Tag Archives: State Of The Climate

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 8 – 15, 2018

Greetings to one and all! This has been an exceptional weather and climate week in every way. Hurricane Michael proved to be a devastating event in terms of damage…the scope of which we are just beginning to grasp the extent of less than a week after it is 10 October 2018 landfall on the Florida panhandle. In meteorological terms, it will rank as one of the top ten most powerful hurricanes to affect the USA. From very modest beginnings as a diffuse low pressure center on 2 October 2018, it grew into a cluster of thunderstorms east of Central America. Hurricane Michael then took advantage of optimal atmospheric conditions and unseasonably warm Gulf of Mexico water temperatures to intensify to a hurricane that was a high-end Category 4 storm. The latest IPCC UN climate report also got a considerable amount of attention and is certainly a subject that needs to be addressed immediately.

Hurricane Michael as a high-end Category 4 storm shortly before landfall on the Florida panhandle on 10 October 2018.

Hurricane Michael’s Eye Viewed From The International Space Station By NASA Goddard Space Flight Center From Greenbelt, MD, USA

A Hurricane Preparedness Primer

For those of you who live in hurricane prone regions, this page will give you a starting point on preparedness. This link will be posted each week until the end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season. If you’ve not prepared for a tropical cyclone, it’s not too late in the season. We’ve several more weeks left for tropical cyclone formation. Major hurricanes have occurred in October and November…and will occur again. Also, here’s a reminder on how to manage the plethora of social media outlets during the tropical cyclone season.

Infographic courtesty National Weather Service, Wakefield, Virginia, USA

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send a welcome to my new followers in social media and thank everyone who follows me! I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Also, a heartfelt ‘thank you’ for my long-time followers. I appreciate all of you. If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or Facebook, you’ll find links to my accounts on those social media outlets below.

Until next time…stay safe and keep and eye on the weather.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For June 11 – 18, 2018

Greetings everyone! El Nino and other climate topics have been given a good deal of discussion lately and we’ve got some links covering those topics. The latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA is out…and I’ll let the data speak for itself. With the ongoing heat wave across much of North America, I’ve included some summer heat safety info along with hurricane preparedness links. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Few things would benefit our students more than a familiarity with the scientific method and critical thinking…regardless of what field they’re studying. “We Should Teach All Students, In Every Discipline, To Think Like Scientists.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This will have an effect on our weather and climate patterns for some time to come. “The June ENSO forecast estimates a 50% chance of El Niño developing during the late summer or early autumn, and an approximately 65% chance of El Niño conditions in the winter, so forecasters have instituted an El Niño Watch.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out and includes a look at significant global climate events for May 2018.

This is unprecedented warmth…and it’s only a small piece of a much larger warming puzzle that’s rapidly falling into place. “The U.S. Just Observed Its Warmest 3-, 4-, And 5-Year Spans On Record.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

Here’s a good listen about a very unique way of “listening” for tornadoes. If this works out, perhaps this will become part of the warning process of the future.

This is a “spot on” essay on why it’s not productive…or worth your time…to debate science that already has sound evidence to establish its facts.

This week, I’m continuing to pass on weather safety information. With the current heat wave across much of North America, summer heat safety is of utmost importance. It’ll get hotter into July and August…so keep this information handy.

WEATHER SAFETY: SUMMER HEAT

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

The Atlantic is quiet for now, but this is the perfect time to prepare for tropical cyclones. Waiting until everyone is in panic mode is the worst way possible to handle a potentially life threatening situation. It’s also important to keep in mind that most deaths from tropical cyclones comes from flooding…not wind.

WEATHER SAFETY: HURRICANES/TROPICAL CYCLONES

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post! I hope all of you are having a great summer…or winter…depending on which hemisphere you live in. A big “Thank You” to all my followers in all my social media outlets. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For November 6 – 13, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I’m glad you stopped by and hope the weather is to your liking whether it’s autumn or spring in your location. As of this post, much of North America is relatively quiet with autumn settling in nicely across most of the continent. Fortunately, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is winding down quickly…and after such a destructive year, that’s very good. Let’s get started on this week’s selection.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

