Tag Archives: sustainability

This Week’s Tornado Quest Science Links & More For October 24 – November 1, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good start to your week. It’s been relatively tranquil across much of North America the past week and the tropical Atlantic and eastern Pacific have been very serene. The season for tropical cyclones is winding down for North America. As we have seen with Hurricane Matthew, it only takes one to result in a tremendous amount of damage and hundreds of fatalities across several countries. As usual, there’s a plethora of topics to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION/CAREERS

A very thought-provoking read on the state of math education in the USA…which is of particular important to anyone who plans on majoring in the atmospheric sciences.

Life for a new scientists just entering the field is more daunting than ever before.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE/SEISMOLOGY

A very good read on the recent upswing in Oklahoma earthquakes. “How The Oil And Gas Industry Awakened Oklahoma’s Sleeping Fault Lines.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING

Solar energy is really taking off…and this is just the awesome beginning.

A study of 41,000 people has further solidified the irrevocable link between air quality (and a myriad of other environmental factors) and your physical health.

Across the globe, up to 300 million children live in conditions with air pollution up to six times over the limit of what is considered minimally safe air quality.

In urban areas, the growth of city trees has shown time and time again to improve air quality. The same can also be said for having indoor plants.

If we can recycle everything we use, including toothbrushes, cigarette butts, and all kinds of plastics that wind up in our oceans, why don’t we?

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Winter is on it’s way…and it’s not too early to review some winter weather safety tips that are geared toward travelers in automobiles. A winter weather safety kit is a must. If you need it, you’ll be glad you took the time to prepare. If you absolutely have to travel, know what to do to stay safe. Infographic courtesy of the National Weather Service.

winter-storm-safety

In your home, preparing for winter is very easy. These few tips will save you a lot of trouble and possibly your life. Infographic courtesy of the NYC National Weather Service.

cold-weather-tips-for-the-home

Will the polar vortex be a player this winter for the northern states of the USA? At least one source says, “Yes.”

Understanding why the public makes evacuation decisions in a hurricane scenario is as important as the evacuation order itself. “Why We Should Not Demonize Residents Who Refuse To Evacuate During Hurricanes.”

Some natural disaster events can be tied to climate change, but not all of them. Here’s why blaming all natural disasters on climate change is a recipe for disaster.

The Mediterranean region, already experiencing dry conditions, may be in for much worse in the decades to come.

There are several towns around the world that are grabbing climate change by the horns and courageously embracing changes that will be unavoidable to all of us…eventually. One of these towns is Greensburg, KS which was devastated by an EF-5 tornado in 2007 but is now one of the leading green communities in the USA.

Death Valley’s claim to having the world’s highest temperature reading could be put to death itself by renewed analysis.

Here’s a good read for my fellow weather geeks. “Sun-clouds-climate connection takes a beating from CERN.”

Take a look at a new way of evaluating damage to structures from tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes.

Have you ever wondered what those red and blue lines on some weather maps mean? Here’s a nice overview on how to read a basic weather map.

When it dark at 3:00 PM on a winter’s day in the fabulous city of Stockholm, Sweden, creativity (and productivity) soar sky high! Yes, climate and human behavior have strong links.

Finally, if you’ve not seen “Before The Flood” on National Geographic, you’re in for quite a treat. It’s well worth the time to watch it in its entirety. For people who don’t understand the gravity of climate change and what our children, grandchildren, & future generations face, this documentary will put it into perspective.

THE VISCERAL UNDERBELLY

According to a new poll in Texas’ 21st congressional district, 45 percent of respondents said they are less likely to vote for Rep. Lamar Smith because he refused to investigate allegations that ExxonMobil knew about climate change in the ’70s and failed to disclose the threat to the public. To add insult to injury, Smith is (ironically) also the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee chair and is among the 34 percent of Congress members who deny climate change.

That’s a wrap for this post! See you good people next time!

Cheers!


