Tag Archives: sunspot

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For June 21 – June 28, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good week and, regardless of where you live, you’ve had agreeable weather. As for North America, a high pressure ridge has effectively ended the 2016 severe weather season (for the time being) and most if not all severe convective activity is delegated to the central and northern plains as well as south-central Canada. The Brexit certainly has environmental impacts that, for those concerned, should be something that is closely watched. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Heads up for USA Citizen Scientists! Check out NOAA’s Fourth Of July Field Photos Weekend! Perfect way to contribute to citizen science while celebrating our great countries independence!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Deep in the middle of the Milky Way are some very big and bright stars.

Our sun is entering a ‘”phase” where it is void of sunspots…but that doesn’t mean it’s totally quiet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A “heads up” for folks in the western part of the USA. Large-scale movement is being noted in the San Andreas fault.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

“The planet, ultimately, does not need us.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Check out this good read on the importance of sustainability over recycling.

The 2016 North American wildfire season is off to an active start…and climate change is playing a big part.

A very sobering infographic on “E-Waste” aka those old desktop computers, laptops, VCR’s, digital cameras, etc., where they eventually go & the effects they have.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you following your local National Weather Service office? If not, here’s a handy page to help you find any of the 122 offices on Twitter.

Asia, Australia, Europe, et al. are no strangers to tornadoes. A recent tornado in China has resulted in dozens of fatalities.

An interesting look at public opinion and concerns over climate change.

With Britain leaving the EU, how will previous commitments to cut carbon emissions and climate change proposals be met?

The year 1985 was a very cool year and for those who hadn’t been born yet, “if you are 30 years old or younger, there has not been a single month in your entire life that was colder than average.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the adventure!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For Aug. 5 – 12, 2015

Greetings to all. I hope your summer (for my Northern Hemisphere followers) is going well and you’re handling the heat as well as possible. It may be the middle of August, but with the amount of daylight decreasing daily along with lowering “average” high temperatures, there are hints that autumn is just around the corner. In fact, for the N. Hemisphere, the meteorological autumn starts on September 1st. Nothing magical happens at the stroke of midnight on September 1st, it’s simply an easier way to “compartmentalize” the months of the year for statistical climatological purposes. The peak of the Atlantic hurricane season is literally on the doorstep. From this week until late September, the probabilities of Atlantic tropical cyclone formation increase dramatically. For the time being, a combination of dry air over the Atlantic along with wind shear (strong winds increasing in speed and direction with height) are not allowing any storms to organize. This will only be a temporary setup and the current calm scenario can and will change. For those who live in areas vulnerable to Atlantic tropical cyclones, this is an excellent time to make sure your emergency preparedness kits and plans are in place. Are you ready?

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very nice essay on a phenomenon that is one of the biggest irritants of my online experience (aka…adverts & pop-ups). “The Ethics Of Modern Web Ad-Blocking.”

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

How many American’s are vulnerable to earthquakes? The numbers are surprisingly high.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

How about some awesome renewables news. “The US Wind Energy Boom Couldn’t Come At A Better Time.”

This has to be seen to be believed. “Millions Of ‘Shade Balls” Protect LA’s Water During Drought.” Naturally my first question is, “Are these plastic spheres recyclable and/or reusable?”

This article’s focus is on the UK, but it applies to countless large metro areas around the world.

Why is the USA turning to renewable energy? When it comes to even strictly economics, the answer is obvious.

A desert is a desert is a desert, right? Truth be known, there are several kinds of deserts with vastly different ecosystems.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read that puts to the trash bin a common misconception. “Corrected Sunspot History Suggests Climate Change Not Due to Natural Solar Trends.”

You’ve probably seen this before, but there’s no time like the present to add this to your bookmarks. NWS Heat Safety Tips.

NOAA is quite confident that this year will be a relatively quiet hurricane season for the tropical Atlantic. But, the caveat is the fact that it only takes one land-falling hurricane to make it seem otherwise.

I can think of far worse places to live than Minneapolis, but by some accounts, the Twin Cities is rated as least desirable in climate ranking. When climate change is added to the equation, cities all across North America will be vastly different from they are now.

If climate change wasn’t bad enough, four of the worst insect pests known to the human species will thrive…unfortunately.

Central and eastern Europe has been roasting in a recent heat wave that can hold its own to anything seen in the USA’s southern plains.

Check out this amazing new series of maps from NOAA. This is the kind of site you can spend far too much time looking at…even if you’re not a weather geek.

This dashcam video from Taiwan is a perfect example of how ANY vehicle can be swept away by even the most modest tornadoes. IMHO, judging by the speed of water vapor in the vortex, the type of debris lofted, and behavior of buildings and vegetation, I’d rate this tornado no stronger than a robust EF-1 or a very weak EF-2…ergo…NO vehicle is safe in ANY tornado.

A bit of weather and engineering…ever wonder how a skyscraper stays intact during a typhoon/hurricane…or any high wind storm for that matter? Me too.

And that’s a wrap for this post! Here’s a hearty “welcome”Β  to my new followers. I’m glad you’re along for the fun. πŸ™‚

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter.

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Oct. 26 – Nov. 2, 2014

In many areas across North America, the autumn foliage is at or nearing its peak beauty. If you’re lucky enough to enjoy some, savor the experience. It’s been another relatively quiet week across much of the United States. On that note, a great deal of reflection has taken place over the past few days with this week being the second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. We’ve come so far in recovery, yet have many important issues to be addressed…and many of them have an important policy and psychological connection to our weather and climate.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read. “What Time Is It?”

How I wish this silliness would end. Turning back, or forward, our clocks twice a year makes no sense in our contemporary society.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Jupiter gets a giant cyclops eye just in time for Halloween.

The largest sunspot in twenty-five years gave astronomers a view of massive flares.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

This is so very true. “Being environmentally conscious can not only improve the environment and quality of life, but your budget as well.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Oklahoma Mesonet is celebrating their 20th anniversary! Check out their “Top 20 Extreme Weather Events In Mesonet History.” Oklahoma weather is definitely NOT boring!

Important information from the United Nations Environment Program on the latest IPCC report. The synthesis report at the IPCC website will give you further details.

Many challenges are in the road ahead for dealing with climate change…so this is no time to loose heart.

The study of ice cores has fascinated me for years. It’s an excellent way of looking back in time at climates.

By mid 2015, it’ll be time to say, “goodbye” to the TRMM weather satellite. Thanks for the memories. It was fun while it lasted.

The USA disaster policy is good, but needs improvement. Here’s one take on the situation.

In post-disaster scenarios, PTSD, anxiety/panic disorders, depression, et al. are all too often overlooked. Recovery involves more than rebuilding homes, businesses, and infrastructure. These disaster induced scars run deep and can last a lifetime. “I’ll never be psychologically the same.”

ONE LAST VERY IMPORTANT THING…

Attention gentlemen! It’s Movember…time to groom that facial hair into a dashing statement and show your support for men’s mental and physical health.

That’s’ a wrap for this week…have a great week everybody!

Cheers!

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