No, this isn’t “new” news. Yes, we’ve been dealing with it since 2016. But is it any wonder that Instagram and Twitter, having become a morass of shills, hucksters, and “beautiful people” have become very clique-oriented and useless to the average user? This paragraph says it all…

“Remixing the feed will make Instagram less useful as a real-time content feed because the most recent posts won’t necessarily be at the top. Users will have to worry about making their posts good enough to be chosen by the algorithm or their posts could be de-prioritized. And brands might lose the reach of a previously reliable marketing channel, the same way they did with Facebook Pages.” – TechCrunch

All hail the mighty algorithm. If, like me, you wish you understand and then disable the algorithm, you may have to research each individual social media entity (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et al.) since there’s no “one size fits all” solution to this challenge.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Your smart phone is the only tool you’ll need to help this awesome citizen science project that tracks mosquitoes.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Studying an active volcano is obviously dangerous. Fortunately, this is where a drone can “step” in and help.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The pollution released by recent wildfires across the USA is making Americans sick and undermining decades of progress in cleaning the air.

Trees are good for the environment in so many different ways…and helping to clean the air we breathe is only one.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a look at October 2017 in the USA. “October’s nationally averaged temperature was 55.7 degrees F, 1.6 degrees above average, which placed it among the warmest third of the historical record.”

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Unfortunately, recent data shows that carbon emissions worldwide are still on the rise.

In spite of the frequent dour news we hear regarding climate change, there are some bright lights that are worth looking at.

Long-term forecasts such as this are a bit risky, but interesting nonetheless. “Sweden’s Big Cities Predicted To Have Coldest Winter In Five Years.”

PUBLIC POLICY

In spite of “official” stances…”US states, cities and businesses signed up to ‘America’s pledge’ to combat global warming have a combined economic power equal to the world’s third-biggest economy.”

No further comment needed on this. “The Senate Just Approved Trump’s Pic For NASA Chief. You Can Probably Guess What He Thinks About Climate Change.”

The “pushback” from climate change denialists is getting more desperate by the day.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. You’ll find links to all our social media below…our Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram are the most active accounts. We’d be glad to have you along for the fun!

Cheers!

 

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For April 16 – 23, 2017

Greetings to one and all…and a belated Happy Earth Day! While every day should be Earth day, this is the one of the few days during the year that global consciousness on the current state and fragile future of our humble home can be brought to the forefront of public consciousness. To be practical, this is the only home our species and the thousands of other species will ever know. It would behoove is to be good stewards and take a keen interest in the welfare of this amazing orb whirling round our sun. Take care of it, and it will take care of you. Abuse it and, well…there are unpleasant ramifications.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

If you thought bad air quality was a moderate health hazard, thing again. It’s much worse.

Many areas of the USA and Canada that are prone to wildfires have residents that are forced into learning how to live with this annual hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA is out. Here’s a look at the climate conditions and events for March, 2017.

Visual aids are fantastic for conveying information. The impact can be substantial. This graphic that puts global warming into an easily comprehensible perspective is particularly startling.

Antarctic ice melt, previously thought to be progressing but rather slowly, is now much worse and widespread than we thought.

Conveying the importance of climate change to the general public is a never-ending and daunting task. “Why Humans Are So Bad At Thinking About Climate Change.”

From the Royal Meteorological Society, “An international coalition of 33 meteorological and climate societies and institutions have released a Collective Global Climate Statement to coincide with Earth Day on 22nd April, which this year is focused on environmental and climate literacy. The Statement was initiated and coordinated by the Royal Meteorological Society.”

In spite of its frequency, lightning it one of the most enigmatic atmospheric phenomenons. Here’s a fascinating look at some of the forms it can take. Sprites, often seen above strong/severe supercell thunderstorms, are my personal favorite.

Atmospheric aerosols are an essential element of our weather and air quality. Sunlight is responsible for chemical reactions in our lower atmosphere…the atmosphere we live in and breathe.

Some Twitter chatter from those steeped in hyperbole has been carelessly using the word “outbreak” as of late in reference to potential severe weather. What exactly is a tornado outbreak? (Paper courtesy Rick Smith, WCM for NWS Norman, OK.)

Speaking of severe weather and tornadoes, here’s a nice retrospective from US Tornadoes of all the tornado warnings issued in the USA since 2008.

