Tag Archives: weather safety

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For June 18 – 25, 2018

Greetings all! It’s been a busy period for severe weather across the Great Plains of the USA with several powerful clusters of thunderstorms traveling hundreds of miles across several states. In stark contrast, the tropical Atlantic is very quiet, but that will change in the months to come. Heat will also be settling in across many areas in North American and the European continent. Again this week I’ve included several links for summer heat and hurricane preparedness that I hope you’ll find useful. Plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

TECHNOLOGY

Since 2005, Firefox has been my browser of choice. Today, it’s leaner and faster than ever…and I couldn’t be happier. Like most folks, I use more than one browser, but Firefox has always been at the top of my favorites list.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Here’s a very cool citizen science project where you can help NOAA research with a free app that helps document the Earth’s constantly changing magnetic field.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLE ENERGY

It’s challenging to cut single use plastics, but it can be done. Here’s a good read on the problem and some tips on how to reduce your use of plastics in the long term.

Wind energy in the USA’s Great Plains is very cheap…and getting more affordable by the day. Fortunately, this part of the country is perfect for this kind of renewable energy.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s a very thorough read from the Union Of Concerned Scientists. “The Science Connecting Extreme Weather To Climate Change. (2018)

The latest US Drought Monitor shows some improvement in scattered locations, but extreme and exceptional conditions persist from UT & AZ into OK & TX.

The Earth’s oceans are becoming more acidic due to carbon emissions which shows the irrevocable climate/ocean link.

WEATHER SAFETY: SUMMER HEAT

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

WEATHER SAFETY: HURRICANES/TROPICAL CYCLONES

The Atlantic ocean is quiet for now and there’s no hint of tropical cyclone development in the near future. Nevertheless, this is the perfect time to prepare for tropical cyclones. Waiting until everyone is in panic mode is the worst way possible to handle a potentially life threatening situation. It’s also important to keep in mind that most deaths from tropical cyclones comes from flooding…not wind. Remember…it only takes one storm to make for a major disaster.

 

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

THE QUIXOTIC

If this doesn’t beat all, I don’t know what does. “The EPA Thinks Its Hurricane Response Was So Great It Ordered Special Coins For Everyone.”

That’s a wrap for this post! I hope all of you are having a great start to summer…or winter…depending on which hemisphere you live in. A big “Thank You” to all my followers in all my social media outlets. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun. There’s plenty more to come!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

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Tornado Quest Science Links In Review For June 11 – 18, 2018

Greetings everyone! El Nino and other climate topics have been given a good deal of discussion lately and we’ve got some links covering those topics. The latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA is out…and I’ll let the data speak for itself. With the ongoing heat wave across much of North America, I’ve included some summer heat safety info along with hurricane preparedness links. Let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE EDUCATION

Few things would benefit our students more than a familiarity with the scientific method and critical thinking…regardless of what field they’re studying. “We Should Teach All Students, In Every Discipline, To Think Like Scientists.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This will have an effect on our weather and climate patterns for some time to come. “The June ENSO forecast estimates a 50% chance of El Niño developing during the late summer or early autumn, and an approximately 65% chance of El Niño conditions in the winter, so forecasters have instituted an El Niño Watch.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

The latest NOAA State Of The Climate report is out and includes a look at significant global climate events for May 2018.

This is unprecedented warmth…and it’s only a small piece of a much larger warming puzzle that’s rapidly falling into place. “The U.S. Just Observed Its Warmest 3-, 4-, And 5-Year Spans On Record.”

Imagery courtesy NOAA

Here’s a good listen about a very unique way of “listening” for tornadoes. If this works out, perhaps this will become part of the warning process of the future.

This is a “spot on” essay on why it’s not productive…or worth your time…to debate science that already has sound evidence to establish its facts.

This week, I’m continuing to pass on weather safety information. With the current heat wave across much of North America, summer heat safety is of utmost importance. It’ll get hotter into July and August…so keep this information handy.

