Tag Archives: trolls

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For February 25 – March 4, 2017

Greetings everyone and Happy Meteorological Spring to my friends and followers in the Northern Hemisphere. For many, it’s been an exceptionally warm winter and spring is already throttling up. In the USA, Skywarn spotter classes are ongoing as of this post. Check with your local National Weather Service office to see if there’s a class scheduled near you. And, as has been the case for the last few weeks, science and public policy have been front and center…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Wind and solar power are gaining major ground in countries across the globe. Considering that change is often difficult, how will the status quo adapt?

Cities around the globe smarten up & go green as 2/3 of world population will live in urban areas by 2030.

Air pollution isn’t just a minor irritation, it’s a major health hazard with lethal implications. Here’s an excellent read on how to deal with and/or avoid potentially deadly poor air quality.

Before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was formed in the USA, environmental conditions were in a sorry state. It would behoove us to keep that in mind and fight against the threat of retrograding into a new dark age.

While on the topic of air pollution, other countries besides the USA have their share of air quality issues. The problem for USA citizens is their noxious air travels round the globe and eventually reaches us.

Here’s another sobering look at environmental conditions in the USA in the pre-EPA days.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A new earthquake outlook for 2017 highlights Oklahoma and California as the hot-spots for quake activity…so we’ve been warned.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If it seems like spring has come early this year for much of the Northern Hemisphere, you’re not imagining things.

The new GOES-16 weather satellite is sending back amazing high-resolution images!

For the Northern Hemisphere, the first day of meteorological spring occurred on 1 March 2017. Here’s a look back at an unusually warm winter from Climate Central.

2017winterreview_miami_en_title_lg

Sea surface temperatures and weather/climate are inextricably linked. From the National Weather Service in New Orleans, LA, “The Gulf has remained warm this winter, generally 2-7F above avg now. Pic from the NOAA View Global Data Explorer.”

c53aixlwcaadv9o-jpg-large

For the state of California, it was famine to feast in terms of rainfall. Here’s a look at the “atmospheric rivers” that kept the state dry, then inundated it with dangerous flooding conditions.

Speaking of drought, here’s the Climate Prediction Center’s outlook for March, 2017. In spite of recent rains, drought conditions persist or increase across many areas of the plains and southern states.

month_drought

Though the focus of this article is on the recent heat wave in parts of Australia, it applies to other continents as well. “Climate Scientists Say Likelihood Of Extreme Summers Surging Due To Global Warming.”

What do citizens of the USA think about climate change? This interesting read provides some maps and links to answer that question.

screen-shot-2017-03-01-at-1_22_48-pmPercentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication | George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication

An Argentine research base near the northern tip of the Antarctic peninsula has set a heat record at a balmy 63.5° Fahrenheit (17.5 degrees Celsius) according to the World Meteorological Organization.

Severe Weather Safety Link Of The Week: With the severe weather season well underway across the USA, here’s a very comprehensive yet concise overview of severe weather and it’s hazards from the National Weather Service. “Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, And Lightning. Natures Most Violent Storms.” (20 page PDF file)

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

NOAA is about to take a bit hit from the Trump administration, specifically their satellite division. This is ugly…and it will only get worse. Nefariously draconian comes to mind (considering that much of the life-saving data you benefit from comes from the portion of NOAA that’s under the gun), but that would be to politely generous.

Four Ways NOAA Benefits Your Life Today.” This is a “must-read” by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the irreplaceable benefits that NOAA and the National Weather Service provide to USA citizens.

Do scientists really lose credibility when they become political? Absolutely not. We need all the scientists involved in the current political climate as possible.

Fighting fire with fire is the only way to deal with the building hostilities toward the scientific community.

Things are bad indeed. “Responding to attacks on scientific expertise and threats to public funding, the growing protest of American scientists might also suggest something about the perceived direness of the state of the world under Trump: If the scientists are organizing, then things must be really bad.”

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has stopped collecting important climate and environmental data. No data = no science = no progress.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A Norwegian news site is on to an excellent way to deal with trolls and/or people who have a “knee-jerk” reaction to a headline and leave hostile and threatening comments. Make them read and article or essay and answer questions about it before they’re allowed to comment. There’s nothing like a little mature, critical thinking to take the place of sophomoric rants.