For some people, anxiety and/or phobias regarding weather, specifically severe weather, are a real challenge to their everyday quality of life and no laughing matter. Fortunately, there are resources available to help anyone why suffers with this challenge…and when you live in Tornado Alley, it can be especially stressful.

Infographic courtesy National Weather Service: Norman, OK

Heat is one of the most underrated weather related hazards and is often fatal. Around the world, hundreds of millions of people with no access to air conditioning or forced to work out of doors in heat that is getting worse year by year and is potentially lethal.

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

The March For Science brought out scientists and those concerned with science in over 500 cities across six continents. Though the March For Science is a success and brought the current anti-science mindset to the public consciousness, we’ve a long, long hard battle ahead…and the march was just the first step.

The new funding crunch on scientific research has the potential to induce desperate measures that could lead to very dangerous and sloppy science.

As of mid April, 2017, NOAA was still without a new administrator who will oversee climate research, weather forecasting, ocean protection and a $5.6 billion budget.

Support for the worldwide March For Science isn’t unanimous. It’s important to hear both sides and the reasons why some will march, and some, while sympathetic to the cause, will not be taking part.

Scott Pruitt, the current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator says the USA should abandon the Paris Climate Agreement. “Pruitt’s statement puts him at odds with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the former chief executive of ExxonMobil, who said during his confirmation hearing that it was important for the U.S. to “maintain its seat at the table.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Interesting times are ahead and I’m glad you’re along for the wild ride.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For December 12 – 20, 2016

Greetings everyone! For those of you across North America, I hope you’re managing to stay warm during the current cold snap. It certainly adds a bit of ‘zing’ to the holiday season. Speaking of the holidays, this post and the following two will be on the brief side. It’s a crazy, busy time of year for many of us and I’m no exception. Still, there are important topics to keep abreast of, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A wide variety of science fields are covered in this particular retrospective on the twelve key science moments of 2016.

SCIENCE COMMUNICATION

What’s the best way to communicate scientific concepts that are often very complex to the general public? “It turns out that even in the world of scientific writing, your eighth-grade teacher was right: how you write can matter as much as what you write.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Exciting news for astronomy fans. The world’s largest digital survey of the visible Universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

When the air quality in a city is so bad that airline traffic is cancelled, you know it’s air that is literally lethal to breathe.

Here’s an excellent read and infographic on reducing your plastic pollution. The plastics that are part of many life saving items aren’t the problem, it’s the “daily plastics” that aren’t always necessary and so easily discarded that are the challenge.

The Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association has released a “fact” sheet on waste water injection/fracking and it’s relation to the recent and dramatic increase of earthquakes in the Sooner State. For reasons that are blatantly obvious, they’re not taking responsibility for their actions. This is public relations cherry-picking at its best.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An unsettling read from Climate Central: Scientists Are Saving Climate Data; This Is Why It Matters. “In recent days, efforts have sprung up to archive climate data on federal sites. They’ve been spurred by fears that the Trump administration could take a hostile stance toward climate science and that budget cuts could make data less accessible.”

A very unsettling essay by climate scientist Michael E. Mann that is a “must read” for anyone interested in the atmospheric sciences. “I’m A Scientist Who Has Gotten Death Threats. I Fear What May Happen Under Trump.”

Here’s a look at NOAA’s global State Of The Climate report for November, 2016. First, let’s take a look at selected climate anomalies and events.

201611Here’s the global temperature trends for November. While much of North America was quite above normal, parts of Europe and Asia were unseasonably cool.

201612

After a very warm November in North America, 2016 had to get one last cold shot in before year’s end. Watching it take place across surface observations (especially the Oklahoma Mesonet) was quite a sight.

Finally, a rather impertinent view of the never-to-be-settled-argument on school closings and winter weather. In this game, you just can’t win, even when erring on the side of justifiable caution.


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For November 1 – 10, 2016

Greetings to one and all! It’s been a very busy week especially for those of us in the USA. On an international level, the UN Climate Summit is underway and the Paris Climate Accord had officially gone into effect. The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report has been issued and, to no ones surprise, October, 2016 was a warm and dry month for much of the contiguous USA. I’m running a couple of days behind due to some ongoing commitments, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC POLICY

Success, especially in the sciences, doesn’t often come at a “young” age. In fact, many of the greatest have made their mark  with, “a combination of personality, persistence and pure luck, as well as intelligence, that leads to high-impact success — at any age.”

