Tag Archives: troll

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For September 12 – 19, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking regardless of where you live. Autumn is beginning to make its presence known in parts of North America. As of this post, a very warm spell has settled over much of the southern and central Great Plains of the USA. It’s been a long, hot summer and I’m ready for some cool crisp mornings with a change in fall foliage color. The tropical Atlantic is rather active at this time. Fortunately, none of the systems that are being watched are a current threat to any land masses or populated areas. As usual, there’s plenty to cover, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read where scientists answer twenty questions on the future of humanity.

Speaking of questions, here’s an excellent and very objective read by Lawrence Krauss on twenty questions for this year’s presidential candidates. “The net result? There is something here for everyone, because every view, no matter how inconsistent, is presented somewhere.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very good Psychology Today article from 2014 on the nature of the online troll. Considering recent events, it’s a read worth revisiting.

Do you use WhatsApp? Be prepared to share (unwillingly) a great deal of your private information with Facebook. There’s an opt-out, but personally speaking. I’d recommend you change over to Telegram.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A look at an interesting concept of the possible climate of Mars past…and how it could have led to its present day appearance.

No, Cupid didn’t make the “heart” on Pluto. It was something else far more interesting.

Don’t mess with the Milky Way. “Kamikaze galaxy explodes after diving into the Milky Way.”

From the BBC…from auroras to galaxies… a nice collection of spectacular imagery.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

New scientific ways of monitoring and predicting the affects climate change have on our ecosystems are coming to fruition.

Ghost Forests” are on the increase thanks in no small part to climate change. Unfortunately, this is a trend that will be on the upswing for some time.

Driven by climate change, large masses of trees across the USA are succumbing to diseases, insects, droughts, and wildfires.

Check out this nice “gif” of the USA’s growing use of wind power. Take note that the South has a lot of catching up to do.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Meteorologists with the National Weather Service (NWS) have a tough job with many daunting tasks and challenges. They need all the public and governmental support they can get. Your local National Weather Service office as well as other NWS social media accounts are the definitive source for all-important and potentially life-saving information.

An excellent comic that should put (temporarily) the kibosh on “the climate has always been changing” denier crowd.

Part climate science and part public policy in an interesting read on how climate adaptation can save money and improve the quality of life.

A very good climate read. “Why We Don’t Know If It Will Sunny Next Month But We Know It’ll Be Hot All Year.”

I could talk about this until I’m blue in the face. There is a distinctive difference in weather and climate. Hopefully, this short video will clear up the confusion.

Over a month after the devastating August, 2016 Louisiana floods, environmental and health concerns are growing along with anger among residents in the affected areas.

Flooding of low lying coastal areas in the USA due to sea level rise is no longer a theoretical concept.

And that’s a wrap up for this post! For my new followers in social media, I’d like to extend a warm welcome…I am quite active in other forms of social media and would really enjoy connecting and collaborating with other folks into the sciences.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 19 – 29, 2016

Greetings everybody! I hope everyone’s having a good week and, if you’re dealing with the heat wave covering a good portion of North America, you’re staying cool and comfortable. For much of the USA, drought conditions are spreading and even include many northeastern states. For folks into citizen science, there’s news regarding the mPING app. And, as usual, there’s plenty of climate data to keep up with…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re using an older version of the mPING app, please update so your important weather reports will work with the updated database. If you’re not familiar with mPING, it’s a great way for citizen scientists to report weather events to the National Severe Storms Laboratory to help with their research. The mPING app is free, takes up very little space on your smart phone, and is available for both iOS and Android.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter finally dealt a blow to one if it’s most offensive users. Let’s hope this isn’t a one-time publicity stunt.

Twitter is also regrouping in an effort to attract new users in order to, “help people to understand that Twitter isn’t really a Facebook-like social network where you connect with friends and family (thank goodness for that!) nor a place where you have to show up and tweet every day.” For severe weather information, Twitter is “hands-down” the best social media platform to receive severe weather watch and warning information…so long as you follow official media and National Weather Service accounts.

Trolls are an ever-present irritant in the online world, but there are ways to soundly destroy them…and it’s not that difficult.

An incredible technology and aeronautical achievement has just been completed. A solar-powered aircraft had circled the globe!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read on why we need to remember the Apollo moon landings.

The red spot storm on Jupiter has been observed for hundreds of years. The air in its thunderstorms boil at temperatures of of at least 2400°F (1300°C).

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that the DSCOVR satellite has been orbiting the Earth for over a year, its EPIC camera has finally captured enough images for a year-long time-lapse video of our home.