This disconcerting privacy read will make you think twice about carrying a mobile device in and out of the USA. In case you’re wondering, your Fourth and Fifth Amendment rights don’t apply.

Your privacy in the safety of your own home is also a hazard. Chances are, you are your own worst security risk.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send out a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. We’re in interesting times…so hang on…lots more fun to come.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest Science Links And More For July 19 – 29, 2016

Greetings everybody! I hope everyone’s having a good week and, if you’re dealing with the heat wave covering a good portion of North America, you’re staying cool and comfortable. For much of the USA, drought conditions are spreading and even include many northeastern states. For folks into citizen science, there’s news regarding the mPING app. And, as usual, there’s plenty of climate data to keep up with…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re using an older version of the mPING app, please update so your important weather reports will work with the updated database. If you’re not familiar with mPING, it’s a great way for citizen scientists to report weather events to the National Severe Storms Laboratory to help with their research. The mPING app is free, takes up very little space on your smart phone, and is available for both iOS and Android.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter finally dealt a blow to one if it’s most offensive users. Let’s hope this isn’t a one-time publicity stunt.

Twitter is also regrouping in an effort to attract new users in order to, “help people to understand that Twitter isn’t really a Facebook-like social network where you connect with friends and family (thank goodness for that!) nor a place where you have to show up and tweet every day.” For severe weather information, Twitter is “hands-down” the best social media platform to receive severe weather watch and warning information…so long as you follow official media and National Weather Service accounts.

Trolls are an ever-present irritant in the online world, but there are ways to soundly destroy them…and it’s not that difficult.

An incredible technology and aeronautical achievement has just been completed. A solar-powered aircraft had circled the globe!

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read on why we need to remember the Apollo moon landings.

The red spot storm on Jupiter has been observed for hundreds of years. The air in its thunderstorms boil at temperatures of of at least 2400°F (1300°C).

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Now that the DSCOVR satellite has been orbiting the Earth for over a year, its EPIC camera has finally captured enough images for a year-long time-lapse video of our home.

Thanks to climate change, wildfires in the USA have burned over 2.6 million acres so far this year…and there’s more to come.

California isn’t the only state in the US that is currently ravaged by drought. The northeastern states are in the grips of dry conditions as well.

A novel idea that’s worth looking into. If you’ve got an overabundance of CO2, get more giant trees.

For those who have the daunting task for forecasting flood events, climate change just changed the rules they must play by.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

We all need weather forecasts available on our mobile devices. The National Weather Service has you covered for your summer vacation…and year round.

Weather Ready Graphic

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Do You (Or Your Meteorologist) Understand What 40% Chance Of Rain Means?”

For the next three months (August, September, and October, 2016), NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center’s outlook is for above average temperatures for the contiguous forty-eight states and Alaska.

We’re only in late July and, according to data from NOAA and NASA, 2016 is already shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures.

With 2016 shaping up to be another record-breaking year for global temperatures, here’s an important look at many USA cities which are bound to set records of their own.

A new NASA-led study finds that almost one-fifth of the global warming that has occurred in the past 150 years has been missed by historical records due to quirks in how global temperatures were recorded.

A very informative read on how climate models are accurately predicting ocean and global warming.

Part health, part weather…a good read on keeping the human body cool during a heat wave. Your life could depend on it.

While on the topic of heat and the human body, here’s a comprehensive list of seven misconceptions about heat and humidity. Chances are you believe in some of them.

An interesting map of the climate worries that are (most likely) in the USA’s public mind…state-by-state.

An interesting read on one of the more enigmatic lightning related phenomenons in meteorology: ball lightning.

Yet another media-hype unscientific term has infiltrated itself into mass media and the colloquial dictionary. Welcome to the “heat dome.”

Finally, a look at the best arguments that climate change denialists can devise. From the article, “These are the publishing climate scientists who argue that something other than humans is responsible for the majority of global warming, although their explanations are often contradictory and don’t withstand scientific scrutiny.” The flat-earth society is still alive and well.

That’s a wrap for this post!