Well said. “Climate change may be humanity’s greatest challenge in this century and far beyond. And the temporal scale on which it will play out is dangerously out of sync with the extremely short time horizon that characterizes our politics.”

This actually can be applied to many scientific fields. “Why Are There So Few Women Mathematicians?”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

If your skies are clear on the night of November 14th, take a look at the “supermoon.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

In the fifth year of a severe drought, some California residents are going back to water-thirsty landscaping as the social stigma against using water is taking a break…for now.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Shake, frack, and roll. This past week, Oklahoma had another earthquake, this one centered near the town of Cushing and registered 5.0 on the Richter Scale.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out. The USA had its third warmest October and second warmest year to date. Here’s a map of significant climate anomalies for the month.

state-of-the-climate-infographic-oct-2016In addition to the temperature increase, the drought conditions are spreading across a vast area from the south central states to New England.

Arctic ice is on the increase, but at a frightfully slow pace.

If you’ve not seen “Before The Flood” yet, it’s available on YouTube…you can watch it here. It’s well worth your time.

Katharine Hayhoe is a climate scientist. And she’s on a mission to persuade skeptics that humans are frying the planet and time is running out to stop it. She has a daunting task ahead of her as do all of us who try our best to objectively inform the public about climate change and the science behind it while keeping the information we share at an easily comprehensible level.

You’re probably already aware that the Paris Climate Accord is officially in effect, but far more strict reductions in emissions are needed for the long run.

During the next two weeks, critical issues will be discussed at the UN Climate Summit. These will have far-reaching implications on whether or not we can curb the ravages of global warming.

An interesting study on the connection between sunshine…and it’s connection to our psychological state of mind.

Superstorm Sandy certainly could happen again. Read how New York City is preparing for the next storm that could rival or exceed Sandy’s level of destruction.

A new study to help the individual realize how each one of us contributes to Arctic ice sea melt.

An excellent resource. “Individuals, businesses, and communities can respond to the challenges of our changing climate. This framework can guide you through the process of planning and implementing resilience-building projects.”

Finally, a nice infographic on dressing for winter weather.

dressing-for-cold-weather

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 5 – 15, 2016

Greetings to everyone! It’s definitely been an interesting week with plenty of climate related news and, unfortunately, deadly flooding ongoing in parts of Louisiana. Some locations have received over 27 inches of rain. I’ve included an infographic on flash flood safety. On the home front, I’ve had a busy August with several projects that have delayed this post by a few days. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

The importance of the history of science to STEM students can’t be understated. “Why Science And Engineering Need To Remind Students Of Forgotten Lessons From History.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Are you using Windows 10? “12 Things You Can Now Do With Windows 10 After The Anniversary Update.”

There’s a dearth of manners in social media. Here’s a very nice read that’s badly needed. “Five Steps To Having Grace On Social Media.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

NASA has just released over 1,000 new images of the surface of Mars and some of them are spectacular!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

A very striking video of changes in Greenland’s glaciers since the 1930’s shows the dramatic effects of climate change.

Though this article focuses somewhat on UK and European cities, it applies to other cities (like Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas, et al.) that are prone to ozone and/or air quality issues in the summer months. “Pollutants React In Sunshine To Form More Pollutants.”

The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency was way off mark in a recent study that claimed that fracking and safe water sources can coexist in close proximity.

Speaking of air quality, southern California has been a hotbed of bad air quality for decades. Unfortunately, they’re currently having the worst smog since 2009.

Several USA cities are leading the way from fossil fuels to 100% renewable power. Let’s hope many more cities are bold enough to be added to this list…soon.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If you’re experiencing flooding or simply need a quick read  on flood safety, here’s a nice infographic from the National Weather Service in Norman, OK. If driving, please remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! (TADD)

Flood Safety Info

Due to climate change, the risk from the Zika virus the mosquitoes that carry it is becoming more than just an obscure annoyance.

In case you missed it, here’s a link to NOAA’s latest and very thorough State Of The Climate report. This is definitely a “must read” for anyone into atmospheric and/or environmental science. (PDF file)

As of July, 2016, the USA is in the midst of its third-hottest year on record according to the latest NOAA data.