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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For June 21 – June 28, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good week and, regardless of where you live, you’ve had agreeable weather. As for North America, a high pressure ridge has effectively ended the 2016 severe weather season (for the time being) and most if not all severe convective activity is delegated to the central and northern plains as well as south-central Canada. The Brexit certainly has environmental impacts that, for those concerned, should be something that is closely watched. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Heads up for USA Citizen Scientists! Check out NOAA’s Fourth Of July Field Photos Weekend! Perfect way to contribute to citizen science while celebrating our great countries independence!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Deep in the middle of the Milky Way are some very big and bright stars.

Our sun is entering a ‘”phase” where it is void of sunspots…but that doesn’t mean it’s totally quiet.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A “heads up” for folks in the western part of the USA. Large-scale movement is being noted in the San Andreas fault.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

“The planet, ultimately, does not need us.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Check out this good read on the importance of sustainability over recycling.

The 2016 North American wildfire season is off to an active start…and climate change is playing a big part.

A very sobering infographic on “E-Waste” aka those old desktop computers, laptops, VCR’s, digital cameras, etc., where they eventually go & the effects they have.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Are you following your local National Weather Service office? If not, here’s a handy page to help you find any of the 122 offices on Twitter.

Asia, Australia, Europe, et al. are no strangers to tornadoes. A recent tornado in China has resulted in dozens of fatalities.

An interesting look at public opinion and concerns over climate change.

With Britain leaving the EU, how will previous commitments to cut carbon emissions and climate change proposals be met?

The year 1985 was a very cool year and for those who hadn’t been born yet, “if you are 30 years old or younger, there has not been a single month in your entire life that was colder than average.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the adventure!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For May 31 – June 7, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope that all of you are having a great week and, if it’s warm where you live, you’re preparing for the onslaught of summer heat. Here in the USA’s Great Plains, we’ll be flirting with 90F in many locations this week. Summer is fraught with its own hazards and the heat that goes with it is an underrated hazard. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL SCIENCE

An interesting read that challenges traditional opinions. “Our Level Of Wisdom Varies Depending On The Situation.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A fascinating look at the weather on another planet as astronomers explore the complex atmosphere of the planet Jupiter.

Astronomers have known for some time that our universe is expanding. New research shows it’s expanding at a faster rate than previously believed.

All life on Earth and the atoms in our bodies were created in the furnace of now-long-dead stars.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Scientists working in the Gulf of Mexico have found that contaminants (aka ‘Dirty Blizzard’) from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill lingered in the subsurface water for months after oil on the surface had been swept up or dispersed.

Plastic bag bans may like a good idea, but is it truly good for the environment?

Living in a sustainable manner sounds good, but many are not quite sure what “living sustainably” means.

A combination of operational meteorology and renewable energy sources that can benefit in a “win/win” situation.

You go Norway! This Scandinavian country has just become the world’s first country to commit to zero deforestation.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

A stark reminder on the dangers of lightning…which is a clear and present danger even in the most “benign” of thunderstorms. If you can hear thunder, even just a distant rumble, you’re in danger of being struck.

These houses, by design and construction, handle hurricanes better than traditional design homes.

A thorough read on what’s causing the recent deadly floods in France and Germany. Unfortunately, it’s something they may have to get used to.

A good read from Climate Central on how the recent increase in Alaska wildfires is worsening global warming.

An interesting look at the trials and tribulations of riding along on a Great Plains storm chasing tour. Welcome to Oklahoma!

Yes, temperatures in the mid 80’s Fahrenheit are quite warm in Sweden. Here in Oklahoma, we should be so lucky.

I had to do a double take when I read this story’s title whilst thinking, “Surely you jest!” “Arabic Weather Term ‘Haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers here on WordPress & my other social media outlets. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links For May 9 – 16, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope all of you have had a good start to your week. There have been multiple rounds of severe weather across North America in the past few days, unfortunately it also includes fatalities which occurred during tornadoes in Oklahoma. Due to reviews of recent severe weather events and the pending severe weather today across the Southern Plains, this post will be another brief one. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL SCIENCE

An interesting read on those “Eureka” moments that many of us have every so often.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Check out these amazing images from the Hubble telescope of the planet Mars.

Just as no two snowflakes are alike, no two spiral galaxies are alike.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very important question for current and future generations. Can cities be sustainable?