One last note; due to ongoing commitments to many other projects, this blog post will now be published on Friday. I’d also like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! All of Tornado Quest’s social media links can be found below.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For June 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! I do hope all of you are having a good week and, if it’s hot in your location, you’re taking it easy & staying cool. There’s plenty to go over for this week though this post, like most others this time of year, is brief due to the North American severe weather season. As time allows, I may add a few more links during the week…so please check back.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SOCIAL MEDIA

After over 20 years of daily internet use, I’m still taken aback at the venomous vitriol that exists online. Here’s an informative read on why, behind the “anonymous” facade of a monitor, some people are downright mean. Whether its Facebook or FriendLife or numerous other forums, expressions of hatred flourish…and in expressing that hatred, be warned that it tells you everything about that person.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

For astronomy fans, light pollution is the bane of their existence. Across North America, up to 80% of the population is affected. Worldwide, 30% of the world’s population can’t see the Milky Way.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Norway has just adopted the world’s first zero deforestation policy…but what does that exactly mean?

A new study by the U.S. Forest Service projects a dramatic increase in wildfires for the southeastern region of the USA.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A very thought-provoking read that raises many good points. While storm chasers have been their own worst enemy in recent years, attacking them with unwarranted accusations isn’t productive.

Earlier this month, the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that the past year’s El Niño had thrown in the towel and retired for the time being.

Privatizing many of the roles of the National Weather Service would be nothing less than an unmitigated disaster.

Yes, the recent floods in Europe have a connection to climate change.

In the coming decades, farmers will take a big hit from climate change.

Lightning can result in many things both good and bad. One of the good things is it’s the way it can shape life on our planet.

If May, 2016 seemed warmer than usual, you weren’t imagining things. It was yet another warm month for the record books.

That’s a wrap for this post!

I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media and thank countless others who have shown loyalty over the years. I appreciate you all a great deal!

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Science Links And More For April 11 – 18, 2016

Greetings to one and all! I hope everyone’s having a good start to your week and, if spring is on the menu, the last bits of winter are rapidly fading away. For folks south of the equator, there’s a touch of autumn in the air. Regardless of where you live, I hope the weather is to your liking. This week’s post will be on the brief side due to several severe weather events & previous commitments. On that note, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Many of us (including yours truly) are frequently the subject of histrionic rants from trolls. This past week was a perfect example when a certain individual unleashed a toddler’s temper tantrum of vitriol in an ad hominem attack as a response to a tweet I’d posted.

Twitter Troll Tweet 1 14 April 2016

Unfortunately, this particular tweeter didn’t take the issue directly to the publication and the article’s author in question and justified their action by preferring to, “kill the messenger” instead. The incident brings to mind a New Yorker article that is quite and enlightening read: “The Psychology Of Online Comments.” Oddly enough, said individual waited almost 48 hours after posting his tirade…and also deleted the tweet from his timeline. Funny that. 😉 What’s at stake for this individual, or any troll for that matter, is their online reputation…which is often irreparable when one let’s their emotions get the best of them as they hide behind the “anonymous” safety of a monitor.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

What does a space launch look like from space? Awesome!

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Of the many environmental public health hazards, inhaling black carbon is perhaps one of the most underrated.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Apparently the folks at NASA have had their fill of anti-science climate change deniers. Haven’t we all. :-/

While on the topic of deniers, they swarmed well-known scientist Bill Nye’s Facebook page…and NASA showed up in short order to take them down a notch or two.

2016 could be well on its way to setting records world-wide for yet another hotter than normal year.

Before many small island nations are submerged by rising sea levels, they’ll dry out first.

A rather “spot-on” essay on five things only meteorologists really know.

This has been a long-time coming. “New Campaign Enlists Women In Boardrooms To Take Up Climate Issue.”

AccuWeather has decided to extend its highly controversial long-term 45 day forecasts to a whopping 90 days.

The folks at the National Weather Service in Amarillo, Texas, USA have put together a very nice info-graphic on the difference between a severe weather watch and warning.

Watch and Warning Info Graphic

ON THE (NOT SO) LIGHTER SIDE…

Asking random Swedes for their take on American climate change denial provides no surprising answers…unfortunately. :-/

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For March 7 – 14, 2016

Greetings everyone! Hope everyone’s having a good week and, if spring has sprung in your locale, I hope you’ve been enjoying the change of seasons. There’s plenty to cover this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Cyber-trolling appears to be an Internet manifestation of everyday sadism.” I couldn’t agree more.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

National Citizen Science Day is coming up soon in the USA! SciStarter has a page where you can find local citizen science events.