WEATHER SAFETY: SUMMER HEAT

Heat: A Major Killer

Summer Weather Safety & Survival: The Heat Index

Ultra Violet (UV) Radiation Awareness & Safety Info

World Health Organization: UV & Sun Protection

The Atlantic is quiet for now, but this is the perfect time to prepare for tropical cyclones. Waiting until everyone is in panic mode is the worst way possible to handle a potentially life threatening situation. It’s also important to keep in mind that most deaths from tropical cyclones comes from flooding…not wind.

WEATHER SAFETY: HURRICANES/TROPICAL CYCLONES

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post! I hope all of you are having a great summer…or winter…depending on which hemisphere you live in. A big “Thank You” to all my followers in all my social media outlets. I’m glad you’re all along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 30 – May 7, 2018

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active severe weather week across much of the USA. Oddly enough, Oklahoma went the entire month of April without a single tornado. That came to an end in the first week  of May when multiple rounds of severe weather added several tornadoes to the count. We’re also just weeks away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season (June 1st) and May 6 – 12, 2018 is National Hurricane Preparedness week. Even though the peak of hurricane activity isn’t for several months, now it the time to prepare. Check out the link below in Weather Safety for more comprehensive information from the National Weather Service. As usual, there’s plenty to go over, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen scientist is easy (no Ph.D required) and gives you an opportunity to contribute valuable data year round. Check out “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.” If you’re into weather, the CoCoRaHS network and the mPING project are two ways to collect valuable data for climate data banks and severe storm and radar research.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

If you’re not to enthralled about the recent happenings with Facebook, there are plenty of good alternatives.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been very active lately…and that has volcanologists very nervous.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/PUBLIC HEALTH

Ticks are always a hazard to humans with the ability to spread a myriad of life altering diseases. The USA’s Center For Disease Control (CDC) has expressed concern over the matter, but has been cautious in expressing a connection to climate change in this public health hazard.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

A recent dust storm in India killed over 100 people. There were many weather elements involved, including violent thunderstorms with damaging straight line winds.

Part 2 of this essay should be very telling and not a little interesting. “The 1970’s Global Cooling Zombie Myth And The Tricks Some People Used To Keep It Alive: Part 1.”

One of the biggest challenges for our society to comprehend current CO2 levels is because when they were at current levels in the past, humans didn’t exist.

Arctic sea ice is already at record low levels. A recent spike in winter temperatures has happened on consecutive years is making a bad situation even worse.

Climate change means big health issues for those with seasonal allergies. Growing seasons are getting longer and that means a longer pollen season.

Residents of California are getting use to a new weather and climate norm that’s not a little troubling. “Turbulent California faces a future of parched croplands and then flooded townships. Climate scientists call such things whiplash events.”

This past week marked the 19th anniversary of the 3 May 1999 Kansas & Oklahoma tornado outbreak. It was the largest outbreak in the history of Oklahoma, had the 1st billion dollar tornado which was also the 1st time the NWS issued a Tornado Emergency, & had four OK tornadoes in progress simultaneously at the height of the event.

This is the wording used by the Norman, Oklahoma National Weather Service when they issued the first ever Tornado Emergency…the highest level of Tornado Warning that can be issued and is, according to the NWS, “An exceedingly rare tornado warning issued when there is a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage from an imminent or ongoing tornado. This tornado warning is reserved for situations when a reliable source confirms a tornado, or there is clear radar evidence of the existence of a damaging tornado, such as the observation of debris.”

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, has arrived.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Good infographics with severe weather safety information that’s specific to tornadoes.

Once you’re in a structure, there are specific places you need to go for the best protection

Infographics courtesy NOAA & NWS Norman, OK

National Hurricane Preparedness week runs from May 6 – 12, 2018. The National Weather Service has an excellent hurricane preparedness page that covers most everything you need to know. The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) also has a very informative page.

Remember, your mobile device can be your best friend in a weather emergency, whether it’s a tornado or a hurricane.