In many of the world’s most polluted cities, driving bans or restrictions are becoming commonplace.

Since the Paris climate agreement, cities and companies have pledged to fight climate change. What’s next?

On the positive side, more cities are becoming greener with renewable energy sources soaring through the roof.

Details on the commitments of the U.S. and the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) on further climate action after the Paris Agreement.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Take a look at a very compelling climate change visualization that speaks volumes.

When studying the atmosphere, there’s more to it than the adrenaline rush of severe thunderstorms. Here’s an excellent read on the important study of the link between the Earth’s atmosphere and biodiversity.

A fascinating read on pinpointing the timing of when oxygen first appeared in the earth’s atmosphere.

2016 continues to break global temperature records with April being the seventh hot month in a row.

As the Atlantic hurricane season approaches, the National Hurricane Center has released it’s list of names for the 2016 Tropical Cyclone season.  Capture 1

THE QUIXOTIC

Somehow I strongly suspect that if the genders were switched, this wouldn’t have been an issue. “Reporter forced to cover up on live TV because her dress was too revealing.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 14 – 21, 2016

Greetings everyone! Whether you’re in the Northern Hemisphere welcoming spring or the Southern Hemisphere watching the transition to autumn, I hope everyone’s had a good week. A quick reminder that National Weather Service offices across the USA are having Skywarn spotter training courses. Check with your local NWS office for details. In climate news, sea level rise has become a topic of a great deal of discussion as of late. For people living around the world in coastal or low-lying areas, this is a serious concern. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Instagram, in their infinite wisdom, has decided to try what others have failed at or wisely backed out of…arranging posts in order of “relevance.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A major league public health hazard is taking place in Mexico where, “Some 1.1 million vehicles were banned from the metropolis, children & elderly were encouraged to stay indoors, bus & subway services were offered for free amid the first high ozone alert in 14 years.”

An excellent primer on sustainable living in your home.

A very thought-provoking environmental read. “Nature, All Or Nothing.”

Take a look at these spectacular views of some amazing sea landscapes.

A fire and ice challenge for drought plagued California. Preparing for a flood while dealing with a drought.

Could climate change and/or environmental impact warnings on gasoline/petrol pumps actually work? It’s worth a try.

Time to step up to the plate Oklahoma. You should be next in line for this. “Colorado Considers Bill To Make It Easier To Sue Big Oil Over Fracking Earthquakes.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The public’s common mantra of “We didn’t know it was coming.” doesn’t hold up when meteorologists from both the National Weather Service and media have been talking about impending severe weather for up to four days in advance. The fact that said severe weather event occurred in December is irrelevant. When is severe weather season in the USA? From January 1 – December 31. Where does severe weather and/or tornadoes occur? Wherever they’ve occurred in the past…which is in all 50 states.

A very fun read on the twenty funniest and most fitting names in weather, specifically broadcast meteorology.

Why does the sky look bigger in some parts of the world? It’s simply a matter of subjective perspective.

The latest US Drought Monitor for 15 March 2016 shows dry conditions spreading across the central and northern plains while the relentless CA drought continues.

From NOAA: “February Global Temperature Anomaly Sets New Record For The Globe.”

A very nice introduction to a frequently asked question. “Global Warming Basics: What Has Changed?”

Spot on. “There’s good news and there’s bad news: More Americans are concerned about climate change now than at any time in the past eight years. But that’s because the consequences are getting harder to ignore.”

A fascinating read on a new study that looks back on the Earth’s climate, and climate change, up to five million years ago.

An interesting primer on why Nor’ Easters can be more intense than the typical snow-belt snowstorm.

A new series of papers coming from the University of Manchester will be the first extensive study of European tornadoes in ninety-nine years.

This week marks the anniversary of the Tri-State tornado…the deadliest tornado to date in the history of the USA.

Here’s a fun read on rainbows…one of the Earth’s most quixotic atmospheric phenomenon.