Check out this read about Aurorasaurus, a very cool citizen science project that helps NASA researchers understand auroras.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

Good things come to those who wait until May, 2018. And I can’t wait to see the kind of awesome data NASA’s InSight mission collects on Mars.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

It’s hard to imagine that this is still a public health & quality of life issue in the 21st century.

The effects of climate change run far, wide, and include detrimental impacts on agriculture.

Interesting read on recent advances on making renewable plastics from plants and carbon dioxide.

Today’s youth are a priceless resource…and much of the future of our planet depends on science educational opportunities, environmental science in particular.

Mass media “cherry picking” is a common occurrence,  especially when it comes to communicating science stories to non-scientists.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

There are 122 National Weather Service offices across the USA. They’re all engaged in social media; Facebook, YouTube, and (most importantly) Twitter. In addition to media weather outlets of your choice, it would behoove you to follow them.

The contiguous USA has nothing on Alaskan winters. “By Alaskan Standards, 29 Below Equals A Warm Winter.”

Meanwhile in Finland…”In its latest official reading of local weather patterns, the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI declared that in the future spring will arrive in Finland progressively earlier.”

In spite of the plethora of knowledge about El Niño, forecasting the event and it’s effects can be a daunting challenge.

An excellent Op-Ed by Climate Central’s Heidi Cullen: “The Climate And Weather.”

A fascinating look at climate data from the mid 20th century. Human induced climate change has existed much longer than previously thought.

A thought-provoking read (with plentiful links for more info) on a recent study claiming that climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of flood events.

By some accounts, weather events are this years most under-reported stories.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers on social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

 

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

 

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Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For April 20 – 28, 2015

After several days of active severe weather, the contiguous 48 USA states get a bit of a respite. For the most part, it will be welcome. There’s still plenty of time left to get your emergency kit for home or work in order…and this quiet period is a good time to make sure everything is in check. May is the most active tornado month (from a climatological standpoint) for North America…so we’ve still many weeks of severe weather potential ahead. With the recent spate of severe weather and several crucial deadlines garnering my time and energy, I’ve had to carefully delegate my time…ergo the brevity of this post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s posts…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Food for thought. “Can We Trust Scientists Self-Control?” In general, yes.

An excellent essay that hits the spot in “Inoculating Against Science Denial.”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A “must-read” for anyone who is online from Ghostery (which I can’t recommend highly enough). Trolls…aka online bullies…don’t just live for the change to make sophomoric comments, some lust for private data too.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

A very comprehensive list of about one hundred books that cover a wide spectrum on the history of science.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The recent devastating Nepal earthquake was, by some accounts, a “nightmare waiting to happen.”

This doesn’t surprise me at all. We’re so good at causing earthquakes, the U.S. Geological Survey wants to start forecasting them.

Oklahomans feel far more earthquakes than Californians do…and the reason isn’t a surprise. Shake, frack, and roll.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

This is the kind of good news I love seeing. “Like Shale Oil, Solar Power Is Shaking Up Global Energy.”

This is Air Quality Awareness Week. For many folks (depending on their local climate patterns) with health issues, this is far more important than even severe weather awareness.

2015 could be a very rough year for wildfires across the contiguous USA…and California in particular.

Our dependency on Amazon rainforests is much greater than we are aware of.

Some surprising survey results of American’s opinions on regulating CO2 and renewable energy research.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Nice overview of the current California drought and its connection to climate change.

California’s drought isn’t the end of the world, but it will change the lifestyles of people who are affected by it. Welcome to a new and permanent way of life.

Are recent extremes in weather events tied to climate change? Some studies say, “yes.”

It’s been almost a decade (October, 2005) since a major (Category 3 or stronger) hurricane has made landfall in the USA. How much longer will our luck hold out?

I couldn’t have said it better myself. “Climate change eats away at the foundation of virtually every issue Americans worry most about today: the economy, national security, good jobs and public health.”

Could seasonal tornado forecasts be on the horizon? If this is feasible, it will be interesting to see how well it works over the long term.