 

THE QUIXOTIC

This writer visited a Flat Earth Convention (yes, there is such a thing) and learned a great deal about not only the group in question, but insight into certain dimensions of human behavior.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media and a hearty thanks to my long time followers. It’s nice to have all of you along for the fun.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Week In Review For April 9 – 16, 2018

Greetings everyone! I hope that the weather is to your liking regardless of where you’re located. In recent days, the USA has taken quite a beating from blizzards, severe weather outbreaks, and devastating wildfires. Add to that an ongoing drought for the southwestern and southern plains states and it’s not been exactly a quiet spring. For this week’s post, I’ve included severe weather safety information which, to be really honest, is something that we should be aware of year round.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

GENERAL SCIENCE

Searching publications is a routine part of scientific research…but there are barriers that are costly and waste time for many scientists.

Is science hitting a wall in recent years? Personally speaking, I’m quite optimistic about the future of science and feel that there’s no limit to the beneficial discoveries that are in the future of research.

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Becoming a citizen science and contributing data year round in a myriad of ways has never been easier. “Easy Ways To Become A Citizen Scientist.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Spring is arriving earlier and earlier in the USA’s National Parks…and climate change is to blame.

What happens in the Atlantic has a direct effect on the weather in much of North America. “In recent years sensors stationed across the North Atlantic have picked up a potentially concerning signal: The grand northward progression of water along North America that moves heat from the tropics toward the Arctic has been sluggish.”

Like or not, our best intentions to control nature often backfire in our faces. “Taming The Mighty Mississippi May Have Caused Bigger Floods.”

One of the serious downsides to plastics is the fact that it is now making its way back into the food chain. “Hidden Plastics: Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Dunk A Tea Bag.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This excellent infographic explains all the benefits of the National Weather Service’s Doppler radar. When you consider it’s capabilities, it’s no wonder that it has saved so many lives.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

The 10 April marked the 39 anniversary of the Red River Tornado Outbreak…one of the most substantial outbreaks of the 1970’s which included the Wichita Falls F-4 tornado.

The urban heat island effect is something that this urbanite is very familiar with. Summer night-time temperatures can run 10-15F higher than at rural locations 30-40 miles away. Here’s an interesting read on how some overheated cities are taking steps to curb those oppressively hot nights.

Here’s some very important information from the NOAA National Hurricane Center on new products and services for 2018. This is very important for folks living in hurricane prone regions since changes have occurred to information that is meant for the general public.

WEATHER SAFETY

I’ve included once again this week links regarding severe weather safety. This list is just a partial example of the information that is available to keep your loved ones and you safe as we are now well into the North American severe weather season. The peak of severe weather activity, including tornadoes, doesn’t arrive until next month…so now is a good time to get last-minute preparations in place.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

Last but not least, an infographic covering the major severe weather hazards you may encounter. Keep in mind that some hazards, such as heavy rain and lightning, are clear and present dangers even in NON-SEVERE thunderstorms.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. It’s nice to have you along for the fun.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links Review For April 2 – 9, 2018

Greetings to one and all! This week’s post will focus on severe weather safety. Considering the peak of North American severe weather activity is upon us, I wanted to share some links that I hope are helpful in you and your family/friends in establishing a good severe weather safety plan. For example, do you know the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning? You’d be surprised at how many people don’t…and furthermore take the issuance of a Tornado Watch for their location with a potentially dangerous carefree attitude. The infographic below explains the difference and is just the tip of the iceberg on the information in this post. Having said that, let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

CITIZEN SCIENCE

If you’re interested in weather and citizen science, the two links below are the best way to get a good start. Whats more, you can do them year round and from anywhere across the USA and Canada.

CoCoRaHS: Community Collaborative Rainfall, Hail, & Snowfall Network. “Volunteers working together to measure precipitation across the nations.” A FREE app is available for iOS and Android.

mPING: “Weather radars cannot “see” at the ground, so mPING reports are used by the NOAA National Weather Service to fine-tune their forecasts. NSSL uses the data in a variety of ways, including to develop new radar and forecasting technologies and techniques.” The mPING app is FREE and available for both iOS and Android.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

This past week marked the 44th anniversary of the April 3-4, 1974 Superoutbreak of tornadoes. In several parameters, it will hold many records for many, many years in the breadth and scope of one of the USA’s most devastating weather events.

The Xenia, OH F-5 was one of the deadliest and most devastating tornadoes of the April, 1074 Superoutbreak.