Thanks to climate change, wildfires in the USA have burned over 2.6 million acres so far this year…and there’s more to come.

California isn’t the only state in the US that is currently ravaged by drought. The northeastern states are in the grips of dry conditions as well.

A novel idea that’s worth looking into. If you’ve got an overabundance of CO2, get more giant trees.

For those who have the daunting task for forecasting flood events, climate change just changed the rules they must play by.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

We all need weather forecasts available on our mobile devices. The National Weather Service has you covered for your summer vacation…and year round.

Weather Ready Graphic

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Do You (Or Your Meteorologist) Understand What 40% Chance Of Rain Means?”

For the next three months (August, September, and October, 2016), NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center’s outlook is for above average temperatures for the contiguous forty-eight states and Alaska.

We’re only in late July and, according to data from NOAA and NASA, 2016 is already shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures.

With 2016 shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures, here’s an important look at many USA cities which are bound to set records of their own.

A new NASA-led study finds that almost one-fifth of the global warming that has occurred in the past 150 years has been missed by historical records due to quirks in how global temperatures were recorded.

A very informative read on how climate models are accurately predicting ocean and global warming.

Part health, part weather…a good read on keeping the human body cool during a heat wave. Your life could depend on it.

While on the topic of heat and the human body, here’s a comprehensive list of seven misconceptions about heat and humidity. Chances are you believe in some of them.

An interesting map of the climate worries that are (most likely) in the USA’s public mind…state-by-state.

An interesting read on one of the more enigmatic lightning related phenomenons in meteorology: ball lightning.

Yet another media-hype unscientific term has infiltrated itself into mass media and the colloquial dictionary. Welcome to the “heat dome.”

Finally, a look at the best arguments that climate change denialists can devise. From the article, “These are the publishing climate scientists who argue that something other than humans is responsible for the majority of global warming, although their explanations are often contradictory and don’t withstand scientific scrutiny.” The flat-earth society is still alive and well.

That’s a wrap for this post!

One last note; due to ongoing commitments to many other projects, this blog post will now be published on Friday. I’d also like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! All of Tornado Quest’s social media links can be found below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For April 11 – 18, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope everyone’s having a good start to your week and, if spring is on the menu, the last bits of winter are rapidly fading away. For folks south of the equator, there’s a touch of autumn in the air. Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. This week’s post will be on the brief side due to several severe weather events & previous commitments. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Many of us (including yours truly) are frequently the subject of histrionic rants from trolls. This past week was a perfect example when a certain individual unleashed a toddler’s temper tantrum of vitriol in an ad hominem attack as a response to a tweet I’d posted.

Twitter Troll Tweet 1 14 April 2016

Unfortunately, this particular tweeter didn’t take the issue directly to the publication and the article’s author in question and justified their action by preferring to, “kill the messenger” instead. The incident brings to mind a New Yorker article that is quite and enlightening read: “The Psychology Of Online Comments.” Oddly enough, said individual waited almost 48 hours after posting his tirade…and also deleted the tweet from his timeline. Funny that. 😉 What’s at stake for this individual, or any troll for that matter, is their online reputation…which is often irreparable when one let’s their emotions get the best of them as they hide behind the “anonymous” safety of a monitor.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

What does a space launch look like from space? Awesome!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Of the many environmental public health hazards, inhaling black carbon is perhaps one of the most underrated.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Apparently the folks at NASA have had their fill of anti-science climate change deniers. Haven’t we all. :-/

While on the topic of deniers, they swarmed well-known scientist Bill Nye’s Facebook page…and NASA showed up in short order to take them down a notch or two.

2016 could be well on its way to setting records world-wide for yet another hotter than normal year.

Before many small island nations are submerged by rising sea levels, they’ll dry out first.

A rather “spot-on” essay on five things only meteorologists really know.

This has been a long-time coming. “New Campaign Enlists Women In Boardrooms To Take Up Climate Issue.”

AccuWeather has decided to extend its highly controversial long-term 45 day forecasts to a whopping 90 days.

The folks at the National Weather Service in Amarillo, Texas, USA have put together a very nice info-graphic on the difference between a severe weather watch and warning.

Watch and Warning Info Graphic

ON THE (NOT SO) LIGHTER SIDE…

Asking random Swedes for their take on American climate change denial provides no surprising answers…unfortunately. :-/

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! Hope everyone’s having a good week and, if spring has sprung in your locale, I hope you’ve been enjoying the change of seasons. There’s plenty to cover this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Cyber-trolling appears to be an Internet manifestation of everyday sadism.” I couldn’t agree more.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

National Citizen Science Day is coming up soon in the USA! SciStarter has a page where you can find local citizen science events.