Based on NOAA and EPA data, millions of coastal area homes and properties in the USA are at risk of going underwater by the end of the century.

No heat here. This amazing archive of ice cores is literally a look into the climates past of our humble planet.

Here’s an interesting take on what’s apparently a not-so-new rainfall forecasting theory. Scientists using satellite data and statistical techniques have proved that soil and rain are linked in an unexpected way.

As the drought in the western USA continues, another drought is growing at an alarming pace…and almost no one is talking about it.

Time to bring out the cardigans and parkas. Autumn has arrived in parts of Sweden and no, it’s not too early.

In addition to dealing with denialists, climate scientists are also saddled with a segment of the population with climate change apathy…those who think nothing can or should change.

Sorry conspirators. Your “knowledge” of contrails isn’t correct. It’s hard to believe there are people who still buy this rubbish, but then again there are people who believe the earth is flat, ghosts and spirits are real, astrology is a legit science, and the tooth fairy leaves pennies from heaven under your pillow.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun…and learning!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 29 – August 5, 2016

Greetings to everyone! I hope the weather’s being good to you no matter where you live. The most responses this week have come from the article on the current “hurricane drought” in the USA. Complacency could breed a nightmare scenario. There’s plenty of other interesting topics to explore out there, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this weeks links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

A nice essay on how anyone (yes, that includes you) can be a part of citizen science. It’s easy, often costs little to nothing, and covers a myriad of interests.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

This has been a long time coming. The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finally realized that jet aircraft exhaust is not good for our planet.

A sobering graphic that shows the almost unbelievable growth of garbage dumps across the United States in the past century.

Here’s some good renewables news! The world’s largest floating wind farm is set to open in 2021 off the coast of California.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

2015 was without a doubt the warmest year on record for Earth. Here’s a look at the ten most startling facts about yet another record year for climate change.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has just released a 300-page State Of The Climate report documenting the historic warmth of 2015 as well as scores of other aspects of last year’s climate.

The hefty report, State of the Climate in 2015, was produced by more than 450 scientists from 62 countries around the world — more than any previous edition.

What this amazing video of a lightning bold obliterating a telephone pole…then watch it again in slow motion.

Check out these amazing images. “180,000 forgotten photos reveal the future of Greenland’s ice.”

The USA hasn’t seen landfall from a hurricane since 2015. That could induce complacency…and a potentially deadly scenario. It’s only a matter of time before this “hurricane drought” and our luck runs out.

Being an atmospheric scientist and studying climate often involves working in extreme weather conditions. Do you think you’ve got what it takes? Check this out.

Thanks to climate change, a new public health hazard can’t be ignored. “Hot and humid summer weather across the U.S. brings with it the rise of the mosquito season, and this year the threat of the Zika virus makes that more than a minor nuisance.”

The “fingerprints” of climate change can be found on every corner of the globe.

A very thought-provoking essay on a infrequently discussed but irrevocable climate and global economies link.

NBC’s new storm chasing vehicles sporting doppler radars are quite interesting…and more likely a gimmick than of scientific value.

THE QUIXOTIC

Senator Jim Inhofe’s (R-OK) granddaughter gets science and wants to know why, unlike 64 percent of the American population which have climate change concerns, Inhofe does not understand the science.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media, glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Dec. 6 – 14, 2015

There’s been a wide variety of stories this week, but the big news has been the COP21 Paris Agreement Climate Talks. Though the agreement could have more teeth to it, it’s a start…and the quicker we start being proactive regarding climate change, the better. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Check out this very cool science quiz from the inimitable folks at Science Friday!

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Nothing good can come of this. Twitter is seriously looking into sorting tweets by “presumed relevance” rather than chronological order. The shills would have a field day with this.

Why do people get “unfriended” or “unfollowed” in social media? Here’s an interesting take that focuses on Facebook.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out “Season Spotter” which is a citizen science project that helps identify how climate change effects trees and plants.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Fascinating astronomy read about scientists watching a planet being born.

A “ghost from the past” revisits the early days of the Milky Way.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Air you can cut with a knife and can kill you…literally. Beijing recently issued their first-ever “Red Alert” for horrid air pollution.