This week also marks the 71st anniversary of the Woodward, OK tornado…the deadliest tornado in OK state history.

WEATHER SAFETY

The list below, while not exhaustive, has a good plethora of potentially life saving severe weather safety information.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos: Violent Windstorms Of The Prairie

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

The Weather Channel: Prepare Your Pets For Emergencies

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY INFOGRAPHICS

The following infographics are helpful in that they concisely explain much of the information you hear on your local weather forecasts. Others simply give good ideas on how to get severe weather information and other important safety information.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2018 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Links: Week In Review For July 18 – 25, 2017

Greetings to one and all! I hope the weather is to your liking wherever you are. Here in the southern plains of the USA, the summer heat has gotten a firm grip on us with no let-up in sight. The average high temperature is 95F (35C) which is more than enough to make anyone pine for the cooler breezes of autumn. As of this date (25 July 2017), the eastern Pacific is very busy with three tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously. For now, the Atlantic is very quiet, but that will likely change in the weeks to come. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s post.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

HISTORY OF SCIENCE/EDUCATION

In this day and age, this is a badly needed look at the irrefutable connection with western civilization and the development of the scientific method.

With all the information available on the internet, one would think the hunger for knowledge is satisfied…but it isn’t. Distribution and consumption are mutually exclusive.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A very chilling look at the most ugly elements of online trolling/bullying. “Digital harassment” is now at an all time high. Don’t think for one second that this is limited to Twitter. Facebook, SnapChat, etc. are all riddled with this menace.

Speaking of Twitter, its problems continue in a variety of ways.

PUBLIC HEALTH/WEATHER SAFETY

Since the 1990’s, cases of Lyme disease have skyrocketed across the USA…and climate change has played no small part.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

An excellent read by Dr. Marshall Shepherd. “Four Emerging Misconceptions On Social Media About The Upcoming Great American Eclipse.”

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RECYCLING/RENEWABLES

An eye-opening video that explains the mind-boggling amount of time it takes for some items to “decompose” in a landfill. Many, if not most, are recyclable or have greener alternatives.

The global deforestation continues. “About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in North America and the tropics, putting the year’s global deforestation level at its second-highest point since data gathering began in 2001.”

Some encouraging news regarding our love affair with automobiles. “Electric Cars Will Dominate The Roads By 2040.”

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Based on an extensive amount of NOAA data, the year 2017, only at the halfway point, is already the second warmest year to date.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NCEI & Climate Central

Perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of climate change; how it’s literally killing us.

An interesting satellite SNAFU masked true sea-level rise for decades until it was revised and the data showed an increase as our home warms and ice sheets thaw.

Here’s a look at the recent deadly heat wave that helped fuel wildfires and set many climate records across portions of western Europe.

Infographic courtesy Climate Central

Do you ever wonder how tropical cyclones are named and what criteria is used to remove a name from a list? This excellent read from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has all of your answers. Hopefully this will squelch many of the silly rumors (both old and new) regarding the reasoning behind giving tropical cyclones names.

Here’s a very interesting and interactive look at historical hurricane tracks from the NOAA database.

Finally, a combination of weather history and cultural history. “London’s Hot And Busy Summer Of 1858.”

PUBLIC POLICY

An interesting, but not surprising, development. “Hundreds of climate scientists, including many from the United States, have applied to work in France under a €60-million (US$69-million) scheme set up by the country’s president, Emmanuel Macron, after his US counterpart Donald Trump rejected the Paris accord on global warming.”

That’s a wrap for this post! A big “Welcome” to my new followers in social media. Stick around for lots of fun. We live in very interestingly challenging times.

Cheers!

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Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Science Week In Review For February 25 – March 4, 2017

Greetings everyone and Happy Meteorological Spring to my friends and followers in the Northern Hemisphere. For many, it’s been an exceptionally warm winter and spring is already throttling up. In the USA, Skywarn spotter classes are ongoing as of this post. Check with your local National Weather Service office to see if there’s a class scheduled near you. And, as has been the case for the last few weeks, science and public policy have been front and center…so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Wind and solar power are gaining major ground in countries across the globe. Considering that change is often difficult, how will the status quo adapt?

