUIXOTIC

Maybe it was a slow news day. “Newsweek Gives Cato Institute Climate Denier A Platform.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!


Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 15 – 22, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope the weather is to your liking in your location. The big storms across the United States this week has been the solar eclipse, the first significant one for almost a century. The tropical Atlantic has been somewhat more active as of late. The major concern at this date (22 August 2017) is the remnants of Tropical Storm Harvey which could bring substantial rainfall totals to much of Texas and possibly Louisiana. There are plenty of other topics to touch on, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

The presence of the troll in social media is nothing new. The sad fact is most anyone can (during a momentary lapse of decorum) can become one.

PUBLIC HEALTH

There is a myriad of hazards from weather and climate conditions. Depending on the time of year and location, bugs can be an even greater hazard…many of which spread diseases for which there is no cure.

GENERAL SCIENCE/CRITICAL THINKING

Here’s an essay that’s quite good in reminding us of the fact that science, in its best form, is its harshest critic. It’s all part of how the scientific method works.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

After thousands of years, solar eclipses are still fascinating to scientists…and that’s a very good thing!

If you get the chance to watch another eclipse, please remember to take the necessary safety precautions.

If you missed the 21 August 2017 eclipse, don’t worry. There are several others in the coming years that will pass across North America.

Over the next 50 years, you can travel to a number of locations around the globe to witness an eclipse.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Here’s some good renewables news. “The increasing presence of wind and solar in the United States helped prevent the premature deaths of up to 12,700 people between 2007 and 2015.”

In consideration of the abundance of bad news, here are some amazingly beautiful images of our incredible home that will offer a visual respite.

 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

For months, several Atlantic hurricane season outlooks have stated that 2017 would be an active year. This still could come to fruition. The most important element to remember; regardless of how many storms form, it only takes one tropical cyclone landfall to make for a major disaster.

Here’s a look at tropical cyclone formation outlooks from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center from 23 August to 5 September 2017. An active period is anticipated in portions of both the Pacific and Atlantic.

Graphic courtesy Climate Prediction Center

In California, scientists are taking the reigns of climate research in their own hands. Considering the current hostilities toward climate research, this may be necessary for many other USA states.

It may be August, but for parts of Sweden, it’s time for a touch of snow.

Studying climates of the past (paleoclimatology) is important because it can give us glimpses into the climates of the future.

PUBLIC POLICY

Considering all parties involved, this should come as no surprise to those of us who live in Oklahoma. The Sooner State’s new Attorney General is opposed to the proposed Oklahoma wind farm that could be the largest in the United States.

Nothing good can come from this. “US president Donald Trump’s administration has disbanded a government advisory committee intended to help the country prepare for a changing climate.”

In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence and a global consensus, some of climate change’s most vulnerable victims are the most fervent skeptics of science.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun. Tornado Quest covers a diverse range of topics including environmental issues, climate change, renewable energy sources, and much more. You’ll find much to enjoy, or provoke thought, with our accounts on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

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