There’s quite a storm brewing over the National Weather Service in Birmingham, AL installing a television studio. Personally, I welcome the concept and think it’s a cracking idea!

Can doppler radar detect birds? Absolutely. It can also detect smoke from wildfires, insects, bats…and much more!

Ft Worth TX NWS GraphicA very informative graphic from the National Weather Service in Fort Worth, TX explaining why an impressive velocity couplet on radar doesn’t mean “wedge.” A long-lasting cyclic supercell moved across central TX on 26 April 2015 and produced all modes of severe weather including large hail, tornadoes, and flash flooding. Damage surveys revealed all the tornadoes that occurred were of EF-0 intensity. Evaluation of real-time storm chaser reports also reveal 1) the difficulty in accurately deciphering what chasers are seeing with only lightning to illuminate the storm and 2) the hazards for the general public of getting your warning information from unofficial (non NWS and media outlet) weather information sources.

Ft Worth TX NWS Graphic2Yes, it was a remarkable supercell with impressive fluid dynamics and behavior, but rather normal in the number of and intensity of tornadoes.

FINALLY, THE QUIXOTIC

Can you put a price on the opinion of Pope Francis? Apparently some delusional opportunists think so…which is a shame. Unethical also comes to mind.

And on that note, this is a wrap! See you good folks next time!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much, Much More For March 23 – 30, 2015

To say that the severe weather season for the contiguous USA got started with a “bang” is a vast understatement. Nature pulled a fast one on us. What appeared as a potentially big (literally) hail day with a Moderate and Enhanced Risk for parts of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma turned out to be an event with all modes of severe weather occurring. At the bottom of this post will be sites with up-to-date information relevant to the event. Is this an omen as to what the rest of the severe weather season will bring? Not likely, but then again, nature always has the better hand and the ace up the sleeve. We’ll have to wait and find out. As for preparedness, it’s best to be prepared for emergencies even if one doesn’t occur. There’s plenty of other interesting topics for this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

A very telling read about scientists studying journalists that cover science.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Once again Twitter shows off its third-rate milquetoast attitude towards trolls and bullying.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

The scorch marks left by our rovers are Mars quickly fade as the red planet reclaims traces of our presence.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

As a former HVAC technician, I can vouch for the validity of this infographic on the dangers of indoor air pollution.

A new study shows the extent that humankind has tailored the Earth’s landscapes to our own devices at the expense of the rest of the natural world.

The current California drought isn’t helping the already problematic air quality issues.

Did you take part in Earth Hour on 28 March 2015? I did…and didn’t miss anything I thought I might.

Here’s some awesome renewables news from the Lone Star state! Georgetown, Texas will get all of its power from solar and wind. They should win an award. Now, who’s next?

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s the latest US Drought Monitor. Unfortunately, little to no change from last week. This past week’s rainfall in the southern plains didn’t fall on the parts of Oklahoma and Texas that need it the most.

Interesting new study based in part on NASA satellite data has shows an increase in large, well-organized thunderstorms is behind increased rainfall in the wettest tropical regions.

A very thought-provoking read on the media’s response to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

It’s our responsibility to leave a health planet for our children, grandchildren, and the many generations to follow. “Tackling Climate Change ~ For Our Kids.”

Antarctica may have seen a recent high temperature record. 63.5F may not be blistering hot, but it’s toasty for that continent.

Speaking of Antarctica, it’s ice shelves are not in the best of shape.

THE 25 MARCH 2015 OKLAHOMA AND ARKANSAS SEVERE WEATHER EVENT

First, some handy safety tips from AAA on what to do if you’re driving and find yourself caught in a storm. Ideally, the best thing to do is not wind up in that kind of bind in the first place!

Summary pages of the 25 March 2015 severe weather events from the Tulsa, Norman, Springfield, and Little Rock National Weather Service offices. Much of this information is preliminary and updates will be added often.

Here’s an excellent video by broadcast meteorologist George Flickinger of Tulsa’s KJRH discussing the Sand Springs, OK tornado and how the silly myths (rivers and/or hills protecting a town or city) were blown away by this storm.

Nice radar images from the Tulsa NWS of the Sand Springs, OK tornado.