Due to the spread of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency improvements, a recent study hints at hope in reducing global CO2 emissions.

One of the most troubling mysteries about sea level rise may have just been solved.

A very sobering yet beautiful view of a glacier’s vanishing act.

It should come as no surprise than a recent undercover Greenpeace investigation, “suggests that fossil fuel companies secretly funnel money into prominent scientists’ pockets to manufacture doubt about mainstream climate change science.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a detailed look at the latest NOAA State Of The Climate report.

Capture 1

The COP21 closing comments by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon.

A nice info-graphic on key points of COP21.

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I couldn’t have said this better myself. “The opinion piece published in The Wall Street Journal by Matt Ridley and Benny Peiser (“Your Complete Guide to the Climate Debate” Nov. 27, 2015) is riddled with false statements, cherry-picked evidence and misleading assertions about climate science, according to an evaluation by a dozen scientists.”

On a positive note, there are reasons to smile about the Paris climate talks.

Earlier in the Paris climate talks, many wondered what would a strong climate pact look like?

Once ignored, this is a one way street in which backing up is not an option.

Astronauts (past and present) are sending a very clear message about climate change.

The vicious circle of water scarcity and climate change can no longer be ignored.

Speaking of water scarcity, this is what climate change looks like when viewing mountains with little snow.

An excellent read on a not-so-new science. Climatology (the study of climates) has been around for quite some time. So have concerns over global warming and climate change.

The autumn of 2015 will go into the record books as the warmest autumn yet on record for the contiguous USA.

A very important article on building code improvements based on studies done after the Joplin, MO, USA tornado of 22 May 2011.

Do women and men have differing views on climate change? Absolutely.

The two key points about climate change that “skeptics” (aka deniers) always miss.

Why do many United States citizens remain skeptical of climate change in spite of overwhelming scientific evidence? The answer is more within psychology than climatology.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Nov. 8 – 15, 2015

Fortunately, for the time being, the tropics in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific are quiet. Very soon, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season will come to an end. 2015 will be another year in the books with North American not having a landfall from a major hurricane. It’s understandable that many folks in meteorology and emergency management are concerned about public complacency since 2005 was the last year the USA had a major hurricane make landfall.

In spite of the recent horrific events in Paris, the climate talks will commence without disruption…which is the way it should be. Never, ever give in or give up. And if you have an interest in the future of our planet, please keep tabs on the Paris climate talks as they progress.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC POLICY

If there was ever a time for a “break up” to occur, this is it. Considering the hostility that has arisen in the past few years, it’s time science moved on to greener pastures.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Your tweets (20 million of them) reveal a great deal about your behavior and real-world situations.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Citizen science and your body and health are a good match. Check out these six projects.

SCIENCE EDUCATION

There could be many contenders for this title, but I’d have to agree overall that Darwin’s “Origin Of Species” is a good choice as the most influential academic book.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Intriguing read about one of our solar system neighbors. NASA probe shows how solar burps may have stripped Mars of water.

5,400 MPH winds were discovered blasting around an exoplanet. I wonder what that would be on the EF-Scale?

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A bit of public health and environmental science. The health benefits to spending time in nature are unmistakably good to your health.

A dubious milestone indeed. Our humble home is on track to end 2015 with an average of 1 degree C of warming.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A sobering read on the rising levels of global atmospheric carbon dioxide.

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out with a detailed review of USA significant weather anomalies and events for October, 2015.

Oct 2015 Weather

Here’s a nice map from the Storm Prediction Center of preliminary USA tornado totals for 2015. With severe weather having occurred in the past week and more storms on tap for 16 November, 2015, these numbers will go up.

2015 USA Tornado Count

The states with above normal numbers of documented tornadoes are listed in red. The above average list not only includes traditional “Tornado Alley” states of CO, IL, KS, OK, and TX, but also HI and MA. It’s also interesting to note that many states, such as AR, MS, and TN (located in what’s often referred to as “Dixie Alley”) are having a well below average years. Annual anomalies in tornado occurrence are very common and often the numbers of confirmed tornadoes is or isn’t dependent on population density, topography, and when the tornadoes occurred.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a sincere “welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Instagram & Tumblr.

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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