 JUST ONE MORE THING…

Get up, and get out. Spending time outdoors in nature is good for your health.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers here on WordPress as well as on Twitter, Instagram, & Tumblr. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links For February 15 – 22, 2016

Greetings all! I hope everyone’s having a great week. The weather across much of North America has been relatively tranquil this week with unseasonably warm temperatures across much of the southern plains. As of today (22 February 2016) a busy severe weather day is on tap for Tuesday and Wednesday (23 & 24 February 2016) from Texas to the east coast states. Speaking of severe weather, all across the United States the National Weather Service offices are holding Skywarn spotting training classes. If you’re interested in severe weather and contributing to your community, I’d strongly recommend you take one of these courses and spend two (if not more) seasons as an “intern” with a seasoned spotter. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Fortunately, the United States citizenry has a satisfactory of support for science.

In spite of the optimism expressed in the previous link, there’s still putrid bounty of anxiety and antagonism towards science within the US of A.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Sweden, you are amazing in every way! “Sweden To Go Carbon Neutral By 2045.”

Some great tips here! “17 Sustainable Ways To Be A Better Person To Yourself And To Others.”

Four billion people are facing a life-threatening water shortage…and no, the USA is not exempt.

Very interesting, and not surprising, infographic on the world’s most polluted cities.

You know the air in parts of China is bad when ventilation “corridors” are being built so people don’t have to breathe the outdoor air.

Of great interest to many here in Oklahoma. “Does Living Near An Oil Or Natural Gas Well Affect Your Drinking Water?”

Another read for folks in Oklahoma who are constantly barraged with shake, frack, and roll. “Sierra Club Sues Over Oil Company Earthquakes.”

Climate change + drought = a continent-wide volatile scenario. “Mother Africa On Fire.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Interesting interactive chart showing temperature trends for over 3,100 cities in 2015.

The UK’s Met Office habit of naming storms is likely little more than misguided hype.

Some nice videos of climate scientists briefly discussing climate change.

A very important read from Climate Central. “What Scalia’s Death Means For Climate Change.” Like it or not, climate change has become as much a foreign & domestic policy issue as much as it is science.

A good read by Chris Mooney on where our Earth’s the most vulnerable regions to big swings in climate.

Two years ago, a large, inexplicable hot patch of water appeared in the Pacific Ocean, and stayed right through the seasons—until now. Referred to as “the Blob,” it’s gone away, taken by El Niño. Will it return?

Speaking of El Niño, it has passed its peak strength but impacts will continue according to the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO)

 My fellow lightning aficionados will enjoy this read. Lightning-produced ozone has been detected…and this could be important to air quality assessment and prediction in the future.

The University of Miami just opened a new research facility that, by creating a “hurricane in a box,” can help us prepare for dangerous and potentially cataclysmic storms.

An amazing view of ice shattering like plates of glass on North American’s Lake Superior.

THE QUIXOTIC

“Hairy Panic,” a fast growing tumbleweed with a name straight out of a third-rate horror flick rolls into an Australian city.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For January 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings everyone! I hope the new year is off to a good start for all of you. So far this year, at least for most of North America, it’s been a relatively tranquil winter. El Nino is still a big player on a larger scale, many of its effects are yet to be seen. There’s plenty of good news on the renewables front with wind power in particular taking a lot of steam out of the fossil fuels.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Of interest to users of the Windows OS. “Windows 8, Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, and 10 (mostly) consigned to the dustbin of history.”

Sometimes going offline is the best way to spend your time. I take regular breaks from the “online” world and highly recommend them!

PHYSICS

This has the potential to be big in the world of physics. “Rumors are rippling through the science world that physicists may have detected gravitational waves, a key element of Einstein’s theory which if confirmed would be one of the biggest discoveries of our time.”

PALEONTOLOGY/EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

Say “Hello” to the Titanosaur, a species that may be the largest dinosaur ever discovered.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A very nice primer on fracking…explained plain and simple.

This was inevitable, and completely justified. “Oklahoma Residents Sue Earthquake Companies Over Earthquake Damage.”

A look at an underrated health hazard. “Shock figures to reveal deadly toll of global air pollution.”

An interesting look at the geology/climate connection. “Growth rings on rocks give up North American climate secrets.”