Cities around the globe smarten up & go green as 2/3 of world population will live in urban areas by 2030.

Air pollution isn’t just a minor irritation, it’s a major health hazard with lethal implications. Here’s an excellent read on how to deal with and/or avoid potentially deadly poor air quality.

Before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was formed in the USA, environmental conditions were in a sorry state. It would behoove us to keep that in mind and fight against the threat of retrograding into a new dark age.

While on the topic of air pollution, other countries besides the USA have their share of air quality issues. The problem for USA citizens is their noxious air travels round the globe and eventually reaches us.

Here’s another sobering look at environmental conditions in the USA in the pre-EPA days.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE

A new earthquake outlook for 2017 highlights Oklahoma and California as the hot-spots for quake activity…so we’ve been warned.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

If it seems like spring has come early this year for much of the Northern Hemisphere, you’re not imagining things.

The new GOES-16 weather satellite is sending back amazing high-resolution images!

For the Northern Hemisphere, the first day of meteorological spring occurred on 1 March 2017. Here’s a look back at an unusually warm winter from Climate Central.

2017winterreview_miami_en_title_lg

Sea surface temperatures and weather/climate are inextricably linked. From the National Weather Service in New Orleans, LA, “The Gulf has remained warm this winter, generally 2-7F above avg now. Pic from the NOAA View Global Data Explorer.”

c53aixlwcaadv9o-jpg-large

For the state of California, it was famine to feast in terms of rainfall. Here’s a look at the “atmospheric rivers” that kept the state dry, then inundated it with dangerous flooding conditions.

Speaking of drought, here’s the Climate Prediction Center’s outlook for March, 2017. In spite of recent rains, drought conditions persist or increase across many areas of the plains and southern states.

month_drought

Though the focus of this article is on the recent heat wave in parts of Australia, it applies to other continents as well. “Climate Scientists Say Likelihood Of Extreme Summers Surging Due To Global Warming.”

What do citizens of the USA think about climate change? This interesting read provides some maps and links to answer that question.

screen-shot-2017-03-01-at-1_22_48-pmPercentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication | George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication

An Argentine research base near the northern tip of the Antarctic peninsula has set a heat record at a balmy 63.5° Fahrenheit (17.5 degrees Celsius) according to the World Meteorological Organization.

Severe Weather Safety Link Of The Week: With the severe weather season well underway across the USA, here’s a very comprehensive yet concise overview of severe weather and it’s hazards from the National Weather Service. “Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, And Lightning. Natures Most Violent Storms.” (20 page PDF file)

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

NOAA is about to take a bit hit from the Trump administration, specifically their satellite division. This is ugly…and it will only get worse. Nefariously draconian comes to mind (considering that much of the life-saving data you benefit from comes from the portion of NOAA that’s under the gun), but that would be to politely generous.

Four Ways NOAA Benefits Your Life Today.” This is a “must-read” by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the irreplaceable benefits that NOAA and the National Weather Service provide to USA citizens.

Do scientists really lose credibility when they become political? Absolutely not. We need all the scientists involved in the current political climate as possible.

Fighting fire with fire is the only way to deal with the building hostilities toward the scientific community.

Things are bad indeed. “Responding to attacks on scientific expertise and threats to public funding, the growing protest of American scientists might also suggest something about the perceived direness of the state of the world under Trump: If the scientists are organizing, then things must be really bad.”

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has stopped collecting important climate and environmental data. No data = no science = no progress.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

A Norwegian news site is on to an excellent way to deal with trolls and/or people who have a “knee-jerk” reaction to a headline and leave hostile and threatening comments. Make them read and article or essay and answer questions about it before they’re allowed to comment. There’s nothing like a little mature, critical thinking to take the place of sophomoric rants.

This disconcerting privacy read will make you think twice about carrying a mobile device in and out of the USA. In case you’re wondering, your Fourth and Fifth Amendment rights don’t apply.

Your privacy in the safety of your own home is also a hazard. Chances are, you are your own worst security risk.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to send out a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. We’re in interesting times…so hang on…lots more fun to come.

Cheers!