Check out this read about Aurorasaurus, a very cool citizen science project that helps NASA researchers understand auroras.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Good things come to those who wait until May, 2018. And I can’t wait to see the kind of awesome data NASA’s InSight mission collects on Mars.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

It’s hard to imagine that this is still a public health & quality of life issue in the 21st century.

The effects of climate change run far, wide, and include detrimental impacts on agriculture.

Interesting read on recent advances on making renewable plastics from plants and carbon dioxide.

Today’s youth are a priceless resource…and much of the future of our planet depends on science educational opportunities, environmental science in particular.

Mass media “cherry picking” is a common occurrence,  especially when it comes to communicating science stories to non-scientists.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There are 122 National Weather Service offices across the USA. They’re all engaged in social media; Facebook, YouTube, and (most importantly) Twitter. In addition to media weather outlets of your choice, it would behoove you to follow them.

The contiguous USA has nothing on Alaskan winters. “By Alaskan Standards, 29 Below Equals A Warm Winter.”

Meanwhile in Finland…”In its latest official reading of local weather patterns, the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI declared that in the future spring will arrive in Finland progressively earlier.”

In spite of the plethora of knowledge about El Niño, forecasting the event and it’s effects can be a daunting challenge.

An excellent Op-Ed by Climate Central’s Heidi Cullen: “The Climate And Weather.”

A fascinating look at climate data from the mid 20th century. Human induced climate change has existed much longer than previously thought.

A thought-provoking read (with plentiful links for more info) on a recent study claiming that climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of flood events.

By some accounts, weather events are this years most under-reported stories.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Media Inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Oct. 25 – Nov. 1, 2015

It’s been a relatively quiet week across much of North America the past week. Heavy rains, partially due to the remnants of Hurricane Patricia, caused dramatic and deadly flash flooding in parts of Texas. The only good part of the rains were the fact that it put a dent into an ongoing drought that’s existed for several weeks across parts of the south-central states. For those of us who dealt with the “daylight saving time” change on November 1st, remember to not only check your smoke detector & carbon monoxide detectors, but the batteries in your NOAA weather radio. Just like the other detectors, someday it could save your life.

Due to a “full dance card,” this week’s post will be brief. In fact, due to some very cool projects (many involving Tornado Quest), this week’s post will once again be on the brief side.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

“All aspects of meteorology are based upon a world-wide 24-hour clock called Zulu time (Z), more commonly called Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)” Here’s how to convert UTC/Zulu to your local time. Speaking of which, this nonsense of turning clocks back and forth twice a year is, in the 21st Century, just that…nonsense.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

The history of science, and medicine in particular, has fascinated me for years. Here’s a somewhat grisly look at surgical-related illustrations from the 19th century.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

“Can Civil Comments Kill The Internet Troll?” It’s worth a try…but the last thing one should ever do is give in to nefarious interlopers.

There’s a perfectly good and rational reason the iOS Siri’s voice is female.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

A sobering write-up on the trials and tribulations of adult friendship.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The water woes of the western USA states have taken on an unfortunate, yet inevitable, social taboo dimension.

Floridians are having quite a row over keeping the state frack-free. It would be in their best interest to stay that way.

Air pollution has been placed in the top ten health risks faced by human beings globally. Delhi has the, “dubious accolade of being regularly cited as the most polluted city in the world.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The United States may be in the middle of a “hurricane drought,” but it would behoove folks in hurricane prone regions to not become complacent

Hurricane Patricia was one of the most powerful hurricanes in the eastern Pacific since records have been kept. Compared to other hurricanes of equal intensity, why did Patricia kill so few people?

Did the USA’s Dust Bowl come to an end in the 1940’s? Absolutely not.

Some very nice work by Phil Plait. “If Global Warming Is A Hoax…

THE QUIXOTIC

A gem of cynical climate change denialism from one of Oklahoma’s largest newspapers. “We’re Sure To Hear Plenty About Climate Change In The Weeks Ahead.”

And that’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. Glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest on Twitter

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For June 9 – 16, 2015

Much of the contiguous Great Plains of the USA is in store for more rain this week. While always welcome, it’s been too much of a good thing as of late. A great deal of the rain will come from the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill. Meanwhile in California, the drought scenario has reached a boiling point as residents are forced to face a fact they refuse to accept: they live in largely a dry climate. Recent severe weather activity across North America has shifted to the central and northern plains to the northeast. While not unusual, it seems to have done so earlier this year than the climatological norm. There’s plenty of other good topics out there, so let’s dive in.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If this article won’t make you appreciate your laptop, nothing else will.