Ah, the good old days…they weren’t really all that good.

There are only five countries than can be held responsible for up to sixty percent of the plastic pollution in our oceans.

Here’s some awesome renewables news. “Wind power supplied 97% of electricity needs of Scottish households in 2015.”

Even in an oil state like Texas, wind power is making it’s mark and setting records.

If you live in an urban environment and ever needed a reason to plant a tree or two (or a dozen), here’s your excuse.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A long-awaited upgrade will triple the forecasting computing power of the USA’s National Weather Service.

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on Hurricane Alex, a rare January, 2016 tropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean.

Here’s an impressive view of Hurricane Alex from NASA.

Could the ongoing El Nino lead to a below average number of tornadoes across the USA for 2016?

Not so long ago, the ozone hole was the talk of the atmospheric sciences. What happened to it?

There’s a strong correlation between the recent record breaking floods and rains in the UK and climate change.

A list of ten climate related records that you don’t necessarily want to have broken.

JUST FOR FUN

As the saying goes, “When In Rome…” Or, in this case, my beloved Sweden in winter... 🙂

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For October 7 – 14, 2015

Autumn is certainly in the air across many areas of North American with a plethora of beautiful fall foliage to appeal to your aesthetic senses. If you’re seeing the seasonal change in your area, I hope you’re enjoying the scenery. Here in the southern plains of the USA, it’s been unseasonably warm. Summer is not going away without a fight in my neck of the woods. For the first time in many weeks, the tropical Atlantic and eastern Pacific are rather tranquil…and I’ve no complaints about that.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC POLICY/STEM

Most American citizens feel political candidates should have a thorough comprehension of science…hence the immediate uselessness of the “I’m not a scientist” cop-out.

Fascinating read that should offer some encouragement for women to pursue STEM careers. “Margaret Hamilton wasn’t supposed to invent the modern concept of software and land men on the moon. It was 1960, not a time when women were encouraged to seek out high-powered technical work.”

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Check out this slide show with amazing images of Pluto. Who would have thought that it was such an incredible place.

GEOLOGIC SCIENCE

A very nice read on the history of plate tectonic science.

Some spectacular views of lava flowing on Hawaii’s Mount Kilauea.

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) puts Twitter to good use by using the social media outlet as a means to better track earthquakes.

The USGS also has a very nice informative page on earthquake early warnings

In Oklahoma, USGS records show 1,400+ earthquakes to date in 2015 alone. The science behind human-caused earthquakes from is very solid…much to the chagrin of many Oklahoma-based fossil fuel interests.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC), which regulates the state’s oil and gas industry, ordered companies on September 18, 2015 to shut or reduce usage of five saltwater disposal wells around the north-central Oklahoma city of Cushing. In an odd coincidence, in the early morning hours of October 10, 2015, a 4.5 magnitude earthquake occurred near Cushing. To date, over 1,400 earthquakes have occurred in Oklahoma during 2015 alone…and the year’s not over yet.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Here’s an excellent article explaining all you need to know about the current global coral reef bleaching.

Small, but nasty. California has become the latest state to ban/restrict microbeads in skin care products.

Sweden, you rock in every way possible! Stockholm aims to be powered only by sustainable energy sources by 2050.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A thought-provoking read that’s bound to stir a great deal of discussion. An ex-republican meteorologist has called for the end of partisan divide over climate science.

In the light of climate change, a NASA scientist expresses his concerns over our own planet becoming like other dead worlds.

New research projects a doubling of surface melting of Antarctic ice shelves by 2050 and that by 2100 melting may surpass intensities associated with ice shelf collapse.

It’s not often what you say, but how you say (or write) it. Climate scientists, practicing good science protocol, use tentative wording in discussing or writing about climate change. Denialists, seeing the world in a strict “black-or-white” manner, are quite the opposite.

A sound idea since the science is solid, though I feel it’s most beneficial to implement solutions and continue research simultaneously. “New IPCC chief: Let’s focus on climate change solutions rather than more research.

The recent AP Stylebook recommendation in its climate change section is considered a “big” win for skeptics, a “small” win for denialists, but a bad decision overall.