————————————————————————————–

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com/

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2017 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest’s Science Week In Review For January 13 – 23, 2017

Greetings everyone! I hope you’re having a good start to the week and the weather is being kind to you no matter where you are. We’ve just had a three day round of severe weather in the southeastern states of the USA including a High Risk on 22 January 2017. A High Risk is very rare, and even more so in January which is a month that’s not known for severe weather or tornadoes. Unfortunately, there’s a considerable amount of damage from Mississippi to Georgia with a number of fatalities. Simultaneously, the northeastern states dealt with a ‘nor’easter’ and California had an unusual amount of rain. It eased the drought conditions that have plagued that state for years, but won’t help much on the long run. This week’s review was delayed several days by the severe weather events and other projects. My next review will be published this Saturday, 28 January 2017. There’s quite a bit to go over this week, so let’s get started.

For your consideration, here are this week’s links…

SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY

Who will lead NOAA and, ultimately the National Weather Service, during the Trump administration? This is something to watch very, very carefully.

Due to the lack of American lawmakers who have a sound scientific literacy, it has become increasingly important that scientists become more involved in the political process.

SCIENCE EDUCATION/CRITICAL THINKING

Pseudoscience is as rampant as ever in our modern day culture and, due to the proliferation of social media, is now more easily distributed to an unwary general public. To put it more succinctly…”This means that just because something catches our attention, or is easy to remember, it does not mean it is useful for understanding a new thing we want to learn.”

CITIZEN SCIENCE

Check out this very cool citizen science project that anyone can take part in. The awesome folks at Science Friday have a nice overview of how folks just like you can help out in year-long bird counts.

TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA

How we process information (and where we get it) has much to do with how we interpret the validity of news…and decide on its validity…even if it’s fake and/or of dubious integrity.

ASTRONOMICAL SCIENCE

A very cool astronomy read on how the universe could contain ten time more galaxies than previously thought.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/RENEWABLES

Is the USA state of Wyoming trying to outlaw clean energy? If so, they’re cutting off their nose to spite their face.

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Here’s an excellent read on severe weather High Risks and associated tornadoes that puts this past week’s severe weather into a historical perspective.

Speaking of tornadoes, is it really that cold inside a tornado? A new study on the tornado vortex says it is cold…very cold.

Since satellite monitoring of sea ice began in the 1970’s, the area of oceans covered by sea ice is at an all time low. Chances are good it’s the lowest it has been for many a millennia.

global-sea-ice-extent-2016The dark burgundy colored line in this NSIDC data graph represents sea ice in 2016. Note how it is far below other lines going back to 1978. Also note that the red line on the far left, representing 2017 to date, is even lower than 2016.

While on the subject of sea ice, take a few minutes and watch this fascinating and well produced video on climate change and its effects on glaciers in Alaska, USA.

Here’s a very good and thought-provoking read from meteorologist Brad Panovich. “It’s Time We Move On From A 0% & 100% Climate Change Debate.”

In case you missed it, “At the exact hour when the presidency transferred hands, the Obama administration’s climate and energy web pages became some of the first casualties of the new Trump administration.”

If the new presidential administration ignores climate change, China is more than willing to step up to the plate and become the world’s leader in climate science.

From a global perspective, some are of the opinion that we’ve almost lost any chance to stave off the effects of climate change. Personally speaking, I’m more optimistic, but we’ve no time to waste on getting the job started…and not letting any one industry or government…get in the way of science.

Fortunately, scientists are reminding citizens of the USA that science has been and always will be a major cornerstone of a civilized, intelligent, educated, and technologically advanced society.

WEATHER SAFETY

Here’s a great read from the American Red Cross on safety travel tips for cold weather conditions.

In light of the recent severe weather events and tornadoes, here’s a quick reminder from the National Weather Service on the difference between a Tornado Watch & a Tornado Warning.

difference-between-tornado-watch-and-warning.

Last but not least, some good news. NOAA’s new GOES-16 satellite is fully functional and is sending back some amazing high-resolution images of the Earth. This is truly a watershed event in the atmospheric sciences!

That’s a wrap for this review! I’d like to welcome my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! Have a great week everybody…see you Saturday!

Cheers!


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