Another good move by Twitter increases the power of the people over social media trolls.

Hashtags are a mixed blessing. Used correctly and efficiently, they are effecting in disseminating information. Otherwise, they can be annoying #andmakenosensejustlikethiseone.

Social media, when used correctly by official sources, is an excellent source of information and communication during and after disasters.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent primer on one of astronomy’s most unusual enigmas…the black hole.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Can the recent heavy rains in the USA trigger a busy wildfire season? Yes, they can.

Money talks…and some Californian’s with more than enough think they’re exempt from water restrictions during the current ongoing drought. What they fail to understand is the climate they reside in…and that climate is largely a dry one.

As wind energy becomes more popular, the technology naturally advances to more efficient (and quieter) modes of operation.

Savor these spectacular views from the ISS of our humble home.

A fascinating read on the connection between our planet’s forests and climate.

The USA EPA did a recent study that showed no links between fracking and water contamination. In spite of the comprehensive nature of the 1,000 page report, what was left out was the fact that we know so little about unknown (or ignored) risks.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Is the world off course to prevent two degrees C of warming? Apparently so.

Good read with links to further information. “NASA has released data showing how temperature and rainfall patterns worldwide may change through the year 2100 because of growing concentrations of greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere.”

This tantrum was inevitable. “USA climate change deniers lambast the Pope over his environmental encyclical.”

For those of us who are urbanites, the urban heat effect can make summer nights as miserable as the afternoon heat. Fortunately, there are options that can help.

Finally, part climatology, social science, and public relations…could some of the Pope’s quotes regarding climate change be game-changers in the debate? Time will tell.

If you’re in the states with pending flooding issues, stay safe and remember, Turn Around, Don’t Drown.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For May 26 – June 2, 2015

Many of you who live outside of the southern plains of the contiguous USA may be wondering why all the news coverage of flooding (particularly in Oklahoma and Texas) is taking place. To say that we’ve had more than our share of drought-busting rains is a vast understatement. The good side is we’ve gotten several lakes that have been well below normal for years back to or over their usual level. Many agricultural interests got some badly needed relief. On the sad, and even tragic side, several lives have been lost including a Claremore, OK firefighter who drowned while trying to rescue people who were trapped in a building that was in danger of flooding. Several other Oklahoma first responders had close calls and nearly lost their lives saving people who (to be direct and to-the-point) did stupid and dangerous things…like driving a large four-wheel drive vehicle through water of an unknown depth. Those of us in the know who have seen the after effects of deadly floods (which I have) could talk to a good portion of the public until we’re blue in the face about the dangers of flash floods, but it’s all too often for naught. Everyone thinks their vehicle can handle the water. Everyone thinks their driving skills can overcome the forces of nature. Everyone thinks that drowning fatalities only happen to “other” people. The sad truth is 1. Flash Flooding is the largest weather related killer and outranks yearly the number of people killed by tornadoes, hurricanes, heat, cold, lightning, et. al combined and 2. YOU are just as vulnerable to death by drowning regardless of what kind of vehicle you’re driving. If you’re interested in staying alive, read this and take it to heart…and seriously. Now, on to our regular business.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

I’m absolutely gobsmacked that in 2015 this is still an issue. “Bias Against Women In Science Persists, Even In Egalitarian Societies.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

This can’t happen soon enough…and with merciless vengeance. Twitter trolls, your days are numbered. The Department of Justice is about to drop the hammer…on you.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

From personal experience, I’ve no doubt this is true. “Seeing Awe-Inspiring Natural Sights Makes You A Better Person.”

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY/PALEONTOLOGY

Fascinating read on new evidence on the origins of life.

There’s a new branch on the human family tree. Anthropologists say they’ve found a new human ancestor.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A new study finds little known earthquake and tsunami hazards are lurking offshore of Southern California.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Cooperation is imperative to dealing with drought conditions. “Watersheds don’t obey the political boundaries of multi-state, multi-country resources.”

In the midst of an unprecedented California drought, residents of San Diego are ripping up their water-guzzling lawns.

As the world’s population grows, the quest to quench an ever-growing thirsty planet is an increasingly daunting task.

It would be great to see these go worldwide. “World’s first Ocean Cleanup Array will start removing plastic from the seas in 2016.”

Snow may be fun while it’s fresh…but the melting piles that are still melting are vile in every way possible.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Atlantic hurricane season has officially started. Here’s an excellent overview of storm names, the seasonal outlook, and forecast products.