Finally, feast your eyes on a summer’s worth of monsoons in this wonderful video.

THE QUIXOTIC

When a journalist arrived at the Oklahoma City headquarters of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) hoping for an interview, the congenial IOGCC folks called the Oklahoma City Police. I guess they don’t like their secrecy to come under scrutiny.

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That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to take a moment and send a “welcome” to my new followers on social media. Glad you’re along for the fun! 😎

Cheers!

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Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

Tornado Quest on Tumblr (Obligatory Caveat: Not a science-based blog and occasionally NSFW. You’ve been warned.)

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Sept. 2 – 9, 2015

For much of the contiguous USA plains states, summer heat has been holding on with a vengeance. Fortunately, there are changes underway as we speak and before long, autumn will “show its colors” (no pun intended). It’s also common for an uptick in severe weather to occur across Tornado Alley during the fall months. In the tropical cyclone realm, the Pacific has been very busy this year. The Atlantic has been relatively well-behaved in spite of some noble attempts at hurricane formation. Considering the alternative, I don’t really think anyone in hurricane prone regions is complaining. The downside is the fact that it’s been a decade since a significant hurricane made landfall in the USA. Complacency can breed carelessness. Therefore, this is a good time for us to remind ourselves that September is National Preparedness Month. The theme for 2015 is “Don’t Wait, Communicate” and the time to prepare for natural disasters of all kinds is now…when things are quiet…and you have the time and presence of mind to make calm, rational decisions. Those who have prepared ahead of time and experienced a disaster have told me many times that the time, effort, and resources used to “prep” were well worth it and, in some cases, life saving “preventative medicine.” It doesn’t matter where you live, even if the annual weather events are rather uneventful. Everyone is vulnerable.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION/STEM

If you have a daughter interested in a science career, have her check out the Women In STEM career videos from GotScience.org.

Check out this nice infographic on how essential earth and space science is to all of us. It involves saving lives…every day.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Many people have serious privacy concerns over Windows 10. To add insult to injury, concerns are now raised over Windows 7 and 8.

If you’re concerned about online security, check out the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Surveillance Self-Defense information. I can’t recommend this highly enough.

A very interesting and telling read from the Pew Research Center. “Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015.”

I very, very rarely recommend apps (especially weather apps) since the quality and accuracy of data is so unpredictable. But, in addition to the apps that you feel serve you best, I’d add the American Red Cross app. It’s very customizable and highly informative.

If, like me, you’re a user of many Apple products, here’s a quick overview of the September 9, 2015 Apple product event. For weather folks (including storm chasers), the new and larger iPad Pro would be an excellent addition in the field for radar products and/or model runs…and any improvement on iPhone processor and camera capabilities is a “must have.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project just in time for autumn. Kids, parents, and teachers can learn the “hows and whys” of leaves changing color during fall.

Speaking of plant-based citizen science for kids, here’s an excellent resource from Project BudBurst for K-4 educators.

Caren Cooper has written and excellent essay on the importance of the role citizen science plays in our children’s science education.

This is a project that should be taking place across North America. “European Citizens Measure Air Pollution With Their Smartphones.”

GEOLOGIC SCIENCE

What is Geologic time? A very, very, very long time.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

The recent wildfires in the northwest USA have done more than burn vegetation, they’ve endangered wildlife.

Yes, school recycling competitions are for real…and I’d like to see more of these everywhere.

Just follow the money. “Back to School: “Frackademia” Alive and Well at U.S. Universities, Says New Report.”

An interesting read on the irrevocable climate-biosphere link and how crucial food chain bacteria is altered by climate change.

A UK study that would without a doubt be valid worldwide. Trees in urban areas are valuable in dispersing air pollution (and improve the quality of the air you and I breathe).

Awesome is an understatement! “The Netherlands plans to have a 100% wind-powered railway system by 2018.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past week was the 115th anniversary of the deadliest weather disaster in the history of the USA: the 1900 Galveston, TX hurricane. There’s no exact death toll, but varying estimates range from a very, very conservative 6,000 to as high as 10,000. If you’ve not read “Issac’s Storm,” you should. It’s an excellent account of events and even an enlightening glimpse into the history of the science of early forecasting.