An impressive gallery of images from the Tulsa World of the Sand Springs, OK tornado damage.

An excellent must-read for anyone who really wants to understand the dynamics of severe weather: “The Science Behind The Oklahoma And Arkansas Tornadoes Of March 25, 2015.”

As time allows, I may add a few more links with further information regarding this event.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d also like to extend a hearty welcome to my new followers…very glad you’re along for the fun!

Tornado Quest Science Links For Feb. 2 – 9, 2015

Across North America, winter is still in full swing. With the exception of the relentless snowstorm that has been pounding much of the northeastern USA (and New England in particular), the cold season has behaved itself rather well. With several more weeks of cold weather still to come, we’ve plenty of time for more snow and or ice. All across the USA, National Weather Service offices are holding Skywarn spotter training sessions. If you’re planning on becoming a spotter, this training is absolutely essential. It’s also not too early for everyone to start planning for the coming uptick in severe weather activity. If you live in an area that is prone to severe thunderstorms and/or tornadoes, winter is an excellent time to prepare for an emergency.

I’d like to express my appreciation for all of the positive feedback I’ve received about my diversification of topics on Tornado Quest. While the focus will still be on the atmospheric sciences, you can expect much more in citizen science, environmental science, and related public policy topics for the future. Once again…thanks for all your positive feedback! 😎

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Who better to put on stage and communicate the process of science than scientists themselves.

Are politicians “Oblivious To Oblivion?”

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

Twitter is finally clamping down on the malevolent guttersnipes that infest so much of social media.

An informative “long-read” on net neutrality that affects everyone who uses the internet. “Don’t call them “utility” rules: The FCC’s net neutrality regime, explained.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Thought this is from a December, 2014 post, we’ve plenty of winter ahead of us in North America to help out in the IceWatch USA project.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

Here’s a great primer on sustainability…and more specifically, what it really is. “Can You Afford Not Being Sustainable?”

The first recycled alkaline batteries have hit the market. I’ll gladly give these a try…and hope they live up to their promise. Of course, rechargeable batteries are always a good option as well.

Sobering read from NRDC. “Fast Food Trash Nation? Time To Cut Down On Packaging Waste.”

A shameful waste, not just environmentally, but financially. “Every year in the United States, the paper, aluminum, glass, plastics and other recyclable material we throw away would be worth $11.4 billion if it were recycled.”

Good news on the renewables front. “Six charts that show renewable energy is getting cheaper.”

Here’s the amazing gadget that can help reduce CO2…and you can help out by planting one…or two.

This was inevitable. Post-Sandy New York City subways are showing signs of harboring unknown microbes.

While on the topic of microbes, high school students are discovering drug-resistant bacteria in subway stations. But consider this…those same disgusting microbes are also covering your computer keyboard, cell phone, television remote, home or office desktop, et al…

China has some of the world’s worst air quality…and it’s bad enough to have the potential to kill tens of thousands of people over the next decade.

Check out these amazing images of our home from the ISS. A link to the full collection at Flickr is included.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

The Tulsa World has some excellent investigative journalism pieces on the recent upswing in Oklahoma earthquakes.

An interesting read on another geological connection to climate: Seafloor Volcano Pulses May Alter Climate: Strikingly Regular Pattern, From Weeks To Eons.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The debate regarding whether 2014 was the hottest ever misses the point, but still it goes on.

Looking into the climates of the past can give scientists clues as to what our future holds.

Speaking of the past, recent history has shown concern over carbon pollution goes back the the 1960’s.

An excellent read on why communicating climate change is so difficult. It’s “The Elephant We’re All Inside Of.”

We targets of vengeful vitriol wonder. “Fear, Ridicule, Danger: Is It Safe to Be a Climate Scientist?”

Though it’s unlikely, there’s no reason why this can’t happen. “What If Sandy’s Surge Swamped Washington D.C.?”

A good read that is part pet department, part weather. “How To Keep Your Pets Safe And Warm During Cold Weather.”

Check out this fantastic video “full screen. “How Airplanes Affect The Atmosphere Around Them.”

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE…

I’m a major league classic film fan…with a very strong inclination toward silent films. If you’ve not seen the restored version of “Nosferatu” (1922), you’re in for a treat.