Complacency regarding the hurricane threat can lead to potentially lethal consequences. For many vulnerable regions of the USA, luck will run out…eventually. Regardless of how ambivalent one may be, now is the time to prepare…and the Red Cross has an excellent Hurricane Safety Checklist. (1 page PDF file)

Contrary to popular opinion, tropical storms are not the “drought-busters” that people want to believe they are.

This op-ed is simultaneously ignorant of the National Weather Service warning procedure, the atmospheric fluid dynamics of tornadogenisis, and fawningly sycophantic. Oddly enough, that’s about all it does achieve.

And before I close out this post one more reminder on flash flooding…TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!

Food for thought regarding climate change in the future. “Can A 4C Earth Support 10 Billion People?

An interesting read on research linking a warming Arctic and its potential connections to extremes in weather events.

A very interesting and telling look at eight maps that reveal American’s incoherent opinions of climate change.

THE QUIXOTIC

The plot thickens in the fracking/earthquake connection as academic integrity is threatened in Oklahoma. “Did Oklahoma’s richest man try to get Oklahoma Geological Survey scientists dismissed?”

For some, wind farms are an eyesore and aesthetics always outweigh environmental benefits…ergo, the perfect reason to abolish them from the face of the planet. Right.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links For Jan. 20 – 27, 2014

It’s been an active week in science news from many areas of study. Weather wise, a severe drought continues across parts of the contiguous USA from OK and TX westward to CA. As of this post, many southern states are taking a shellacking from a rare and robust winter storm. While it may look laughable, keep in mind that southern winter storms often have freezing rain (aka a  layer if ice) below just a couple of inches of snow…ergo, the gridlock that’s paralyzing many metro areas. As a veteran of many devastating ice storms in OK, I’ll take 18″ of powdery snow any day over 1/2″ of ice.

Let’s take a look at this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Citizen scientists can not only gather data for scientists, but increase the quality of research.

Here’s a very nice interview with biologist Caren Cooper, “How Rise of Citizen Science Is Democratizing Research.”

Are you a teacher? Ever wonder if citizen science benefits your students? Good news…yes it does!

SOCIAL SCIENCE/EDUCATION

There’s something to be said for “snow days” and this article renews my belief in them.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Considering the tinderbox conditions that are plaguing much of the USA, here are some tips on conserving water.

I’m looking forward to some good info from a new journal from the American Geophysical Union called Earth’s Future.

The EU has taken on an ambitious quest to reduce carbon emissions by 40% by 2030.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The USA’s Grand Canyon is old…but new studies show it may have formed more recently than previously though.

Read how a virtual earthquake generator shows that Los Angeles would experience stronger-than-expected ground motions.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A new NASA satellite will be launched in February, 2014 and do something pretty amazing…measure precipitation from space.

Part climatology, part business: “Industry Awakens To Threat Of Climate Change

Was there a recent hiatus in global warming? Simply put, no.

Arctic sea ice is melting rapidly…freefall style.

If you’ve not seen this wind map, take a look and have fun interacting.

The big Superbowl game is coming soon. UCAR/NCAR takes a look at forecasting the big game: 1967 vs. 2014.

While a rare winter snow storm gives Dixie a southern shellacking, Alaska basked in record January warmth.

FIGHTING FIRE WITH FIRE

Considering the abundance of vitriol spreading from nefarious trolls that’s aimed at the scientific community, here are several items worth reading. Most of the titles speak for themselves.This is as much a sociological and/or psychological look into a certain element of human behavior as it is a documentation of a plethora of anti-science elements in media…both broadcast, print, or social media.  I’m offering for your consideration the following articles under the spirit of, “know thy enemy.”

I’ve been described as being “polite to a fault” by an evangelical Christian minister no less. Are scientists (both professional and citizen) too polite?

An insider’s story of the global attack on climate science.

Targets of climate hate mail rally to support one another.

Why conservatives can’t resist “snow trolling.”

Climate and vaccine deniers are the same: Beyond Persuasion.

As for the trolls…why we can’t ignore Twitter abuse: a guest post by a police officer.

Speaking of trolls, they are often two-faced. Critical of the trolling in person while anonymously engaging in the behavior behind the safety of their monitors. They often lead two lives.

Normally, I try to “tweet with a smile” but this is not often the best policy to adhere to for every single tweet or post…especially in an increasingly hostile social media environment. Your perceptions of the information I pass along are your responsibility regardless of whether you agree with me or not. Having said that, it’s my intention to leave the world a better place for our children and the many generations to follow. We owe it to them.

And on that note, it’s a wrap…

Cheers!

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