A very nice side-by-side comparison of 1997 and 2015 El Ninos from Climate Central.

While on the topic of El Nino, here’s a great resource for kids, parents, and teachers that has everything you ever wanted to know about this climate phenomenon and more.

According to new research, droughts and heat waves are happening simultaneously with much greater frequency than in the past.

An interesting read on how climate change would mean the death of one world and the birth of another.

If you live in the western contiguous 48 USA and thought August was hot, you were right. It was well above average in temperatures.

Many of us, including your’s truly, have watched The Weather Channel since it first aired in 1982. There are some big changes on tap and, personally speaking, I think they’re beneficial in the long-term.

“Cherry-picking” research is common among climate change denialists. In spite of the overwhelming worldwide consensus, research of dubious integrity continues.

QUIXOTIC HUMOR

If there was ever a country that has a fascinating cornucopia of dialects, it’s the USA. “Welcome To The United Slang Of America.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “welcome” to my new followers. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For August 26 – September 2, 2015

For all my followers in the Northern Hemisphere, I’d like to extend a “Happy Meteorological Autumn” to you. Nothing magically happens on September 1, December 1, etc…it’s simply an easy way to categorize climatological seasons. For many of us in North America, we won’t notice many changes for several more weeks. In fact, the most noticeable change for those of us in the Great Plains are the days with decreasing hours of daylight. That will continue until the Winter Solstice in late December when, once again, the days will slowly get longer in spite of many long winter days ahead. As for the tropical cyclone activity, the Atlantic has behaved quite well. Erika was forecast by many computer models to reach hurricane intensity and threaten Florida and possibly the eastern seaboard. Fortunately, that didn’t come to fruition. On the flip side, Fred ramped up quickly west of the African coast which prompted an unheard of Hurricane Warning for the Cape Verde Islands. The Pacific has been another story. Just this past week for the first time since records have been kept, three major category hurricanes were in progress at the same time and all three visible on the same satellite image. Quite the jaw-dropping sight!

 

vis sat hurricane

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

A disconcerting read on how an increasing number of wireless users are being tracked by “zombie cookies.”

Google Chrome users have a reason to celebrate. Auto-play Flash ads are now blocked in Chrome.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Fall into Phenology with this very cool citizen science project from Project BudBurst. With autumn just around the corner, now’s the time to get involved!

Here’s an intriguing European citizen science project where smart phone users can collect data on air pollution.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

From the North American Great Plains to the Pacific Northwest, large wildfires are becoming increasingly common and more destructive.

Speaking of wildfires, in 2015 alone, more than 8 million acres across the USA have been consumed. That’s an area larger than the state of Maryland.

Wildfires in close proximity can be lethal, but so can the resulting smoke which can travel hundreds of miles.

I’ve read several disturbing stories about this and, unfortunately, it’s likely to only get worse. “Plastic In 99% Of Seabirds By 2050.”

Iceland, you’ve always rocked in my book…and this takes you up a few notches higher. “Iceland turned an old coal plant into a haven for artists and entrepreneurs.”

Pope Francis has courageously stepped up to the plate once again…this time he’s asking the rich and powerful to do their share on behalf of our humble home.

You don’t have to be rich and powerful to do something good. Here’s a good list of eleven tips for saving water…and money.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on why it’s easier to track a hurricane than predict its intensity.

This is a fascinating, but not surprising, study from NASA on the connection of vegetation and the urban heat island effect.

Upon close examination and after ten years, these satellite images from NOAA of Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath are still startling.

A very interesting retrospective. One hundred sixty years of hurricanes in one infographic.

Finally, September is National Preparedness Month in the USA. The theme for 2015 is “Dont’ Wait, Communicate.” Check out www.ready.gov for details.

I’d like to extend a hearty “Welcome!” to my new followers…glad you’re along for the fun!

That’s a wrap for this post…the 200th post for me on this particular blog since April, 2009. I’m looking forward to the next 200…and much, much more!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@gmail.com

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