That’s a wrap for this post!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Science Links And Much More For Nov. 2 – Nov. 9, 2014

This past week has seen a rather tranquil period of weather across most of North America. Alas, it won’t last. The coldest air of the season is scheduled to make its way across the eastern half of the US and will give many a good taste of winter. Grab those sweaters and put an extra log on the fire. We will need it.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Normally, I’m a very apolitical person. Taking into consideration recent political events, this is a very apt essay.

SOCIAL MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY

It’s about time a tool like this showed up on the internet. Meet WAM. While it is specifically geared towards women being harassed online, it can apply to anyone…male or female, young or old. Individuals engaging in harassment and or trolls had best mind their behavior…online and off.

Scientists are rapidly discovering the benefits of using social media for networking and sharing information.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’ve not checked out the Citizen Science Center’s website, I highly recommend you do. “You Can Do Science Too.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

LED bulb efficiency is pulling ahead of compact fluorescent bulbs…and they’re becoming more price friendly too.

A very interesting and encouraging look at America’s solar boom.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A connection between fracking and earthquakes? Surely you jest.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

I’ve had several inquiries via social media and email from folks wanting to know what the coming winter holds. Hopefully this information from NOAA will clear things up. Keep in mind, this is an outlook and NOT a forecast. There is a difference.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has written a very interesting, but rather technical, nine page PDF document on ENSO and the El Nino outlook for this year.

An interesting read on the connection between climate change and emerging diseases.

“In light of the recent IPCC report, we want to dismiss these fallacies and reiterate the truth.” Very well put.

Waters off the west coast of North America are running quite warm. What could this mean for the coming winter?

This is an amazing and rare “must-see” video of glaciers in action. Taking climate change into consideration, this is likely to become more commonplace.

And that’s a wrap for this post! See you folks again soon!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest Gee-O-Science Links April 15 – 22, 2014

Spring is well underway across the Great Plains of the USA. So far, the severe weather activity has been rather quiet, but many active seasons have started out on a somewhat sedate note. As for the next few days, there’s disagreement amongst many computer models but it does appear that the latter part of this week could be active. The best way to deal with nature’s tantrums, of course, it to have an emergency preparedness plan in place. This would be a great time to also get yourself a NOAA weather radio.

Here are this week’s links for your consideration…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Happy Earth Day! (April 22, 2014) Check out these amazing images of our amazing planet.

Philosophy has always been one of my favorite subjects, the philosophy of science in particular. But is it becoming obsolete?

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Here’s a great piece by Chris Mooney that confirms what we, the targets, already know. Internet trolls really are horrible people.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/SUSTAINABILITY

File this under “Are you kidding?” Oklahoma To Charge Homeowners Who Install Solar Panels.

If you suffer from seasonal allergies and this year seems particularly bad, here’s a possible explanation why your sinuses are going crazy.

The US Coast Guard is calling BP’s bluff on the “recovery” of the Gulf coast in the aftermath of the disastrous Deepwater Horizon debacle.

A challenging challenge. Going one week without producing any non-recyclable trash. Think you’re up to it?

Wildfires in the western USA are bigger and more frequent. Considering the ongoing drought, no relief’s in sight.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

The Storm Prediction Center’s Local Storm Reports page has a new look with a host of new features.

The 2014 severe weather season’s been very quiet, especially when it comes to tornadoes. But don’t let that induce any degree of complacency.

March, 2014 was a chilly month across much of the contiguous USA. But from a global perspective, it was an outlier.

The latest USA Drought Monitor is out. Extreme and exceptional conditions persist across parts of CA. CO, KS, NM, NV, OK, & TX.

An El Nino may be on the way for 2014, but it’s not a 100% certainty.

Here’s an interesting read (with references) on climate change and it’s economic ramifications. Complacency amongst current generations will leave future ones with a very high cost.

Last, but certainly not least, the SPC is quite confident about the severe weather potential across the southern plains this weekend (April 26-27). While forecast details are bound to change, they’ve given us a “heads up” on what to expect. Considering the latest model data I’ve seen, this could be the first significant severe weather event of 2014. Having said that, you’ve been advised. Stay safe!

And that’s a wrap for this week!

Cheers!

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